What is Other on Mac Storage and How to Delete it – 7 Steps Guide

Category Archives: MAC Tool

Category Archives: MAC Tool

The Mac has a number of storage tools you can use to help manage your storage space. One of these is the Reduce Clutter tool, which can help you. Other measurements, including measurements in other tools, might calculate storage space differently or show storage categories such as. Storage space on your Mac is precious, especially if you have a 128GB, or even a While most of the main categories for file types is.

Category Archives: MAC Tool - absolutely

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What Is Other in Mac Storage and How Do You Clear It?

Are you facing a “Your startup disk is full” situation? But you have no more movies or photos that you feel you can send to the trash? Don’t despair! You can free up valuable disk space by cleaning the 'Other' storage on your Mac. Read this article to learn how to delete all the useless files occupying your precious storage.

 

Let’s take a look at the Mac 'Other' section and optimize your storage.
 

Tip
 

Managing your Mac’s disk space usage can be really challenging if you decide to keep track of everything manually.
 

An alternative way to look after it is with an automatic tool, dedicated to removing unneeded files quickly. That’s where MacKeeper can come in:    

  1. Download and install MacKeeper
  2. Go to the Safe Cleanup tool
  3. Hit Start Scan
  4. Click Clean Junk Files once the scan is complete

Did you know?

You can enjoy a one-time cleanup for free, so you can take MacKeeper for a test drive without activating the full version.

What is 'Other' on Mac storage?

In a nutshell, the 'Other' storage on a Mac consists of different types of files that don't fall into any particular storage category (like videos, photos, music, apps, or mail). The ‘Other’ category also includes junk files and personal files.

 

To clarify, it might contain the following file types: .pdf, .psd, .doc, browser caches, voice files, message media files stored locally, system caches, archive files like .zip and .dmg disk images, fonts, extensions, app plugins, and other files that don’t belong to the categories above.

 

These 'Other' files can occupy a lot of disk space—by cleaning out the 'Other' section on our Mac we were able to recover a whopping 26GB of storage!

How to check what's taking up 'Other' storage on Mac

To discover what's taking up space on your hard drive (including in the 'Other' category):

  1. Open the Apple menu
  2. Choose About This Mac
  3. Click Storage
storage on mac

Here you'll see an overview of all the available storage on your hard drive, along with the space taken up by various file types. You’ll see a bar divided into several different colored sections, each representing different storage categories. You may need to wait for the system to calculate these sections first.

 

You'll see how much space is being taken up by apps, photos, videos, system files, etc. Usually, a major part of the used space is taken up by the 'Other' section—often between 10 and 40 percent of your used disk space.

 

To get more detailed information on what’s taking up your storage, you can use the advanced macOS tools:

 

1. In the Storage tab click the Manage button

storage window manage button highlighted

2. Use the left-hand panel to access any category. First, you'll see the Recommendations window

recommendations window

Have a click around to see how you can optimize your storage. It’s an excellent idea to manage your Trash preferences from here. Turning on the Empty Bin Automatically option is a great example of how to free up storage regularly.

How to delete 'Other' storage on Mac

Before we take a closer look at the basics of storage management you need to note one crucial thing: starting with macOS Sierra, macOS categorizes files differently to previous versions. So, if you're running the latest macOS Big Sur, it will take a lot less effort from you to clean files in 'Other'.

 

Important: You can’t delete all files from the 'Other' category.

 

To clean the 'Other' category, use this method:

  1. Click anywhere on your Desktop
  2. Press Command + F
  3. Select the This Mac tab
  4. Open the first dropdown menu
  5. Choose Other
  6. Look for and tick File Size and File Extension
  7. Click OK
searching this mac

8. Next, look for PDFs, Pages, DMG, or CSV files by typing their extensions in the search bar

searching this mac

9. Delete anything you don’t need

Clear temporary files located in 'Other' storage

What are temporary files? Well, macOS simply can't work without them. The macOS system creates temporary files at the launch of any app to perform various vital processes. However, after the operating system produces these files, they become outdated really quickly. These files aren't deleted automatically—instead, they are moved to the 'Other' category.

 

We recommend you clean temporary files from the 'Other' section regularly to optimize storage and avoid having to deal with a sluggish Mac. Use the following two methods to do this:

1. How to find and get rid of temporary files in 'Other' on Mac

  1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder from the menu bar
  2. Type in ~/Library
  3. Look for Application Support
application support folder

Application Support is a system folder that contains temporary files. The MobileSync folder, for instance, contains old device backups. Review the details of this folder and delete temporary files that you're sure you don't need anymore.

2. How to find and clear cache in 'Other' on Mac

Different types of cache files can waste disk space. Here's how to delete cache files from the 'Other' category manually:

  1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder from the menu bar
  2. Type ~/Library
  3. Find a Caches folder and copy its contents to the desktop for a backup
library caches folder

4. Move the original Caches folder to Trash

5. Empty your Trash bin

3. How to delete old Time Machine backups

To delete old backups via Time Machine, do the following:

  1. Connect your backup drive to your Mac
  2. Click on the Time Machine icon in the Menu Bar and choose Enter Time Machine
    Note: if you don't have the Time Machine pinned to the menu bar: go to System PreferencesTime Machine — tick the Show Time Machine in the menu bar box
Enter Time Machine

3. Look through your backups and choose the one to delete
4. Click on the Gear icon in the Finder window
5. Choose Delete Backup
6. Confirm the action and enter your admin password

How to delete downloaded files

The Downloads folder can easily get cluttered with large files. In particular, the numerous DMG files that are left after an app is installed can, over time, take up a huge amount of available storage space.

 

Let’s review two methods to remove unneeded downloads:

  1. Open Finder and go to Downloads
  2. Look through the files
  3. Control-click on the documents you don’t need
  4. Choose Move to Bin

 

Or use the macOS storage management tool:

  1. Click the Apple logo and go to About This Mac
  2. Go to Storage then click the Manage button
  3. Navigate to the Documents section and choose Downloads
  4. Mark the files you don’t need and hit the Delete button
manage storage with documents tab highlighted

How to get rid of disk images and archives in 'Other' on Mac

Disk image file types are stored in 'Other' as well. These files don't belong to the system files. They are downloaded exclusively by users. That's why you need to clear 'Othe’ disk images (DMG files) and archives (ZIP files) manually. To locate these ‘Other’ file types:

  1. In the Finder window type .zip or .dmg in the search bar
  2. Choose Search This Mac
  3. You can also sort the documents by size to quickly find and delete the largest ones

Delete files in 'Other' automatically

You can also scan and delete browser extensions by using the Smart Uninstaller tool. You can do it all from one tab, instead of searching through all your web browsers. As an added bonus, you can also review the details of each one of them on the list.

 

To automatically delete browser extensions using Smart Uninstaller:

  1. Navigate to Smart Uninstaller
  2. Hit Start Scan
  3. Wait for the scan results
  4. Go to Browser Extensions
  5. Tick the extensions you want to remove
  6. Click Remove Selected
smart uninstaller in mackeeper

Remove app plugins and app extensions from 'Other' storage on Mac

App plugins and extensions can be categorized as 'Other' as well. To delete unnecessary extensions, you need to delete them from your web browser. It would be best to do this in each browser you use, although that is rather time-consuming.

  1. Open your browser
  2. Find the extension, plugin, or tab panel, or open Tools
  3. Choose the add-ons that you don't use anymore and remove them

Delete iTunes device backups

Device backups are files that also fall under the 'Other' category. If you’ve recently changed to a new iOS device, you might try removing iTunes device backups of your old iPhone or iPad. You’ll be surprised how much storage space can be taken up by such files.

Get rid of everything else from 'Other' on Mac

In addition to all the previous steps, you can also remove screensavers from the 'Other' section. They don’t usually take up that much space, but every bit helps.

To delete screensavers:

  1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder
  2. Type in ~/Library/Screen Savers
  3. Hit Go
  4. Select any screensavers you don’t want and move them to the Trash

 

Hopefully, you’ve now learned a whole lot more about how to get back extra storage on your Mac. Although you can clean all of these files manually, it’s often fiddly and time-consuming. Cleaning software can automate the process, and the best cleaners for Mac can do it in just a few clicks. Getting one can save you a significant amount of time and protect you from removing items that you still need on your hard drive, like system files.

 

Read more guides:

Written By

Ruslana Lishchuk

With over 5 years of supporting Mac users, Ruslana lives and breathes everything Mac. Tech expert, Apple lover, and well, a cutie. Say hi on LinkedIn!

With over 5 years of supporting Mac users, Ruslana lives and breathes everything Mac. Tech expert, Apple lover, and well, a cutie. Say hi on LinkedIn!

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How to add macOS line-of-business (LOB) apps to Microsoft Intune

Use the information in this article to help you add macOS line-of-business apps to Microsoft Intune. You must download an external tool to pre-process your .pkg files before you can upload your line-of-business file to Microsoft Intune. The pre-processing of your .pkg files must take place on a macOS device.

Note

Starting with the release of macOS Catalina 10.15, prior to adding your apps to Intune, check to make sure your macOS LOB apps are notarized. If the developers of your LOB apps did not notarize their apps, the apps will fail to run on your users' macOS devices. For more information about how to check if an app is notarized, visit Notarize your macOS apps to prepare for macOS Catalina.

macOS LOB apps have a maximum size limit of 2 GB per app.

While users of macOS devices can remove some of the built-in macOS apps like Stocks, and Maps, you cannot use Intune to redeploy those apps. If end users delete these apps, they must go to the app store, and manually re install them.

Before your start

You must download an external tool, mark the downloaded tool as an executable, and pre-process your .pkg files with the tool before you can upload your line-of-business file to Microsoft Intune. The pre-processing of your .pkg files must take place on a macOS device. Use the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac to enable Mac apps to be managed by Microsoft Intune.

Important

The .pkg file must be signed using "Developer ID Installer" certificate, obtained from an Apple Developer account. Only .pkg files may be used to upload macOS LOB apps to Microsoft Intune. However, conversion of other formats, such as .dmg to .pkg is supported. For more information about converting non-pkg application types, see How to deploy DMG or APP-format apps to Intune-managed Macs.

  1. Download the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac.

    Note

    The Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac must be run on a macOS machine.

  2. Mark the downloaded tool as an executable:

    • Start the terminal app.
    • Change the directory to the location where is located.
    • Run the following command to make the tool executable:
  3. Use the command within the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac to wrap .pkg LOB app file from a .intunemac file.

    Sample commands to use for the Microsoft Intune App Wrapping Tool for macOS:

    Important

    Ensure that the argument does not contain spaces before running the commands.


    • This command will show usage information for the tool.


    • This command will wrap the .pkg LOB app file provided in to a .intunemac file of the same name and place it in the folder pointed to by .


    • This command will extract the detected parameters and version for the created .intunemac file.

Select the app type

  1. Sign in to the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center.
  2. Select Apps > All apps > Add.
  3. In the Select app type pane, under the Other app types, select Line-of-business app.
  4. Click Select. The Add app steps are displayed.

Step 1 - App information

Select the app package file

  1. In the Add app pane, click Select app package file.
  2. In the App package file pane, select the browse button. Then, select an macOS installation file with the extension .intunemac. The app details will be displayed.
  3. When you're finished, select OK on the App package file pane to add the app.

Set app information

  1. In the App information page, add the details for your app. Depending on the app that you chose, some of the values in this pane might be automatically filled in.
    • Name: Enter the name of the app as it appears in the company portal. Make sure all app names that you use are unique. If the same app name exists twice, only one of the apps appears in the company portal.
    • Description: Enter the description of the app. The description appears in the company portal.
    • Publisher: Enter the name of the publisher of the app.
    • Minimum Operating System: From the list, choose the minimum operating system version on which the app can be installed. If you assign the app to a device with an earlier operating system, it will not be installed.
    • Ignore app version: Select Yes to install the app if the app is not already installed on the device. Select No to only install the app when it is not already installed on the device, or if the deploying app's version number does not match the version that's already installed on the device.
    • Install as managed: Select Yes to install the Mac LOB app as a managed app on supported devices (macOS 11 and higher). A macOS LOB app can only be installed as managed when the app distributable contains a single app without any nested packages and installs to the /Applications directory. Managed line-of-business apps will be able to be removed using the uninstall assignment type on supported devices (macOS 11 and higher). In addition, removing the MDM profile removes all managed apps from the device. The default value is No.
    • Included apps: Review and edit the apps that are contained in the uploaded file. Included app bundle IDs and build numbers are used for detecting and monitoring app installation status of the uploaded file. Included apps list should only contain the application(s) installed by the uploaded file in Applications folder on Macs. Any other type of file that is not an application or an application that is not installed to Applications folder should be removed from the Included apps list. If Included apps list contains files that are not applications or if all the listed apps are not installed, app installation status does not report success.
      Mac Terminal can be used to lookup and confirm the included app details of an installed app.
      For example, to look up the bundle ID and build number of Company Portal, run the following:
      defaults read /Applications/Company\ Portal.app/Contents/Info CFBundleIdentifier
      Then, run the following:
      defaults read /Applications/Company\ Portal.app/Contents/Info CFBundleVersion
    • Category: Select one or more of the built-in app categories, or select a category that you created. Categories make it easier for users to find the app when they browse through the company portal.
    • Show this as a featured app in the Company Portal: Display the app prominently on the main page of the company portal when users browse for apps.
    • Information URL: Optionally, enter the URL of a website that contains information about this app. The URL appears in the company portal.
    • Privacy URL: Optionally, enter the URL of a website that contains privacy information for this app. The URL appears in the company portal.
    • Developer: Optionally, enter the name of the app developer.
    • Owner: Optionally, enter a name for the owner of this app. An example is HR department.
    • Notes: Enter any notes that you want to associate with this app.
    • Logo: Upload an icon that is associated with the app. This icon is displayed with the app when users browse through the company portal.
  2. Click Next to display the Scope tags page.

Step 2 - Select scope tags (optional)

You can use scope tags to determine who can see client app information in Intune. For full details about scope tags, see Use role-based access control and scope tags for distributed IT.

  1. Click Select scope tags to optionally add scope tags for the app.
  2. Click Next to display the Assignments page.

Step 3 - Assignments

  1. Select the Required, Available for enrolled devices, or Uninstall group assignments for the app. For more information, see Add groups to organize users and devices and Assign apps to groups with Microsoft Intune.

Note

Uninstall intend will only be displayed for LOB apps created with Install as managed set to Yes. For more information review App information section earlier on this article.

  1. Click Next to display the Review + create page.

Step 4 - Review + create

  1. Review the values and settings you entered for the app.

  2. When you are done, click Create to add the app to Intune.

    The Overview blade for the line-of-business app is displayed.

The app you have created appears in the apps list where you can assign it to the groups you choose. For help, see How to assign apps to groups.

Note

If the .pkg file contains multiple apps or app installers, then Microsoft Intune will only report that the app is successfully installed when all installed apps are detected on the device.

Update a line-of-business app

  1. Sign in to the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center.
  2. Select Apps > All apps.
  3. Find and select your app from the list of apps.
  4. Select Properties under Manage from the app pane.
  5. Select Edit next to App information.
  6. Click on the listed file next to Select file to update. The App package file pane is displayed.
  7. Select the folder icon and browse to the location of your updated app file. Select Open. The app information is updated with the package information.
  8. Verify that App version reflects the updated app package.

Note

For the Intune service to successfully deploy a new .pkg file to the device you must increment the package and string in the packageinfo file in your .pkg package.

Next steps

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The Files That Make Up the ‘Other’ Storage Category, and How to Remove Them

One of the niceties in the Mac OS is the ability of the system to display how your storage space is being used. Originally introduced in OS X Lion as part of a feature upgrade to the System Information app, the Storage tab displays how much free space is available on each disk attached to your Mac, as well as how a disk’s storage is being used, by category.

If you’re not sure how to find the categories, click the Apple logo in the menu bar in the Finder, select About This Mac from the dropdown menu, and then click the Storage tab. Mouse over a color bar, and a text balloon will pop up, telling you what the category is and how much disk space it’s using.

The categories change as new versions of the OS are released, but the current categories include System files, Documents, Apps, iTunes, Backups, Other, Audio, Music Creation, Photos, Movies, and Purgeable space.

Purgeable space is more or less unique to the Mac; you can find out more about it in the Rocket Yard Guide: What is Purgeable Space in macOS? The next category that seems to get a lot of attention is Other. So, just what is included in Other?

That’s a common question, one you may often ask yourself, especially when you need to free up space when your drive starts to fill up. When that happens, I think most of us tend to look at the Other category and think, there’s a lot of space being used by Other. If I don’t know what it is, and the system doesn’t seem to know either, then why can’t I just delete those files?

What’s in the Other Category
The type of files the operating system assigns to the Other category in the Storage display changes a bit from OS version to OS version, but there was a big shakeup in storage management when Apple introduced macOS Sierra, which caused the Other category to become better defined.

Because of the changes, we’re going to provide two lists for the type of files that are assigned to the Other category: pre macOS (OS X) and post macOS.

Other File Types in OS X
The Other category in OS X was a catchall; it included the following:

  • PDF, doc, and PSD documents and files; essentially most document types that weren’t stored within the Documents folder in a user’s home folder.
  • Disk images, archives, and compressed files, including zip, dmg, pkg, and iso.
  • Files located in the System folder that weren’t installed with the system. This could include most temporary files, swap files, even voice files you added to personalize your Mac’s speaking voice.
  • User installed items, such as screen savers, wallpaper, most iCloud support files, and Application Support files added along with app installations.
  • Both user and system caches, browser caches, and other cache files created by various apps.
  • App plug-ins, app extensions, and app add-ons; this includes all browser add-ons.
  • Any file type not recognized by Spotlight. This includes Boot Camp files, Windows partitions and files, and virtual machine files.

The above list gives you an idea of what may be in the Other category under OS X, and why the Other category tended to be quite large sometimes.

Other File Types in macOS
When macOS was introduced, the Other category, along with the entire Storage system, received a bit of a makeover. Apple went through how files were allocated to categories, and moved many of the former Other files to more appropriate categories. This change was mostly made to accommodate the new Store in iCloud and Optimize Storage features that allowed infrequently used files to be moved to the cloud automatically and free up local space.

The Other category is now used for:

  • Web browser caches and most caches created by apps.
  • Apple Music streams.
  • Photos previews.
  • Most items in the Downloads folder, including installer packages.
  • iOS device backups.

How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other
From the Apple menu, select About This Mac.

OS X Mavericks and earlier: Click the More Info button, and then select the Storage tab.

OS X Yosemite and later: Click the Storage tab.

A stacked bar graph will be displayed for each disk attached to your Mac. It may take a few moments for the bar graph to fill in. When complete, the graph will show how each disk’s storage is being used, broken down by category, including the Other category.

Removing Other Files
Chances are most of the space reported under Other is going to be coming from cache and temporary files, downloaded files, and iOS device backups. We’re going to concentrate on those three types, and show you how to remove their unwanted files.

Cache and Temporary Files: The Rocket Yard has a great guide to finding and removing cache and temp files, so we’re going to direct you to: Tech 101: How to Clear Cache and Temp Files from Mac OS.

Downloaded Files: Some of us tend to download a lot of files. For me, it comes from trying out a lot of different apps. Most of the time, I don’t find the apps that useful and end up deleting them from the /Applications folder. But too many times, the installer package gets left behind in the Downloads folder. To delete the installers, or any other files you’ve downloaded and forgotten about, follow these steps:

Open a Finder window and select Downloads from the sidebar, or select Downloads from the Finder’s Go menu.

Examine the list of files and folders in the Downloads folder. To help you decide which files should be deleted, you can select the Size column to organize the list by the size of the files. This makes it easy to find the largest files that may be impacting your storage space.

When you find a file you wish to remove, right-click (or control-click) on the file and select Move to Trash from the popup menu. You can also drag the file directly to the trash.

Don’t forget to empty the trash to permanently remove the files from your Mac and free up disk space.

The Mac offers another method for removing downloaded files using the Reduce Clutter feature in the Manage Storage tool; we’ll cover that option below.

Device Backups: If you’re using an iOS device, chances are you have multiple backups of the device stored within your iTunes app. Device backups can be a big part of the Other category, depending on how many different devices you have backed up.

Launch iTunes, and select Preferences from the iTunes menu.

Select the Devices button in the Preferences windows toolbar.

Select the device backups you wish to delete from the list. It’s a good idea not to delete the most recent backup, unless the device has also been backed up to your iCloud account.

Make your selection(s), and then click the Delete Backup button.

Reduce Clutter
The Mac has a number of storage tools you can use to help manage your storage space. One of these is the Reduce Clutter tool, which can help you find, view, and delete files. To access the Reduce Clutter tool, perform the following steps:

Open the Storage view as outlined above, under the heading: How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other.

In the System Information window, make sure the Storage tab is selected, and then click the Manage button.

In the window that opens, select Recommendations, which can be found at the top of the sidebar.

Recommendations will reveal a number of options, including Store in iCloud, Optimize Storage, Empty Trash Automatically, and the option we’re interested in, Reduce Clutter.

Click the Review Files button in the Reduce Clutter section.

Select the Documents item in the sidebar.

There are three filters you can apply to help you in finding files to remove: Large Files, Downloads, and File Browser.

Large Files: This filter shows files on your Mac organized with the largest files displayed first, a pretty good way to make big changes to how much space is being taken up on your disk.

Downloads: This will display files in your Downloads folder. The files are organized in the display in groups: Older than 1 year, Older than 6 months, Older than 3 months, and Recent. Within each group, files are presented from largest to smallest.

File Browser: This sets up the display of files similar to how the Finder shows files in Column View mode. Files are organized by size, with the largest appearing on top.

When in the Large Files or Downloads view, you can examine a file or move it to the trash by hovering over the file name. After a moment, two small icons will be displayed: an X, which when clicked will move the selected file to the trash, and a magnifying glass, which when clicked will open a Finder window with the selected file highlighted. When in File Browser mode, right-clicking on a file will produce a popup menu with a single option, to move the file to the trash

Although the Reduce Clutter feature doesn’t offer an automatic method of removing unused or unwanted files, its filtering system lets you quickly discover the files that are taking up the most space; it also provides a convenient way to remove them.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How Do I Password Protect Files and Folders on My Mac?

If you’re serious about safeguarding your sensitive information, password protection on your files and folders is the most sensible way to go.  

 

You shouldn’t consider this to be too cautious. Think of it this way: if you let someone use your Mac, how can you be sure they aren’t looking through your private files? Your device can also get stolen — along with all the files on your hard drive.  

 

So read on to learn about the macOS password protection features you need to use to stay safe.

How to password protect folders on Mac

First, turn your folder into a disk image file (.dmg). You can use this method to create secure archives of files and folders (or even an entire disk, if you’d like).

  1. Find the folder you need to encrypt and add the relevant files to it
  2. Open Finder and go to Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility
  3. From the top menu, select File > New Image > Image from Folder
  4. Once the folder window opens, choose the folder you want to protect with a password Within the pop-up window that appears, you’ll see menus for both Encryption and Image Format  
  5. Select the level of encryption you want to implement (128-bit or 256-bit AES Encryption)
  6. Set a password for the folder
  7. Click the menu next to Image Format and select Read/Write
  8. Click Done and exit the window

 

Not so fast. You’re not done yet!

 

Remember: the original, unencrypted folder is still on your computer. Double-check to confirm you can access the disk image and files inside it. Only now, can you go ahead and delete the original folder.  

How to password protect files on Mac

While Disk Utility remains the most secure way to password protect files and folders on your Mac, there are few alternative methods to avoid unauthorized access.

 

How to password protect Notes

  1. Open the Notes app on your Mac
  2. Create a new note or choose an existing note
  3. Click the lock icon and select Lock Note
  4. You will be prompted to enter a password and select a password hint

You can also follow these steps to protect other iWork files, like Keynote or Numbers.

 

How to password protect PDF files

  1. Open the necessary PDF file in the Preview mode
  2. Go to the menu > File > Export
  3. Select the Encrypt checkbox
  4. Enter your password and click Save

You can easily password protect various files such as images, tables, or text. All you have to do is export them as a PDF, then encrypt that PDF file on your Mac using these steps.  

How to encrypt your Mac hard drive

Consider this the motherlode of password protection for your Mac. Using FileVault, you can encrypt the entire contents of your Mac and password protect access to your hard drive. FileVault even allows you to erase your drive remotely via Find My Mac, preventing unauthorized access to your files in case your computer was stolen.  

 

Here’s how to password protect a hard drive on Mac:

  1. Click the Apple icon to open the main Apple menu. Select System > Preferences > Security & Privacy
  2. Click on the FileVault tab
  3. Click on the lock icon in the bottom left corner of the window
  4. Enter your admin username and password when prompted
  5. Click to enable FileVault
  6. Choose the preferred method of unlocking your disk if you lose your password (iCloud for OS X Yosemite or a recovery key for OS X Mavericks)
  7. Restart your Mac

When choosing an alternative method of unlocking the disk, make sure it’s both secure and easy-to-access. iCloud can be the way to go unless you have trouble accessing your account. By storing the recovery key in a notebook or as a screenshot, you can reach it whenever necessary.  

 

Once your Mac starts encrypting your disk, expect things to run a little slower than usually for the first hour or so. After that, the operating speed will return to normal.

How to encrypt your Mac external drives

If you use removable storage devices for keeping sensitive data, they have to be encrypted as well. Unfortunately, FileVault can’t password protect external drives on your Mac for you. So to secure this drive, you’ll need to take the manual route using Finder or Disc Utility.  

 

How to encrypt external drives using Finder

  1. Connect the drive you want to encrypt to your Mac
  2. Open Finder and right-click the drive from the Finder sidebar
  3. Select Encrypt
  4. Enter a strong password of your choice, plus a password hint
  5. Click Encrypt Disk

 

How to encrypt external drives using Disk Utility

NB! Since this method requires erasing your external drive, you should only use it for new or empty drives. And if you want to partition other drives, make sure you copy all the data before starting the encryption process.

  1. Connect the drive you want to encrypt to your Mac
  2. Open Finder and go to Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility
  3. Select the drive you want to encrypt and click Erase
  4. In the pop-up window, provide a name and select Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted) from the Format drop-down list
  5. Click Erase
  6. Enter a strong password and a hint if you need one
  7. Click Choose

From now on, you’ll need to enter the password every time you restart your Mac or connect the drive.

 

How to encrypt disk images using Disk Utility

  1. Open Finder and go to Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility
  2. Go to the menu > File > New Image > Blank Image
  3. In the pop-up window, you can set up disc image configurations in a specific order:
    • In the Save As field, write the name of the disc image file
    • In the Where drop-down list, select the necessary location
    • In the Name field, write the name to be shown when you open the disc image
    • In the Image Format drop-down list, select sparse disc image
    • In the Size field, set the maximum size you want the disk image to hold in the future
    • In the Image Format drop-down list, select “read/write”
    • In the Encryption drop-down list, select the encryption level (128-bit encryption for large files or 256-bit encryption for super-secret files). Provide a strong password
  4. Once you’re done with the password, click Save and then click Done once the operation is successfully finished

This option allows you to protect disks in use as their size grows along with the content you add.

How to encrypt your Time Machine backups

Securing your backup system on Mac is also an excellent idea.

  1. Go to the Menu bar and click on the Apple icon > System Preferences > Time Machine (near the bottom of the drop-down menu)
  2. Click on Select Backup Disk
  3. Choose the disk you plan on using for your backup, then select the Backup Automatically option
  4. Check the Encrypt Backups option in the bottom left corner of your screen
  5. Enter a secure password, and you’re done!

How to back up to a server or Airport Time Capsule

  1. Go to the Menu bar and click on the Apple icon > System Preferences > Time Machine
  2. Click on Select Backup Disk and select your server or Airport Time Capsule backup destination
  3. Click Use Disk and log in to your server or Airport Time Capsule
  4. Once you’re logged in, enter a password to encrypt your backup disk.
  5. Select Encrypt Disk

 

Your Mac will instantly start the backup process and store it as an encrypted Sparse Bundle Image (a disk image on your Mac containing backed up data).  

 

* * *

 

That’s it, your Mac folders and files are now strictly for your eyes only! But don't forget that password protecting your Mac files is just one piece of the security puzzle. To be truly safe online, you’ll also want to use a Virtual Private Network (or VPN) and other cybersecurity products to protect your identity and keep cybercriminals at bay.  

 

And if you’re looking for a simple app that provides far-ranging protection, try Clario out. It ensures your identity, network, and file protection across devices.

 

Read more:

By Mary Atamaniuk

Updated: Mar 31, 2021

10 min read

Updated: Mar 31, 2021

10 min read

A digital content writer passionate about tech, marketing, and cybersecurity.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

List of macOS components

Wikipedia list article

This is a list of macOS components—features that are included in the current Mac operating system.

/Applications[edit]

GarageBand[edit]

Main article: GarageBand

GarageBand is a line of digital audio workstations for macOS, iPadOS, and iOS devices that allows users to create music or podcasts.

iMovie[edit]

Main article: iMovie

iMovie is a video editing software application developed by Apple Inc. for macOS and iOS devices. iMovie was released in 1999.

Safari[edit]

Main article: Safari (web browser)

Safari is the default web browser included with macOS since version 10.3 "Panther". It uses the WebKit browser engine.[1]

/System/Applications[edit]

App Store[edit]

Main article: App Store (macOS)

The App Store is macOS's digital distribution platform for macOS apps, created and maintained by Apple Inc. The platform was announced on October 20, 2010, at Apple's "Back to the Mac" event.[2][3] First launched on January 6, 2011, as part of the free Mac OS X 10.6.6 update for all current Snow Leopard users,[2][3] Apple began accepting app submissions from registered developers on November 3, 2010, in preparation for its launch.[5] After 24 hours of release, Apple announced that there were over one million downloads.[6]

Automator[edit]

Automator is an app used to create workflows for automating repetitive tasks into batches for quicker alteration via point-and-click (or drag and drop). This saves time and effort over human intervention to manually change each file separately. Automator enables the repetition of tasks across a wide variety of programs, including Finder, Safari, Calendar, Contacts and others. It can also work with third-party applications such as Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop or Pixelmator. The icon features a robot holding a pipe, a reference to pipelines, a computer science term for connected data workflows. Automator was first released with Mac OS X Tiger (10.4).[7]

Automator provides a graphical user interface for automating tasks without knowledge of programming or scripting languages. Tasks can be recorded as they are performed by the user or can be selected from a list. The output of the previous action can become the input to the next action.

Automator comes with a library of Actions (file renaming, finding linked images, creating a new mail message, etc.) that act as individual steps in a Workflow document. A Workflow document is used to carry out repetitive tasks. Workflows can be saved and reused. Unix command line scripts and AppleScripts can also be invoked as Actions. The actions are linked together in a Workflow. The Workflow can be saved as an application, Workflow file or a contextual menu item. Options can be set when the Workflow is created or when the Workflow is run. A workflow file created in Automator is saved in /Users/{User Name}/Library/Services.

Starting in macOS Monterey, Automator is being replaced by Shortcuts.

The icon for Automator features a robot, known as Otto the Automator.[citation needed]

Books[edit]

Main article: Apple Books

Calculator[edit]

Main article: Calculator (macOS)

Calculator is a basic calculatorapplication made by Apple Inc. and bundled with macOS. It has three modes: basic, scientific, and programmer. Basic includes a number pad, buttons for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing, as well as memory keys. Scientific mode supports exponents and trigonometric functions, and programmer mode gives the user access to more options related to computer programming.

The Calculator program has a long history going back to the very beginning of the Macintosh platform, where a simple four-function calculator program was a standard desk accessory from the earliest system versions. Though no higher math capability was included, third-party developers provided upgrades, and Apple released the Graphing Calculator application with the first PowerPC release (7.1.2) of the Mac OS, and it was a standard component through Mac OS 9. Apple currently ships a different application called Grapher.

Calculator has Reverse Polish notation support, and can also speak the buttons pressed and result returned.

The Calculator appeared first as a desk accessory in first version of Macintosh System for the 1984 Macintosh 128k. Its original incarnation was developed by Chris Espinosa and its appearance was designed, in part, by Steve Jobs when Espinosa, flustered by Jobs's dissatisfaction with all of his prototype designs, conceived an application called The Steve Jobs Roll Your Own Calculator Construction Set that allowed Jobs to tailor the look of the calculator to his liking. Its design was maintained with the same basic math operations until the final release of classic Mac OS in 2002.[8]

A Dashboard Calculator widget is included in all versions of macOS from Mac OS X Tiger onwards. It only has the basic mode of its desktop counterpart. Since the release of OS X Yosemite, there is also a simple calculator widget available in the notifications area.[9]

Since the release of Mac OS X Leopard, simple arithmetic functions can be calculated from Spotlight feature.[10] They include the standard addition, subtraction, division, multiplication, exponentiation and the use of the percent sign to denote percentage.

Calendar[edit]

Main article: Calendar (Apple)

Calendar is a personal calendar app made by Apple Inc. that runs on both the macOSdesktopoperating system and the iOSmobile operating system. It offers online cloud backup of calendars using Apple's iCloud service, or can synchronize with other calendar services, including Google Calendar and Microsoft Exchange Server.

Chess[edit]

Screenshot of Apple Chess

Apple Chess is a 3Dchess game for macOS, developed by Apple Inc. as a fork of GNOME Chess (formerly "glChess").[11] Its history dates back to OpenStep and Mac OS X 10.2. It supports chess variants such as crazyhouse and suicide chess. Apple redistributes the source code under its own Apple Sample Code License, after a special permission has been granted from the original authors of GNOME Chess (which is licensed under GPL3).[12][11] Apple ships with the game also the Sjeng chess engine (GPL).

Contacts[edit]

Main article: Contacts (Apple)

Contacts, called Address Book before OS X Mountain Lion, is a computerized address book included with Apple Inc.'s macOS. It includes various synchronizing capabilities and integrates with other macOS applications and features.

Dictionary[edit]

Main article: Dictionary (software)

Dictionary is an application that includes an in-built dictionary and thesaurus.[13]

FaceTime[edit]

Main article: FaceTime

Find My[edit]

Main article: Find My

First added to macOS 10.15, it tracks location of compatible devices connected via iCloud.[14]

Font Book[edit]

Main article: Font Book

Home[edit]

Main article: HomeKit

Home is the front-end for Apple's HomeKit software framework.

Image Capture[edit]

Main article: Image Capture

Launchpad[edit]

Main article: Launchpad (macOS)

Launchpad is an application launcher for macOS that was first introduced in Mac OS X Lion. Launchpad provides an alternative way to start applications in macOS, in addition to other options such as the Dock (toolbar launcher), Finder (file manager), Spotlight (desktop search) or Terminal (command-line interface).[15]

Mail[edit]

Main article: Mail (Apple)

Maps[edit]

Main article: Apple Maps

Messages[edit]

Main article: Messages (Apple)

Mission Control[edit]

Main article: Mission Control (macOS)

Music[edit]

Main article: Music (software)

News[edit]

Main article: Apple News

Notes[edit]

Main article: Notes (Apple)

Notes is macOS's notetaking app. It had first been developed for iOS, but had first been introduced to macOS starting with OS X Mountain Lion. Its main function is provide a service for creating short text notes in the computer, as well as being able to be shared to other macOS or iOS devices via Apple's iCloud service.

Photo Booth[edit]

Main article: Photo Booth

Photo Booth is a camera application for macOS. It utilizes the front iSight camera to take pictures and videos.[16][17]

Photos[edit]

Main article: Apple Photos

Photos is a photo management and editing application that was designed based on the in-built app released for iOS 8. On macOS, Photos was first introduced to OS X Yosemite users in the 10.10.3 update on April 8, 2015,[18][19][20] replacing iPhoto.[21][22]

Podcasts[edit]

Main article: Podcasts (software)

Preview[edit]

Main article: Preview (macOS)

QuickTime Player[edit]

Main article: QuickTime

The QuickTime player is an application that can play video and sound files.[23]

Reminders[edit]

Main article: Reminders (Apple)

Task-managing app introduced to OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion and iOS 5.

Siri[edit]

Main article: Siri

Introduced in macOS 10.12, Siri is a digital assistant that allows the user to interact with it to ask questions, make recommendations, and perform actions on the device. It had been previously included in iOS.

Stickies[edit]

Main article: Stickies (Apple)

Stocks[edit]

Stocks is an application that provides information regarding stocks of various companies around the world.

System Preferences[edit]

Main article: System Preferences

TV[edit]

Main article: Apple TV (software)

TextEdit[edit]

Main article: TextEdit

Time Machine[edit]

Main article: Time Machine (macOS)

Time Machine is an application where the user can back up their files.[24][25]

Voice Memos[edit]

Voice Memos, introduced in macOS Mojave,[26] is a basic application with the capability of recording audio. In addition to this, it allows several editing functions, such as trimming and overwriting.[27]

/System/Applications/Utilities[edit]

Activity Monitor[edit]

"Activity monitor" redirects here. For the fitness device, see Activity tracker. For the generic system component, see System monitor.

Activity Monitor is a system monitor for the macOSoperating system, which also incorporates task manager functionality.[28][29] Activity Monitor appeared in Mac OS X v10.3, when it subsumed the functionality of the programs Process Viewer (a task manager) and CPU Monitor found in the previous version of OS X.[30][31] In OS X 10.9, Activity Monitor was significantly revamped and gained a 5th tab for "energy" (in addition to CPU, memory, disk, and network).[32]

AirPort Utility[edit]

AirPort Utility is a program that allows users to configure an AirPortwireless network and manage services associated with and devices connected to AirPort Routers. It comes pre-installed on macOS, and is available to download for Microsoft Windows and iOS. AirPort Utility is unique in that it offers network configuration in a native application as opposed to a web application. It provides a graphical overview of AirPort devices attached to a network, and provides tools to manage each one individually. It allows users to configure their network preferences, assign Back to My Mac accounts to the network, and configure USB attached Printers and hard drives.[33] The current versions are 6.3.6 for recent versions of macOS, 5.6.1 for Microsoft Windows and older versions[34] of Mac OS X,[35] and 1.3.4 for iOS.[36]

On January 30, 2013, Apple released AirPort Utility 6.0 for macOS featuring a redesign of the user interface focused on increasing usability for novice users.[37] Reception was mixed with some media outlets reporting IT professionals and network administrators being frustrated over some removed features.[37] It was reported that most end users, however, wouldn't notice the feature omissions.[38] Users requiring the removed features can still access the previous version of AirPort Utility using a workaround.[39]

Audio MIDI Setup[edit]

The Audio MIDI Setup utility is a program that comes with the macOS operating system for adjusting the computer's audio input and output configuration settings and managing MIDI devices.

It was first introduced in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard as a simplified way to configure MIDI Devices. Users need to be aware that prior to this release, MIDI devices did not require this step, and it mention of it might be omitted from MIDI devices from third-party manufactures.

Bluetooth File Exchange[edit]

Bluetooth File Exchange is a utility that comes with the macOSoperating system, used to exchange files to or from a Bluetooth-enabled device. For example, it could be used to send an image to a cellphone, or to receive an image or other documents from a PDA.

Boot Camp Assistant[edit]

Main article: Boot Camp (software)

Assists users with installing Windows on their Mac using Boot Camp.[40] Boot Camp does not support Macs with Apple silicon processors. This is because Windows 10 does not currently have a commercial version of Windows 10 that runs on ARM based processors.

ColorSync Utility[edit]

ColorSync Utility is software that ships with macOS. It is used for management of color profiles and filters used in Apple's PDFworkflow, or applying filters to PDF documents.

The interface is composed of two parts: the document browser and the utility window. The document browser lets the user zoom in and out of an image or apply a Filter to it. The utility window has several options: Profile First Aid, Profiles, Devices, Filters and Calculator.

Profile First Aid allows the user to repair ColorSync color profiles so they conform to the International Color Consortium specification.

Profiles allows the user to browse the profiles installed on the system, grouped by location, class or space, and graphically compare any two profiles.

The profile map is displayed as a rotatable, scalable 3D object and can be plotted in CIELAB, CIELUV, YXY, YUV and CIEXYZ.

The Devices section allows the user to see a list of all registered ColorSync devices such as displays and printers, and see what ColorSync profile is applied to each one. It is also possible to override the default setting.

The Filters section allows the user to build and modify PDF filters that are available to the rest of the operating system. Each filter can be set to appear in one of three domains: Application, PDF Workflows, and Printing.

Filters set to Printing will appear in the drop-down menu under the "Save as PDF..." button in the standard Mac OS X print dialog box. Filters set to PDF Workflow will appear in the Quartz Filters drop-down menu in the ColorSync section of a print dialog box. The default filters that ship with Mac OS X are:

  • Black & White
  • Blue Tone
  • Create Generic PDFX-3 Document
  • Gray Tone
  • Lightness Decrease
  • Lightness Increase
  • Reduce File Size
  • Sepia Tone

User-created filters can have color management, image effects, PDF retouch, domain selection and comments.

The Color Management section allows assigning a profile, choosing a default profile, rendering intent, converting to a profile or intermediate transform.

The Intermediate Transform section allows adjustment of brightness, tint, hue, saturation, bilevel (high pass filter) or profile assignment, to either grayscale, RGB or CMYK, or all data in the file. This can be applied to either text, graphics, images or shading.

Complex filters can be created by stacking multiple effects. Any changes made to the PDF file can then be saved as a new PDF file.

Calculator can convert between RGB, CMYK and other color value schemes, and features an interactive color-picker for identifying a color on the screen, duplicating a feature of another bundled utility, DigitalColor Meter.

ColorSync is Apple Inc.'s color managementAPI for the Classic Mac OS and macOS. Apple developed the original 1.0 version of ColorSync as a Mac-only architecture, which made it into an operating system release in 1993. In the same year, Apple co-founded the International Color Consortium (ICC) to develop a cross-platform profile format which became part of ColorSync 2.0. The system Color Management Module (CMM) was "LinoColorCMM", which was developed by Linotype-Hell AG (now part of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG). The same CMM was used in Microsoft Windows 2000 and XP under the rubric of "Image Color Management" (ICM).[citation needed] Apple, with the help of Adobe had ported ColorSync 2.0 and its SDK to Microsoft Windows. With ColorSync 3.0, the Windows version which was initially planned was discontinued. ColorSync 4.0 is the latest version, introduced in Mac OS X 10.1.

Human color perception is a very complex and subtle process, and different devices have widely different color gamuts or ranges of color they can display. To deal with these issues, ColorSync provides several different methods of doing color matching. For instance, perceptual matching tries to preserve as closely as possible the relative relationships between colors, even if all the colors must be systematically distorted in order to get them to fit within the gamut of the destination device. Because the human eye is more sensitive to color differences rather than absolute colors, this method tends to produce the best-looking results, subjectively speaking, for many common uses, but there are other methods that work better in some cases. (This set of rendering intents is part of the ICC system, and is available on all systems with ICC.)

As dictated by the ICC system, the profile connection space in ColorSync is the CIE XYZ color space. All image input and output devices (scanners, printers, displays) have to be characterized by providing an ICC profile that defines how their color information is to be interpreted relative to this reference color space. This profile might be provided by the device manufacturer, but for better quality results, it might be generated by performing actual measurements on the device with a colorimeter. Thus, when an image is scanned on a scanner, the image file will include a copy of the scanner's profile to characterize the meaning of its color information. Then, before the image is sent to an output device, a matching process converts the color information at the time of rendering from the source profile (that attached to the image) to the destination profile (that attached to the output device) so that the resulting colors print or display as closely as possible to the original image.

Console[edit]

Console is a log viewer developed by Apple Inc. and included with macOS. It allows users to search through all of the system's logged messages, and can alert the user when certain types of messages are logged.[41] The Console is generally used for troubleshooting when there is a problem with the computer.[42] macOS itself, as well as any applications that are used, send a constant stream of messages to the system in the form of log files. The console allows you to read the system logs, help find certain ones, monitor them, and filter their contents.[43]

Clicking on "Show Log List" in the toolbar will bring up the Log List. The Log List opens a sidebar which shows all of the different logs that the system maintains. This list helps in viewing the many different logs maintained in various parts of the system by bringing them all together to one place. By clicking on a particular log category, all of the logs will be shown.[44]

The System Log Queries contains all of the logs that have to do with the entire system. This includes system logs as well as individual application logs.[44]

Selecting All Messages gives a live look at your computer's activities, updated live. This includes all activities from both the system as well as any applications running. Logs in this section of the Console are all formatted uniformly. They all include a timestamp, the name of the process or application, and the actual message of the log. When the message displayed includes a paperclip icon next to it, it means that it is a shortened version of a longer report, and clicking the icon will show the complete report.[45]

In addition to viewing all messages, users can also create custom queries with any criteria that they like. These custom queries will filter the messages and will also be shown in the All Messages section. In order to make a new query, choose "New System Log Query" from the File menu.[46]

Digital Color Meter[edit]

Main article: Digital Color Meter

Disk Utility[edit]

Main article: Disk Utility

Grapher[edit]

Main article: Grapher

Keychain Access[edit]

Main article: Keychain (software)

Migration Assistant[edit]

Main article: Migration Assistant (Apple)

Migration Assistant is an application for migrating information from another computer to the computer in use. It may be from a Windows computer or a Mac.

Screenshot[edit]

Available in macOS Mojave (10.14) and above,[47] the Screenshot app bundles features such as screen recording and taking screenshots. Screenshot is initialized whenever the user presses the keyboard shortcuts ++, ++, ++, or ++.[48]

Script Editor[edit]

Main article: AppleScript Editor

System Information[edit]

Main article: System Information (Mac)

System Information is an application that shows the system information about a Macintosh product.

Terminal[edit]

Main article: Terminal (macOS)

VoiceOver Utility[edit]

Main article: VoiceOver

VoiceOver is an application where the user can listen to spoken descriptions on the computer.[49][50]

/System/Library/CoreServices[edit]

AddPrinter[edit]

AddressBookUrlForwarder[edit]

AirPlayUIAgent[edit]

AirPort Base Station Agent[edit]

AppleScript Utility[edit]

Automator Application Stub[edit]

Automator Installer[edit]

AVB Audio Configuration[edit]

Bluetooth Setup Assistant[edit]

BluetoothUIServer[edit]

CalendarFileHandler[edit]

Captive Network Assistant[edit]

Certificate Assistant[edit]

The Certificate Assistant is a utility for creating and verifying digital certificates.

ClimateProxy[edit]

Clock[edit]

ControlCenter[edit]

Control Center provides access to system controls, such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Sound, in a unified interface accessible from the menu bar. Some of these controls can be added to the menu bar by dragging them from Control Center. Additional components can be added in System Preferences.[51] Available controls include:

  • Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth
  • AirDrop
  • Do Not Disturb
  • Keyboard Brightness (available on Mac notebooks)
  • Screen Mirroring
  • Display
  • Sound
  • Now Playing
  • Accessibility Shortcuts
  • Battery (available on Mac notebooks)
  • Fast User Switching

ControlStrip[edit]

Control Strip provides controls in the Touch Bar for common settings like brightness and volume.[52]

CoreLocationAgent[edit]

CoreLocationAgent is responsible for displaying authorization prompts to allow apps and widgets to access location services.[53]

CoreServicesUIAgent[edit]

Database Events[edit]

DiscHelper[edit]

DiskImageMounter[edit]

Main article: DiskImageMounter

DiskImageMounter is a CoreServices application used to mount disk images.

Dock[edit]

Main article: Dock (macOS)

The Dock is the main method of launching applications on macOS.

Dwell Control[edit]

Dwell allows the pointer to be controlled using head or eye tracking technologies. A user can also trigger actions by dwelling or holding the pointer still for a specified amount of time which will trigger the programmed dwell actions.

EscrowSecurityAlert[edit]

Family (OSX)[edit]

Finder[edit]

Main article: Finder (software)

Finder is the default file manager and graphical interfaceshell of macOS.

FolderActionsDispatcher[edit]

FolderActionsDispatcher is responsible for monitoring changes to the filesystem to run Folder Action scripts.

Games[edit]

HelpViewer[edit]

Main article: Apple Help Viewer

iCloud[edit]

Image Events[edit]

Install Command Line Developer Tools[edit]

This utility allows developers to easily install command line tools for building, creating, and editing Xcode projects through the terminal, but does not require Xcode to be installed. It is possible to execute this program by running in the terminal.[54]

Install in Progress[edit]

Install in Progress is another application included in macOS (and in its progenitors OPENSTEP and NeXTSTEP) that extracts and installs files out of .pkg packages. It was created by NeXT, and is now maintained by Apple Inc.[citation needed]

Installer Progress[edit]

Installer[edit]

Main article: Installer (macOS)

JavaLauncher[edit]

KeyboardAccessAgent[edit]

KeyboardSetupAssistant[edit]

Keychain Circle Notification[edit]

Keychain Circle Notification is involved in iCloud Keychain syncing.

Language Chooser[edit]

[edit]

loginwindow[edit]

The loginwindow process displays the macOS login window at system startup if auto-login is not set, verifies login attempts, and launches login applications. It also implements the Force Quit window, restarts macOS user interface components (the Dock and Finder) if they crash, and handles the logout, restart, and shutdown routines. [55][56]

Users are assigned their own loginwindow when they log in; if a loginwindow process belonging to a specific user is force quit, they will be logged out.[57]

ManagedClient[edit]

macOS Setup Assistant[edit]

Setup Assistant is the app that allows users that have installed a fresh copy of macOS or have just bought a new Mac to set it up and configure important settings like Computer Accounts, Apple ID, iCloud, and Accessibility settings. It is also run after major macOS system upgrades.

Memory Slot Utility[edit]

NetAuthAgent[edit]

NetAuthAgent is an interface for authenticating with network file servers and selecting shares.

NotificationCenter[edit]

NotificationCenter is an application that displays notifications from apps and websites. Users access Notification Center by clicking the clock in the menu bar on macOS Big Sur or the Notification Center icon in earlier versions of macOS. Notification Center can be customized in System Preferences.

NowPlayingTouchUI[edit]

NowPlayingWidgetContainer[edit]

OBEXAgent[edit]

OBEXAgent is a server that handles Bluetooth access.

ODSAgent[edit]

ODSAgent is a server that handles remote disk access.[58]

OSDUIHelper[edit]

OSDUIHelper displays on-screen graphics when certain settings, such as volume or display brightness, or adjusted.

PIPAgent[edit]

PIPAgent manages the picture-in-picture feature available in macOS Sierra and later.

Paired Devices[edit]

Pass Viewer[edit]

Photo Library Migration Utility[edit]

Photo Library Migration Utility migrates iPhoto and Aperture libraries to Photos.

PodcastsAuthAgent[edit]

PowerChime[edit]

PowerChime, present on some MacBook models, is a macOS service that plays a chime when plugged in to power.[59]

Problem Reporter[edit]

ProfileHelper[edit]

RapportUIAgent[edit]

rcd[edit]

RegisterPluginIMApp[edit]

ReportPanic[edit]

ReportPanic is an app that displays a window when the system reboots from a kernel panic; it allows the user to send a report to Apple.[60]

Rosetta 2 Updater[edit]

Screen Time[edit]

screencaptureui[edit]

screencaptureui draws the user interface shown when taking a screenshot.

ScreenSaverEngine[edit]

ScreenSaverEngine is an application that handles screen saver access

[edit]

ScriptMonitor[edit]

Siri[edit]

Main article: Siri

Siri is the virtual assistant that is part of Apple's iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, macOS, and tvOS operating systems. Siri uses voice queries and a natural-language user interface to answer questions, make recommendations, and perform actions by delegating requests to a set of Internet services.

Siri was launched to macOS in 2016 with the release of macOS Sierra (10.12).

Software Update[edit]

Software Update is a section in System Preferences for Mac Software Updates, as well as updates to core Mac apps, starting in macOS Mojave (10.14); it also has an item in the Apple menu. From OS X Mountain Lion (10.8)[61] to macOS High Sierra (10.13), the Mac App Store was used for Software Updates; prior to that, Software Update was a separate utility, which could be launched from the Apple menu or from the Software Update pane in System Preferences.

SpacesTouchBarAgent[edit]

Spotlight[edit]

Main article: Spotlight (software)

Spotlight in OS X Yosemite

Spotlight is macOS's selection-based search system, used for indexing documents, pictures, music, applications, and System Preferences within the computer.

System Events[edit]

SystemUIServer[edit]

SystemUIServer manages status items in the menu bar.

[edit]

TextInputSwitcher[edit]

ThermalTrap[edit]

ThermalTrap notifies users when the system temperature exceeds a usable limit.

UIKitSystem[edit]

UniversalAccessControl[edit]

UnmountAssistantAgent[edit]

UnmountAssistantAgent displays a dialog if there is a process preventing ejection of a disk and offers to forcibly eject the disk if the process cannot be quit.

UserNotificationCenter[edit]

VoiceOver[edit]

WatchFaceAlert[edit]

WidgetKit Simulator[edit]

/System/Library/CoreServices/Applications[edit]

About This Mac[edit]

About This Mac shows information about the Mac it is running on, such as the hardware, serial number, and macOS version.[62]

Archive Utility[edit]

Archive Utility (BOMArchiveHelper until Mac OS X 10.5) is the default archive file handler in macOS. It is usually invoked automatically when opening a file in one of its supported formats.[63] It can be used to create compressed ZIP archives by choosing "Create archive of 'file'" (Leopard: "Compress") in the Finder's File or contextual menu. It is located at in Mac OS X 10.10, in 10.5 and later, and in 10.4[64] Prior to Archive Utility's inclusion in Mac OS X v10.3, beginning with Mac OS 7.6, Apple bundled the freeware StuffIt Expander with the operating system.

Invoking Archive Utility manually shows a minimal GUI letting the user change Archive Utility preferences or choose files to compress or uncompress.

BOM is an abbreviation of Bill of Materials. Bill of Materials files or .bom files are used by the macOS Installer program to document where files in an installer bundle are installed, what their file permissions should be, and other file metadata. Thus, a Bill of Materials is read by the Installer, and Archive Utility helps it by extracting the files specified in the BOM.

DVD Player[edit]

Main article: DVD Player (Mac OS)

DVD Player (formerly Apple DVD Player) is the default DVD player in macOS. It supports all the standard DVD features such as multiple audio, video & subtitle tracks as well as Dolby Digital 5.1 passthrough, DVD access URLs and closed captions. In some instances, users can choose which VOB file to open. DVD Player is also fully compatible with DVDs authored by DVD Studio Pro and iDVD, including HD DVDs by DVD Studio Pro.

Directory Utility[edit]

Main article: Directory Utility

Expansion Slot Utility[edit]

Expansion Slot Utility allows manual allocation of PCIe card bandwidth. It is only available on certain Mac Pro models.

Feedback Assistant[edit]

Folder Actions Setup[edit]

iOS App Installer[edit]

iOS App Installer is a app that downloads .ipa files for iPadOS applications so that they can be run on Apple silicon-based Macs.

Network Utility[edit]

Main article: Network Utility

Screen Sharing[edit]

Screen Sharing is a basic Mac utility that may be used to control remote computers and access their files. To connect, one may enter a VNC or Apple ID and authenticate as a local user on the remote computer, or, if the computers are linked via the same Apple ID, automatically initialise the connection. It supports features such as a shared clipboard between the two computers and remotely transferring files. The feature must be enabled in the Sharing preference pane in System Preferences.[65]

Storage Management[edit]

Ticket Viewer[edit]

Ticket Viewer is an app that displays Kerberos tickets.

Wireless Diagnostics[edit]

Other applications and accessories[edit]

Crash Reporter[edit]

Crash Reporter is the standard crash reporter in macOS.[66] Crash Reporter can send the crash logs to Apple Inc. for their engineers to review.

Crash Reporter has three modes of operations:

  • Basic — The default mode. Only application crashes are reported, and the dialog does not contain any debugging information.
  • Developer — In addition to application crashes, crashes are also displayed for background and system processes.
  • Server — The default for macOS Server systems. No crash reports are shown to the user (though they are still logged).
  • None — Disables the dialog prompt. Crash reports are neither displayed nor logged.

The developer tool CrashReporterPrefs can be used to change modes, as can using the terminal command .

In basic mode, if Crash Reporter notices an application has crashed twice in succession, it will offer to rename the application's preference file and try again (corrupted preference files being a common cause of crashes).

When reporting a crash, the top text field of the window has the crash log, while the bottom field is for user comments. Users may also copy and paste the log into their e-mail client to send to a third-party application developer for the developer to use.

Directory Access[edit]

Internet Connect[edit]

Main article: Internet Connect

NetInfo Manager[edit]

ODBC Administrator[edit]

Printer Setup Utility[edit]

Older applications[edit]

Classic[edit]

JPEGViewrunning in the Classic Environment

"MacOS Classic" redirects here. For the pre-Mac OS X operating system for Macs, see Classic Mac OS.

The Classic Environment, usually referred to as Classic, is a hardware and softwareabstraction layer in PowerPC versions of Mac OS X that allows most legacyapplications compatible with Mac OS 9 to run on Mac OS X. The name "Classic" is also sometimes used by software vendors to refer to the application programming interface available to "classic" applications, to differentiate between programming for Mac OS X and the classic version of the Mac OS.

The Classic Environment is supported on PowerPC-based Macintosh computers running versions of Mac OS X up to 10.4 "Tiger", but not with 10.5 "Leopard" or Macintoshes utilizing any other architecture than PowerPC.

The Classic Environment is a descendant of Rhapsody's "Blue Box" virtualization layer, which served as a proof of concept. (Previously, Apple A/UX also offered a virtualized Mac OS environment on top of a UNIX operating system.) It uses a Mac OS 9 System Folder, and a New World ROM file to bridge the differences between the older PowerPC Macintosh platforms and the XNUkernel environment. The Classic Environment was created as a key element of Apple's strategy to replace the classic Mac OS (versions 9 and below) with Mac OS X as the standard operating system (OS) used by Macintosh computers by eliminating the need to use the older OS directly.

The Classic Environment can be loaded at login (for faster activation when needed later), on command, or whenever a Mac OS application that requires it is launched (to reduce the use of system resources when not needed). It requires a full version of Mac OS 9 to be installed on the system, and loads an instance of that OS in a sandbox environment, replacing some low-level system calls with equivalent calls to Mac OS X via updated system files and the Classic Support system enabler. This sandbox is used to launch all "classic" Mac OS applications—there is only one instance of the Classic process running for a given user, and only one user per machine may be running Classic at a time.

If the user chooses to launch the Classic Environment only when needed, launching a "classic" application first launches the Classic Environment, which can be configured to appear in a window resembling the display of a computer booting into Mac OS 9. When the Classic Environment has finished loading, the application launches. When a "classic" application is in the foreground, the menu bar at the top of the screen changes to look like the older Mac OS system menu. Dialog boxes and other user-interface elements retain their traditional appearance.

The Classic Environment provides a way to run "Classic" applications on Apple's G5 systems as well as on most G4 based computers sold after January 2003. These machines cannot boot Mac OS 9 or earlier without the bridging capabilities of the Classic Environment or other software (see SheepShaver).

The Classic Environment's compatibility is usually sufficient for many applications, provided the application using it does not require direct access to hardware or engage in full-screen drawing. However, it is not a complete clone of Mac OS 9. The Finder included with Mac OS X v10.2 and later does not support the "Reveal Object" Apple events used by some Mac OS 9 applications, causing the "Reveal In Finder" functionality for those applications to be lost. Early releases of Mac OS X would often fail to draw window frames of Classic applications correctly, and after the Classic Environment's windowing was made double buffered in Mac OS X Panther, some older applications and games sometimes failed to update the screen properly, such as the original Macintosh port of Doom. However, the Classic Environment "resurrected" some older applications that had previously been unusable on the Macintosh Quadra and Power Macintosh series; this is because Mac OS X replaced Mac OS 9's virtual memory system with a more standard and less fragile implementation.

The Classic Environment's performance is also generally acceptable, with a few exceptions. Most of an application is run directly as PowerPC code (which would not be possible on Intel-based Macs). Motorola68k code is handled by the same Motorola 68LC040 emulator that Mac OS 9 uses. Some application functions are actually faster in the Classic Environment than under Mac OS 9 on equivalent hardware, due to performance improvements in the newer operating system's device drivers. These applications are largely those that use heavy disk processing, and were often quickly ported to Mac OS X by their developers. On the other hand, applications that rely on heavy processing and which did not share resources under Mac OS 9's co-operative multitasking model will be interrupted by other (non-Classic) processes under Mac OS X's preemptive multitasking. The greater processing power of most systems that run Mac OS X (compared to systems intended to run Mac OS 8 or 9) helps to mitigate the performance degradation of the Classic Environment's virtualization.

Dashboard[edit]

Main article: Dashboard (macOS)

Dashboard was an application for Apple Inc.'s macOS operating systems, used as a secondary desktop for hosting mini-applications known as widgets. These are intended to be simple applications that do not take time to launch. Dashboard applications supplied with macOS include a stock ticker, weather report, calculator and notepad; users can create or download their own. Before Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, when Dashboard is activated, the user's desktop is dimmed and widgets appear in the foreground. Like application windows, they can be moved around, rearranged, deleted, and recreated (so that more than one of the same Widget is open at the same time, possibly with different settings). New widgets can be opened, via an icon bar on the bottom of the layer, loading a list of available apps similar to the iOS homescreen or the macOS Launchpad. After loading, the widget is ready for use.

Dashboard was first introduced in Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger.[67][68][69] It can be activated as an application, from the Dock, Launchpad or Spotlight. It can also be accessed by a dashboard key.[70] Alternatively, the user can choose to make Dashboard open on moving the cursor into a preassigned hot corner or keyboard shortcut. Starting with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, the Dashboard can be configured as a space, accessed by swiping four fingers to the right from the Desktops either side of it. In OS X 10.10 Yosemite, the Dashboard is disabled by default, as the Notification Center is now the primary method of displaying widgets.

As of macOS 10.15 Catalina, Dashboard has been removed from macOS.[71]

Grab[edit]

Main article: Grab (software)

Grab is a utility program in macOS for taking screenshots. It supports capturing a marquee selection, a whole window, and the whole screen, as well as timed screenshots. The program originated in OPENSTEP and NeXTSTEP, and continued to be preinstalled by Apple on macOS until version 10.13 (High Sierra). It was replaced by the utility Screenshot in macOS 10.14 (Mojave). On macOS versions 10.13 and earlier, Grab is found in the folder Utilities, which is a subdirectory of Applications. It may be quickly opened by using the Spotlight function when entering grab, or by pressing ⌘ Cmd+⇧ Shift+G and typing /Applications/Utilities/Grab.app in application Finder. It was previously also found in the Finder menu under Services > Grab. As of Mac OS X v10.4 Preview had a submenu item (Take Screenshot) in the File menu, with selection, window, and timed screen.[citation needed] in more recent versions of macOS.

Grab saves screenshots in the Tagged Image File Format (TIFF). In macOS, it is also possible to save screenshots directly to the Desktop in PDF format (earlier versions of macOS) or PNG format (later versions), using keystrokes shown below. For DRM reasons, it is not possible to use this software while DVD Player is open.

Grab helps determine the size of an element on the screen. After using the selection feature and capturing the screen, one can select Inspector from the menu or press ⌘ Cmd+1 (or ⌘ Cmd+I); a dialog box will appear with the dimensions of the selected area.

iDVD[edit]

Main article: iDVD

iDVD is a discontinued DVD-creation application.

iSync[edit]

Main article: iSync

iSync is a software application first released by Apple Inc. on Jan 2, 2003. Apple licensed the core technology from fusionOne. It ran only under Mac OS X and was used to synchronize contact and calendar data from Address Book and iCal with many non-Apple SyncML-enabled mobile phones via a Bluetooth or USB connection. Support for many (pre-October 2007) devices was built-in, with newer devices being supported via manufacturer and third-party iSync Plugins. Support for Palm OS organizers and compatible smartphones was removed with the release of iSync 3.1 and Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. BlackBerry OS, Palm OS, and Windows Mobile (Pocket PC) devices could not be used with iSync, but were supported by third-party applications. Before the release of Mac OS X 10.4, iSync also synchronized a user's Safari bookmarks with the then .Mac subscription service provided by Apple. iSync was removed from Mac OS X in version 10.7 (Lion). However, since the underlying framework still existed in Lion and 10.8 (Mountain Lion), it was possible to restore the functionality of iSync using a 10.6 (Snow Leopard) installation or backup

iTunes[edit]

Main article: iTunes

iTunes is a media player, media library, Internet radio broadcaster, mobile device management utility, and the client app for iTunes Store. It is used to purchase, play, download, and organize digital multimedia, on personal computers running the macOS and Windows operating systems. iTunes is developed by Apple Inc. It was announced on January 9, 2001.

Because iTunes was criticized for having a bloated user experience, Apple decided to split iTunes into separate apps as of macOS Catalina: Music, Podcasts, and TV. Finder would take over the device management capabilities.[72][73] This change would not affect Windows or older macOS versions.[74]

Sherlock[edit]

Main article: Sherlock (software)

Sherlock, named after fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, was a file and web search tool created by Apple Inc. for the PowerPC-based "classic" Mac OS, introduced with Mac OS 8 as an extension of the Mac OS Finder's file searching capabilities. Like its predecessor (System 7.5’s totally revamped 'Find File' app, adapted by Bill Monk from his 'Find Pro' shareware find program[1]), Sherlock searched for local files and file contents, using the same basic indexing code and search logic found in AppleSearch. Sherlock extended the system by enabling the user to search for items through the World Wide Web through a set of plugins which employed existing web search engines. These plugins were written as plain text files, so that it was a simple task for a user to write a Sherlock plugin. Since most of the standard plug-ins for Sherlock provided by Apple itself no longer function, it was officially retired and removed in the release of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard in 2007.

Software Update[edit]

"Software Update" redirects here. For software updates in general, see Patch (computing).

In Mac OS 9 and earlier versions of Mac OS X, Software Update was a standalone tool. The program was part of the CoreServices in OS X. It could automatically inform users of new updates (with new features and bug and security fixes) to the operating system, applications, device drivers, and firmware. All updates required the user to enter their administrative password and some required a system restart. It could be set to check for updates daily, weekly, monthly, or not at all; in addition, it could download and store the associated .pkg file (the same type used by Installer) to be installed at a later date, and it maintained a history of installed updates. Starting with Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, updates that required a reboot logged out the user prior to installation and automatically restarted the computer when complete. In earlier versions of OS X, the updates were installed, but critical files were not replaced until the next system startup.

Beginning with OS X 10.8, Software Update became part of the App Store application. Beginning with macOS Mojave (10.14), it became part of System Preferences.

X11[edit]

Main article: XQuartz

In Mac OS X Tiger, X11 was an optional install included on the install DVD. Mac OS X Leopard, Snow Leopard and Lion installed X11 by default, but from OS X Mountain Lion (10.8), Apple dropped dedicated support for X11, with users directed to the open source XQuartz project (to which it contributes) instead.[75]

Development tools[edit]

Server technology[edit]

Core components[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"WebKit". WebKit. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  2. ^ abDarren Murph (December 6, 2010). "Apple Mac App Store: open for business starting January 6th". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved December 16, 2010.
  3. ^ abMuchmore, Michael (January 6, 2011). "Apple's Mac App Store: Hands On". PC Magazine. PC Magazine. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  4. ^Mac App Store Review (November 3, 2010). "Apple Now Accepting Submissions For The Mac App Store". MacAppStoreReview.com. Archived from the original on November 9, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  5. ^"Mac App Store Downloads Top One Million in First Day" (Press release). Apple Inc. January 7, 2011. Retrieved January 10, 2011.
  6. ^Shimpi, Anand Lal. "Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger Review". Retrieved 2018-05-09.
  7. ^Isaacson, Walter (2011). Steve Jobs. Simon & Schuster. p. 132. ISBN .
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

List of macOS components

Wikipedia list article

This is a list of macOS components—features that are included in the current Mac operating system.

/Applications[edit]

GarageBand[edit]

Main article: GarageBand

GarageBand is a line of digital audio workstations for macOS, iPadOS, and iOS devices that allows users to create music or podcasts.

iMovie[edit]

Main article: iMovie

iMovie is a video editing software application developed by Apple Inc. for macOS and iOS devices. iMovie was released in 1999.

Safari[edit]

Main article: Safari (web browser)

Safari is the default web browser included with macOS since version 10.3 "Panther". It uses the WebKit browser engine.[1]

/System/Applications[edit]

App Store[edit]

Main article: App Store (macOS)

The App Store is macOS's digital distribution platform Category Archives: MAC Tool macOS apps, created and maintained by Apple Inc. The platform was announced on October 20, 2010, at Apple's "Back to the Mac" event.[2][3] First launched on January 6, 2011, Category Archives: MAC Tool, as part of the free Mac OS X 10.6.6 update for all current Snow Leopard users,[2][3] Apple began accepting app submissions from registered developers on November 3, 2010, in preparation for its launch.[5] After 24 hours of release, Apple announced that there were over one million downloads.[6]

Automator[edit]

Automator is an app used to create workflows for automating repetitive tasks into batches for quicker alteration via point-and-click (or drag and drop). This saves time and effort over human intervention to manually change each file separately. Automator enables the repetition of tasks across a wide variety of programs, including Finder, Safari, Calendar, Contacts and others. It can also work with third-party applications such as Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop or Pixelmator. The icon features a robot holding a pipe, a reference to pipelines, a computer science term for connected data workflows. Automator was first released with Mac OS X Tiger (10.4).[7]

Automator provides a graphical user interface for automating tasks without knowledge of programming or scripting languages. Tasks can be recorded as they are performed by the user or can be selected Category Archives: MAC Tool a list. The output of the previous action can become the input to the next action.

Automator comes with a library of Actions (file renaming, finding linked images, creating a new mail message, etc.) that act as individual steps in a Workflow document. A Workflow document is used to carry out repetitive tasks. Workflows can be saved and reused. Unix command line scripts and AppleScripts can also be invoked as Actions. The actions are linked together in a Workflow, Category Archives: MAC Tool. The Workflow can be saved as an application, Workflow file or a contextual menu item. Options can be set when the Workflow is created or when the Workflow is run. A workflow file created in Automator is saved in /Users/{User Name}/Library/Services.

Starting in macOS Monterey, Automator is being replaced by Shortcuts.

The icon for Automator features a robot, known as Otto the Automator.[citation needed]

Books[edit]

Main article: Apple Books

Calculator[edit]

Main article: Calculator (macOS)

Calculator is a basic calculatorapplication made by Apple Inc. and bundled with macOS. It has three modes: basic, scientific, and programmer. Basic includes a number pad, buttons for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing, as well as memory keys. Scientific mode supports exponents and trigonometric functions, and programmer mode gives the user access to more options related to computer programming.

The Calculator program has a long history going back to the very beginning of the Macintosh platform, where a simple four-function calculator program was a standard desk accessory from the earliest system versions. Though no higher math capability was included, third-party developers provided upgrades, and Apple released the Graphing Calculator application with the first PowerPC release (7.1.2) of the Mac OS, Category Archives: MAC Tool, and it was a standard component through Mac OS 9. Apple currently ships a different application called Grapher.

Calculator has Reverse Polish notation support, and can also speak the buttons pressed and result returned.

The Calculator appeared first as a desk accessory in first version of Macintosh System for the 1984 Macintosh 128k. Its original incarnation was developed by Chris Espinosa and its appearance was designed, in part, by Steve Jobs when Espinosa, flustered by Jobs's dissatisfaction with all of his prototype designs, conceived an application called The Steve Jobs Roll Your Own Calculator Construction Set that allowed Jobs to tailor the look of the calculator to his liking. Its design was maintained with the same basic math operations until the final release of classic Mac OS in 2002.[8]

A Dashboard Calculator widget is included in all versions of macOS from Mac OS X Tiger onwards. It only has the basic mode of its desktop counterpart. Since the release of OS X Yosemite, there is also a simple calculator widget available in the notifications area.[9]

Since the release of Mac OS X Leopard, simple arithmetic functions can be calculated from Spotlight feature.[10] They include the standard addition, subtraction, division, multiplication, exponentiation and the use of the percent sign to denote percentage, Category Archives: MAC Tool.

Calendar[edit]

Main article: Calendar (Apple)

Calendar is a personal calendar app made by Apple Inc. that runs on both the macOSdesktopoperating system and the iOSmobile operating system. It offers online cloud backup of calendars using Apple's iCloud service, or can synchronize with other calendar services, Category Archives: MAC Tool, including Google Calendar and Microsoft Exchange Server.

Chess[edit]

Screenshot of Apple Chess

Apple Chess is a 3Dchess game for macOS, developed by Apple Inc. as a fork of GNOME Chess (formerly "glChess").[11] Its history dates back to OpenStep and Mac OS X 10.2. It supports chess variants such as crazyhouse and suicide chess. Apple redistributes the source code under its own Apple Sample Code License, after a special permission has been granted from the original authors of GNOME Chess (which is licensed under GPL3).[12][11] Apple ships with the game also the Sjeng chess engine (GPL).

Contacts[edit]

Main article: Contacts (Apple)

Contacts, called Address Book before OS X Mountain Lion, is a computerized address book included with Apple Inc.'s macOS. It includes various synchronizing capabilities and integrates with other macOS applications and features.

Dictionary[edit]

Main article: Dictionary (software)

Dictionary is an application that includes an in-built dictionary and thesaurus.[13]

FaceTime[edit]

Main article: FaceTime

Find My[edit]

Main article: Find My

First added to macOS 10.15, it tracks location of compatible devices connected via iCloud.[14]

Font Book[edit]

Main article: Font Book

Home[edit]

Main article: HomeKit

Home is the front-end for Apple's HomeKit software framework.

Image Capture[edit]

Main article: Image Capture

Launchpad[edit]

Main article: Launchpad (macOS)

Launchpad is an application launcher for macOS that was first introduced in Mac OS X Lion. Launchpad provides an alternative way to start applications in macOS, in addition to other options such as the Dock (toolbar launcher), Finder (file manager), Spotlight (desktop search) or Terminal (command-line interface).[15]

Mail[edit]

Main article: Mail (Apple)

Maps[edit]

Main article: Apple Maps

Messages[edit]

Main article: Messages (Apple)

Mission Control[edit]

Main article: Mission Control (macOS)

Music[edit]

Main article: Music (software)

News[edit]

Main article: Apple News

Notes[edit]

Main article: Notes (Apple)

Notes is macOS's notetaking app. It had first been developed for iOS, but had first been introduced to macOS starting with OS X Mountain Lion. Its main function is provide a service for creating short text notes in the computer, as well as being able to be shared to other macOS or iOS devices via Apple's iCloud service.

Photo Booth[edit]

Main article: Photo Booth

Photo Booth is a camera application for macOS, Category Archives: MAC Tool. It utilizes the front iSight camera to take pictures and videos.[16][17]

Photos[edit]

Main article: Apple Photos

Photos is a photo management and editing application that was designed based on the in-built app released for iOS 8. On macOS, Photos was first introduced to OS X Yosemite users in the Category Archives: MAC Tool update on April 8, 2015,[18][19][20] replacing iPhoto.[21][22]

Podcasts[edit]

Main article: Podcasts (software)

Preview[edit]

Main article: Preview (macOS)

QuickTime Player[edit]

Main article: QuickTime

The QuickTime player is an application that can play video and sound files.[23]

Reminders[edit]

Main article: Reminders (Apple)

Task-managing app introduced to OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion and iOS 5.

Siri[edit]

Main article: Siri

Introduced in macOS 10.12, Siri is a digital assistant that allows the user to interact with it to ask questions, make recommendations, and perform actions on the device. It had been previously included in iOS.

Stickies[edit]

Main article: Stickies (Apple)

Stocks[edit]

Stocks is an application that provides information regarding stocks of various companies around the world.

System Preferences[edit]

Main article: System Preferences

TV[edit]

Main article: Category Archives: MAC Tool TV (software)

TextEdit[edit]

Main article: TextEdit

Time Machine[edit]

Main article: Time Machine (macOS)

Time Machine is an application where the user can back up their files.[24][25]

Voice Memos[edit]

Voice Memos, introduced in macOS Mojave,[26] is a basic application with the capability of recording audio. In addition to this, it allows several editing functions, such as trimming and overwriting.[27]

/System/Applications/Utilities[edit]

Activity Monitor[edit]

"Activity monitor" redirects here. For the fitness device, see Activity tracker. For the generic system component, see System monitor.

Activity Monitor is a system monitor for the macOSoperating system, which also incorporates task manager functionality.[28][29] Activity Monitor appeared in Mac OS X v10.3, Category Archives: MAC Tool, when it subsumed the functionality of the programs Process Viewer (a task manager) and CPU Monitor found in the previous version of OS X.[30][31] In OS X 10.9, Activity Monitor was significantly revamped and gained a 5th tab for "energy" (in addition to CPU, memory, disk, and network).[32]

AirPort Utility[edit]

AirPort Utility is a program that allows users to configure an AirPortwireless network and manage services associated with and devices connected to AirPort Routers. It comes pre-installed on macOS, and is available to download for Microsoft Windows and iOS. AirPort Utility is unique in that it offers network configuration in a native application as opposed to a web application. It provides a graphical overview of AirPort devices attached to a network, and provides tools to manage each one individually. It allows users to configure their network preferences, assign Back to My Mac accounts to the network, and configure USB attached Printers and hard drives.[33] The current versions are 6.3.6 for recent versions of macOS, 5.6.1 for Microsoft Windows and older versions[34] of Mac OS X,[35] and 1.3.4 for iOS.[36]

On January 30, 2013, Apple released AirPort Utility 6.0 for macOS featuring a redesign of the user interface focused on increasing usability for novice users.[37] Reception was mixed with some media outlets reporting IT professionals and network administrators being frustrated over some removed features.[37] It was reported that most end users, however, wouldn't notice the feature omissions.[38] Users requiring the removed features can still access the previous version of AirPort Utility using a workaround.[39]

Audio MIDI Setup[edit]

The Audio MIDI Setup utility is a program that comes with the macOS operating system for adjusting the computer's audio input and output configuration settings and managing MIDI devices.

It was first introduced in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard as a simplified way to configure MIDI Devices. Users need to be aware that prior to this release, MIDI devices did not require this step, and it mention of it might be omitted from MIDI devices from third-party manufactures.

Bluetooth File Exchange[edit]

Bluetooth File Exchange is a utility that comes with the macOSoperating system, used to exchange files to or from a Bluetooth-enabled device. For example, it could be used to send an image to a cellphone, or to receive an image or other documents from a PDA.

Boot Camp Assistant[edit]

Main article: Boot Camp (software)

Assists users with installing Windows on their Mac using Boot Camp.[40] Boot Camp does not support Macs with Apple silicon processors. This is because Windows 10 does not currently have a commercial version of Windows 10 that runs on ARM based processors.

ColorSync Utility[edit]

ColorSync Utility is software that ships with macOS. It is used for management of color profiles and filters used in Apple's PDFworkflow, or applying filters to PDF documents.

The interface is composed of two parts: the document browser and the utility window. The document browser lets Category Archives: MAC Tool user zoom in and out of an image or apply a Filter to it. The utility window has several options: Profile First Aid, Profiles, Devices, Filters and Calculator.

Profile First Aid allows the user to repair ColorSync color profiles so they conform to the International Color Consortium specification.

Profiles allows the user to browse the profiles installed on the system, grouped by location, class or space, and graphically compare any two profiles.

The profile map is displayed as a rotatable, scalable 3D object and can be plotted in CIELAB, CIELUV, YXY, YUV and CIEXYZ.

The Devices section allows the user to see a list of all registered ColorSync devices such as displays and printers, and see what ColorSync profile is applied to each one. It is also possible to override the default setting.

The Filters section allows the user to build and modify PDF filters that are available to the rest of the operating system. Each filter can be set to appear in one of three domains: Application, PDF Workflows, and Printing.

Filters set to Printing will appear in the drop-down menu under the "Save as PDF." button in the standard Mac OS X print dialog box. Filters set to PDF Workflow will appear in the Quartz Filters drop-down menu in the ColorSync section of a print dialog box. The default filters that ship with Mac OS X are:

  • Black & White
  • Blue Tone
  • Create Generic PDFX-3 Category Archives: MAC Tool Tone
  • Lightness Decrease
  • Lightness Increase
  • Reduce File Size
  • Sepia Tone

User-created filters can have color management, image effects, PDF retouch, domain selection and comments.

The Color Management section allows assigning a profile, choosing a default profile, rendering intent, converting to a profile or intermediate transform.

The Intermediate Transform section allows adjustment of brightness, tint, hue, saturation, bilevel (high pass filter) or profile assignment, to either grayscale, RGB or CMYK, or all data in the file. This can be applied to either text, graphics, images or shading.

Complex filters can be created by stacking multiple effects. Any changes made to the PDF file can then be saved as a new PDF file.

Calculator can convert between RGB, CMYK and other color value schemes, and features an interactive color-picker for identifying a color on the screen, duplicating a feature of another bundled utility, DigitalColor Meter.

ColorSync is Apple Inc.'s color managementAPI for the Classic Mac OS and macOS. Apple developed the original 1.0 version of ColorSync as a Mac-only architecture, which made it into an operating system release in 1993. In the same year, Apple co-founded the International Color Consortium (ICC) to develop a cross-platform profile format which became part of ColorSync 2.0. The system Color Management Module (CMM) was "LinoColorCMM", which was developed by Linotype-Hell AG (now part of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG). The same CMM was used in Microsoft Windows 2000 and XP under the rubric of "Image Color Management" (ICM).[citation needed] Apple, with the help of Adobe had ported ColorSync 2.0 and its SDK to Microsoft Windows. With ColorSync 3.0, the Windows version which was initially planned was discontinued, Category Archives: MAC Tool. Category Archives: MAC Tool 4.0 is the latest version, introduced in Mac OS X 10.1.

Human color perception is a very complex and subtle process, and different devices have widely different color gamuts or ranges of color they can display. To deal with these issues, ColorSync provides several different methods of doing color matching, Category Archives: MAC Tool. For instance, perceptual matching tries to preserve as closely as possible the relative relationships between colors, even if all the colors must be systematically distorted in order to get them to fit within the gamut Category Archives: MAC Tool the destination device. Because the human eye is more sensitive to color differences rather than absolute colors, this method tends to produce the best-looking results, subjectively speaking, for many common uses, but there are other methods that work better in some cases. (This set of rendering intents is part of the ICC system, and is available on all systems with ICC.)

As dictated by the ICC system, the profile connection space in ColorSync is the CIE XYZ color space. All image input and output devices (scanners, printers, displays) have to be characterized by providing an ICC profile that defines how their color information is to be interpreted relative to this reference color space. This profile might be provided by the device manufacturer, but for better quality results, it might be generated by performing actual measurements on the device with a colorimeter. Thus, when an image is scanned on a scanner, the image file will include a copy of the scanner's profile to characterize the meaning of its color information. Then, before the image is sent to an output device, a matching process converts the color information at the time of rendering from the source profile (that attached to the image) to the destination profile (that attached to the output device) so that the resulting colors print or display as closely as possible to the original image.

Console[edit]

Console is a log viewer developed by Apple Inc. and included with macOS. It allows users to search through all of the system's logged messages, and can alert the user when certain types of messages are logged.[41] The Console is generally used for troubleshooting when there is a problem with the computer.[42] macOS itself, as well as any applications that are used, send a constant stream of messages to the system in the form of log files. The console allows you to read the system logs, help find certain ones, monitor them, and filter their contents.[43]

Clicking on "Show Log List" in the toolbar will bring up the Log List. The Log List opens a sidebar which shows Category Archives: MAC Tool of the different logs that the system maintains. This list helps in viewing the many different logs maintained in various parts of the system by bringing them all together to one place. By clicking on a particular log category, all of the logs will be shown.[44]

The System Log Queries contains all of the logs that have to do with the entire system. This includes system logs as well as individual application logs.[44]

Selecting All Messages gives a live look at your computer's activities, updated live. This includes all activities from both the system as well as any applications running. Logs in this section of the Console are all formatted uniformly. They all include a timestamp, the name of the process or application, and the actual message of the log. When the message displayed includes a paperclip icon next to it, it means that it is a shortened version of a longer report, and clicking the icon will show the complete report.[45]

In addition to viewing all messages, users can also create custom queries with any criteria that they like. These custom queries will filter the messages and will also Category Archives: MAC Tool shown in the All Messages section. In order to make a new query, choose "New System Log Query" from the File menu.[46]

Digital Color Meter[edit]

Main article: Digital Color Meter

Disk Utility[edit]

Main article: Disk Utility

Grapher[edit]

Main article: Grapher

Keychain Access[edit]

Main article: Keychain (software)

Migration Assistant[edit]

Main article: Migration Assistant (Apple)

Migration Assistant is an application for migrating information from another computer to the computer in use. It may be from a Windows computer or a Mac.

Screenshot[edit]

Available in macOS Mojave (10.14) and above,[47] the Screenshot app bundles features such as screen recording and taking screenshots. Screenshot is initialized whenever the user presses the keyboard shortcuts ++, ++, ++, or ++.[48]

Script Editor[edit]

Main article: AppleScript Editor

System Information[edit]

Main article: System Information (Mac)

System Information is an application that shows the system information about a Macintosh product.

Terminal[edit]

Main article: Terminal (macOS)

VoiceOver Utility[edit]

Main article: VoiceOver

VoiceOver is an application where the user can listen to spoken descriptions on the computer.[49][50]

/System/Library/CoreServices[edit]

AddPrinter[edit]

AddressBookUrlForwarder[edit]

AirPlayUIAgent[edit]

AirPort Base Station Agent[edit]

AppleScript Utility[edit]

Automator Application Stub[edit]

Automator Installer[edit]

AVB Audio Configuration[edit]

Bluetooth Setup Assistant[edit]

BluetoothUIServer[edit]

CalendarFileHandler[edit]

Captive Network Assistant[edit]

Certificate Assistant[edit]

The Certificate Assistant is a utility for creating and verifying digital Category Archives: MAC Tool.

ClimateProxy[edit]

Clock[edit]

ControlCenter[edit]

Control Center provides access to system controls, such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Sound, in a unified interface accessible from the menu bar. Some of these controls can be added to the menu bar by dragging them from Control Center. Additional components can be added in System Preferences.[51] Available controls include:

  • Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth
  • AirDrop
  • Do Not Disturb
  • Keyboard Brightness (available on Mac notebooks)
  • Screen Mirroring
  • Display
  • Sound
  • Now Playing
  • Accessibility Shortcuts
  • Battery (available on Mac notebooks)
  • Fast User Switching

ControlStrip[edit]

Control Strip provides controls in the Touch Bar for common settings like brightness and volume.[52]

CoreLocationAgent[edit]

CoreLocationAgent is responsible for displaying authorization prompts to allow apps and widgets to access location services.[53]

CoreServicesUIAgent[edit]

Database Events[edit]

DiscHelper[edit]

DiskImageMounter[edit]

Main article: DiskImageMounter

DiskImageMounter is a CoreServices application used to mount disk images.

Dock[edit]

Main article: Dock (macOS)

The Dock is the main method of launching applications on macOS.

Dwell Control[edit]

Dwell allows the pointer to be controlled using head or eye tracking technologies. A user can also trigger actions by dwelling or holding the pointer still for a specified amount of time which will trigger the programmed dwell actions.

EscrowSecurityAlert[edit]

Family (OSX)[edit]

Finder[edit]

Main article: Finder (software)

Finder is the default file manager and graphical interfaceshell of macOS.

FolderActionsDispatcher[edit]

FolderActionsDispatcher is responsible for monitoring changes to the filesystem to run Folder Action scripts, Category Archives: MAC Tool.

Games[edit]

HelpViewer[edit]

Main article: Apple Help Viewer

iCloud[edit]

Image Events[edit]

Install Command Line Developer Tools[edit]

This utility allows developers to easily install command line tools for building, creating, and editing Xcode projects through the terminal, but does not require Xcode to be installed. It is possible to execute this program by running in the terminal.[54]

Install in Progress[edit]

Install in Progress is another application included in macOS (and in its progenitors OPENSTEP and NeXTSTEP) that extracts and installs files out of .pkg packages. It was created by NeXT, and is now maintained by Apple Inc.[citation needed]

Installer Progress[edit]

Installer[edit]

Main article: Installer (macOS)

JavaLauncher[edit]

KeyboardAccessAgent[edit]

KeyboardSetupAssistant[edit]

Keychain Circle Notification[edit]

Keychain Circle Notification is involved in iCloud Keychain syncing.

Language Chooser[edit]

[edit]

loginwindow[edit]

The loginwindow process displays the macOS login window at system startup if auto-login is not set, verifies login attempts, and launches login applications. It also implements the Force Quit window, Category Archives: MAC Tool, restarts macOS user interface components (the Dock and Finder) if they crash, and handles the logout, restart, Category Archives: MAC Tool, and shutdown routines. [55][56]

Users are assigned their own loginwindow when they log in; if a loginwindow process belonging to a specific user is force quit, they will be logged out.[57]

ManagedClient[edit]

macOS Setup Assistant[edit]

Setup Assistant is the app that allows users that have installed a fresh copy of macOS or have just bought a new Mac to set it up and configure important settings like Computer Accounts, Apple ID, iCloud, and Accessibility settings. It is also run after major macOS system upgrades.

Memory Slot Utility[edit]

NetAuthAgent[edit]

NetAuthAgent is an interface for authenticating with network file servers and selecting shares.

NotificationCenter[edit]

NotificationCenter is an application that displays notifications from apps and websites. Users access Notification Center by clicking the clock in the menu bar on macOS Big Sur or the Notification Center icon in earlier versions of macOS, Category Archives: MAC Tool. Notification Center can be customized in System Preferences.

NowPlayingTouchUI[edit]

NowPlayingWidgetContainer[edit]

OBEXAgent[edit]

OBEXAgent is a server that handles Bluetooth access.

ODSAgent[edit]

ODSAgent is a server that handles remote disk access.[58]

OSDUIHelper[edit]

OSDUIHelper displays on-screen graphics when certain settings, such as volume or display brightness, or adjusted.

PIPAgent[edit]

PIPAgent manages the picture-in-picture feature available in Category Archives: MAC Tool Sierra Category Archives: MAC Tool later.

Paired Devices[edit]

Pass Viewer[edit]

Photo Library Migration Utility[edit]

Photo Library Migration Utility migrates iPhoto and Aperture libraries to Photos.

PodcastsAuthAgent[edit]

PowerChime[edit]

PowerChime, present on some MacBook models, is a macOS service that plays a chime when plugged in to power.[59]

Problem Reporter[edit]

ProfileHelper[edit]

RapportUIAgent[edit]

rcd[edit]

RegisterPluginIMApp[edit]

ReportPanic[edit]

ReportPanic is an app that displays a window when the system reboots from a kernel panic; it allows the user to send a report to Apple.[60]

Rosetta 2 Updater[edit]

Screen Time[edit]

screencaptureui[edit]

screencaptureui draws the user interface shown when taking a screenshot.

ScreenSaverEngine[edit]

ScreenSaverEngine is an application that handles screen saver access

[edit]

ScriptMonitor[edit]

Siri[edit]

Main article: Siri

Siri is the virtual assistant that is part of Apple's iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, macOS, and tvOS operating systems. Siri uses voice queries and a natural-language user interface to answer questions, make recommendations, and perform actions by delegating requests to a set of Internet services.

Siri was launched to macOS in 2016 with the release of macOS Sierra (10.12).

Software Update[edit]

Software Update is a section in System Preferences for Mac Software Updates, as well as updates to core Mac apps, starting in macOS Mojave (10.14); it also has an item in the Apple Category Archives: MAC Tool. From OS X Mountain Lion (10.8)[61] to Category Archives: MAC Tool High Sierra (10.13), the Mac App Store was used for Software Updates; prior to that, Software Update was a separate utility, which could be launched from the Apple Category Archives: MAC Tool or from the Software Update pane in System Preferences.

SpacesTouchBarAgent[edit]

Spotlight[edit]

Main article: Spotlight (software)

Spotlight in OS X Yosemite

Spotlight is macOS's selection-based search system, used for indexing documents, pictures, music, applications, and System Preferences within the computer.

System Events[edit]

SystemUIServer[edit]

SystemUIServer manages status items in the menu bar.

[edit]

TextInputSwitcher[edit]

ThermalTrap[edit]

ThermalTrap notifies users when the system temperature exceeds a usable limit.

UIKitSystem[edit]

UniversalAccessControl[edit]

UnmountAssistantAgent[edit]

UnmountAssistantAgent displays a dialog if there is a process preventing ejection of a disk and offers to forcibly eject the disk if the process cannot be quit.

UserNotificationCenter[edit]

VoiceOver[edit]

WatchFaceAlert[edit]

WidgetKit Simulator[edit]

/System/Library/CoreServices/Applications[edit]

About This Mac[edit]

About This Mac shows information about the Mac it is running on, such as the hardware, serial number, and macOS version.[62]

Archive Utility[edit]

Archive Utility (BOMArchiveHelper until Mac OS X 10.5) is the default archive file handler in macOS, Category Archives: MAC Tool. It is usually invoked automatically when opening a file in one of its supported formats.[63] It can Flex Compress Component for BCBuilder 6 2.6 crack serial keygen used to create compressed ZIP archives by choosing "Create archive of 'file'" (Leopard: "Compress") in the Finder's File or contextual menu. It Category Archives: MAC Tool located at in Mac OS X 10.10, in 10.5 and later, and in 10.4[64] Prior to Archive Utility's inclusion in Mac OS X v10.3, beginning with Mac OS 7.6, Apple bundled the freeware StuffIt Expander with the operating system.

Invoking Archive Utility manually shows Category Archives: MAC Tool minimal GUI letting the user change Archive Utility preferences or choose files to compress or uncompress.

BOM is an abbreviation of Bill of Materials. Bill of Materials files or .bom files are used by the macOS Installer program to document where files in an installer bundle are installed, what their file permissions should be, and other file metadata. Thus, a Bill of Materials is read by the Installer, and Archive Utility helps it by extracting the files specified in the BOM.

DVD Player[edit]

Main article: DVD Player (Mac OS)

DVD Player (formerly Apple DVD Player) is the default DVD player in macOS. It supports all the standard DVD features such as multiple audio, video & subtitle tracks as well as Dolby Digital 5.1 passthrough, DVD access URLs and closed captions. In some instances, Category Archives: MAC Tool, users can choose which VOB file to open. DVD Player is also fully compatible with DVDs authored by DVD Studio Pro and iDVD, including HD DVDs by DVD Studio Pro.

Directory Utility[edit]

Main article: Directory Utility

Expansion Slot Utility[edit]

Expansion Slot Utility allows manual allocation of PCIe card bandwidth. It is only available on certain Mac Pro models.

Feedback Assistant[edit]

Folder Actions Setup[edit]

iOS App Installer[edit]

iOS App Installer is a app that downloads .ipa files for iPadOS applications so that they can be run on Apple silicon-based Macs.

Network Utility[edit]

Main article: Network Utility

Screen Sharing[edit]

Screen Sharing is Swap & Fall 1.0 crack serial keygen basic Mac utility that may be used to control remote computers and access their files. To connect, one may enter a VNC or Apple ID and authenticate as a local user on the remote computer, or, if the computers are linked via the same Apple ID, automatically initialise the connection. It supports features such as a shared clipboard between the two computers and remotely transferring files, Category Archives: MAC Tool. The feature must be enabled in the Sharing preference pane in System Preferences.[65]

Storage Management[edit]

Ticket Viewer[edit]

Ticket Viewer is an app that displays Kerberos tickets.

Wireless Diagnostics[edit]

Other applications and accessories[edit]

Crash Reporter[edit]

Crash Reporter is the standard crash reporter in macOS.[66] Crash Reporter can send the crash logs to Apple Inc. for their engineers to review.

Crash Reporter has three modes of operations:

  • Basic — The default mode. Only application crashes are reported, and the dialog does not contain any debugging information.
  • Developer — In addition to application crashes, crashes are also displayed for background and system processes.
  • Server — The default for macOS Server systems. No crash reports are shown to the Category Archives: MAC Tool (though they are still logged).
  • None — Disables the dialog prompt. Crash reports are neither displayed nor logged.

The developer tool CrashReporterPrefs can be used to change modes, as can using the terminal command.

In basic mode, if Crash Reporter Category Archives: MAC Tool an application has Category Archives: MAC Tool twice in succession, it will offer to rename the application's preference file and try again (corrupted preference files being a common cause of crashes).

When reporting a crash, the top text field of the window has the crash log, while the bottom field is for user comments. Users may also copy and paste the log into their e-mail client to send to a third-party application developer for the developer to use.

Directory Access[edit]

Internet Connect[edit]

Main article: Internet Connect

NetInfo Manager[edit]

ODBC Administrator[edit]

Printer Setup Utility[edit]

Older applications[edit]

Classic[edit]

JPEGViewrunning in the Classic Environment

"MacOS Classic" redirects here. For the pre-Mac OS X operating system for Macs, see Classic Mac OS.

The Classic Environment, usually referred to as Classic, is a hardware and softwareabstraction layer in PowerPC versions of Mac OS X that allows most legacyapplications compatible with Mac OS 9 to run on Mac OS X. The name "Classic" is also sometimes used by software vendors to refer to the application programming interface available to "classic" applications, to differentiate between programming for Mac OS X and the classic version of the Mac OS.

The Classic Environment is supported on PowerPC-based Macintosh computers running versions of Mac OS X up to 10.4 "Tiger", but not with 10.5 "Leopard" or Macintoshes utilizing any other architecture than PowerPC.

The Classic Environment is a descendant of Rhapsody's "Blue Box" virtualization layer, which served as a proof of concept. (Previously, Apple A/UX also offered a virtualized Mac OS environment on top of a UNIX operating system.) It uses a Mac OS 9 System Folder, and a New World ROM file to bridge the differences between the older PowerPC Macintosh platforms and the XNUkernel environment. The Classic Environment was created as a key element of Apple's strategy to replace the classic Mac OS (versions 9 and below) with Mac OS X as the standard operating system (OS) used by Macintosh computers by eliminating the need to use the older OS directly.

The Classic Environment can be loaded at login (for faster activation when needed later), on command, or whenever a Mac OS application that requires it is launched (to reduce the use of system resources when not needed). It requires a full version of Mac OS 9 to be installed on the system, and loads an instance of that OS in a sandbox environment, replacing some low-level system calls with equivalent calls to Mac OS X via updated system files and the Classic Support system enabler. This sandbox is used to launch all "classic" Mac OS applications—there is only one instance of the Classic process running for a given user, and only one user per machine may be running Classic at a time.

If the user chooses to launch the Classic Environment only when needed, launching a "classic" application first launches the Classic Environment, which can be configured to appear in a window resembling the display of a computer booting into Mac OS 9. When the Classic Environment has finished loading, the application launches. When a "classic" application is in the foreground, the menu bar at the top of the screen changes to look like the older Mac OS system menu. Dialog boxes and other user-interface elements retain their traditional appearance.

The Classic Environment provides a way to run "Classic" applications on Apple's G5 systems as well as on most G4 based computers sold after January 2003. These machines cannot boot Mac OS 9 or earlier without the bridging capabilities of the Classic Environment or other software (see SheepShaver).

The Classic Environment's compatibility is usually sufficient for many applications, Category Archives: MAC Tool, provided the application using it does not require direct access to hardware or engage in full-screen drawing. However, it is not a complete clone of Mac OS 9. The Finder included with Mac OS X v10.2 and later does not support the "Reveal Object" Apple events used by some Mac OS 9 applications, Category Archives: MAC Tool the "Reveal In Finder" functionality for adobe acrobat x pro applications to be lost. Early releases of Mac OS X would often fail to draw window frames of Classic applications correctly, and after the Classic Environment's windowing was made double buffered in Mac OS X Panther, some older applications and games sometimes failed to update the screen properly, such as the original Macintosh port of Doom. However, Category Archives: MAC Tool, the Classic Environment "resurrected" some older applications that had previously been unusable on the Macintosh Quadra and Power Macintosh series; this is because Mac OS X replaced Mac OS 9's virtual memory system with a more standard and less fragile implementation.

The Classic Environment's performance is also generally acceptable, with a few exceptions. Most of an application is run directly as PowerPC code (which would not be possible on Intel-based Macs). Motorola68k code is handled by the same Motorola 68LC040 emulator that Mac OS 9 uses. Some application functions are actually faster in the Classic Environment than under Mac OS 9 on equivalent hardware, due to performance improvements in the newer operating system's device drivers. These applications are largely those that use heavy disk processing, and were often quickly ported to Mac OS X by their developers. On the other hand, applications that rely on heavy processing and which did not share resources under Mac OS 9's co-operative multitasking model will be interrupted by other (non-Classic) processes under Mac OS X's preemptive multitasking. The greater processing power of most systems that run Mac OS X (compared to systems intended to run Mac OS 8 or 9) helps to mitigate the performance degradation of the Classic Environment's virtualization.

Dashboard[edit]

Main article: Dashboard (macOS)

Dashboard was an application for Apple Inc.'s macOS operating systems, used as a secondary desktop for hosting mini-applications known as widgets. These are intended to be simple applications that do not take time to launch. Dashboard applications supplied with macOS include a stock ticker, weather report, calculator and notepad; users can create or download their own. Before Mac Category Archives: MAC Tool X 10.7 Lion, when Dashboard is activated, the user's desktop is dimmed and widgets appear in the foreground. Like application windows, they can be moved around, rearranged, deleted, and recreated (so that more than one of the same Widget is open at the same time, possibly with different settings). New widgets can be opened, via an icon bar on the bottom of the layer, loading a list of available apps similar to the iOS homescreen or the macOS Launchpad. After loading, the widget is ready for use.

Dashboard was first introduced in Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger.[67][68][69] It can be activated as an application, from the Dock, Launchpad or Spotlight. It can also be accessed by a dashboard key.[70] Alternatively, Category Archives: MAC Tool user can choose to make Dashboard open on moving the cursor into a preassigned hot corner or keyboard shortcut. Starting with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, the Dashboard can be configured as a space, accessed by swiping four fingers to the right from the Desktops either side of it. In OS X 10.10 Yosemite, the Dashboard is disabled by default, as the Notification Center is now the primary method of displaying widgets.

As of macOS 10.15 Catalina, Dashboard has been removed from macOS.[71]

Grab[edit]

Main article: Grab (software)

Grab is a utility program in macOS for taking screenshots. It supports capturing a marquee selection, a whole window, and the whole screen, as well as timed screenshots. The program originated Category Archives: MAC Tool OPENSTEP Category Archives: MAC Tool NeXTSTEP, and continued to be preinstalled by Apple on macOS until version 10.13 (High Sierra). It was replaced by the utility Screenshot in macOS 10.14 (Mojave). On macOS versions 10.13 and earlier, Grab is found in the folder Utilities, which is a subdirectory of Applications, Category Archives: MAC Tool. It may be quickly opened by using the Spotlight function when entering grab, or by pressing ⌘ Cmd+⇧ Shift+G and typing /Applications/Utilities/Grab.app in application Finder. It was previously also found in the Finder menu under Services > Grab. As of Mac OS X v10.4 Preview had a submenu item (Take Screenshot) in the File menu, with selection, window, and timed screen.[citation needed] in more recent versions of macOS.

Grab saves screenshots in the Tagged Image File Format (TIFF). In macOS, Category Archives: MAC Tool, it is also possible to save screenshots directly to the Desktop in PDF format (earlier versions of macOS) or PNG format (later versions), using keystrokes shown below. For DRM reasons, it is not possible to use this software while DVD Player is open.

Grab helps determine the size of an element on the screen. After using the selection feature and capturing the screen, one can select Inspector from the menu or press ⌘ Cmd+1 (or ⌘ Cmd+I); a dialog box will appear with the dimensions of the selected area.

iDVD[edit]

Main article: iDVD

iDVD is a discontinued DVD-creation application.

iSync[edit]

Main article: iSync

iSync is a software application first released by Apple Inc. on Jan 2, 2003. Apple licensed the core technology from fusionOne. It ran only under Mac OS X and was used to synchronize contact and calendar data from Address Book and iCal with many non-Apple SyncML-enabled mobile phones via a Bluetooth or USB connection. Support for many (pre-October 2007) devices was built-in, with newer devices being supported via manufacturer and third-party iSync Plugins, Category Archives: MAC Tool. Support for Palm OS organizers and compatible smartphones was removed with the release of iSync 3.1 and Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. BlackBerry OS, Palm OS, and Windows Mobile (Pocket PC) devices could not be used with iSync, but were supported by third-party applications. Before the release of Mac OS X 10.4, iSync also synchronized a user's Safari bookmarks with the Category Archives: MAC Tool .Mac subscription service provided by Apple. iSync was removed from Mac OS X in version 10.7 (Lion). However, since the underlying framework still existed in Lion and 10.8 (Mountain Lion), it was possible to restore the functionality of iSync using a 10.6 (Snow Leopard) installation or backup

iTunes[edit]

Main article: iTunes

iTunes is a media player, media library, Internet radio broadcaster, mobile device Category Archives: MAC Tool utility, and the client app for iTunes Store, Category Archives: MAC Tool. It is used to purchase, play, download, and organize digital multimedia, on personal computers running the macOS and Windows operating systems. iTunes is developed by Apple Inc. It was announced on January 9, 2001.

Because iTunes was criticized for having a bloated user experience, Apple decided to split iTunes into separate apps as of macOS Catalina: Music, Podcasts, and TV. Finder would take over the device management capabilities.[72][73] This change would not affect Windows or older macOS versions.[74]

Sherlock[edit]

Main article: Sherlock (software)

Sherlock, named after fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, was a file and web search tool created by Apple Inc. for the PowerPC-based "classic" Mac OS, introduced with Mac OS 8 as an extension of the Mac OS Finder's file searching capabilities. Like its predecessor (System 7.5’s totally revamped 'Find File' app, adapted by Bill Monk from his 'Find Pro' shareware find program[1]), Sherlock searched for local files and file contents, using the same basic indexing code and search logic found in AppleSearch. Sherlock extended the system by enabling the user to search for items through the World Wide Web through a set of plugins which employed existing web search engines. These plugins were written as plain text files, so that it was a simple task for a user to write a Sherlock plugin. Since most of the standard plug-ins for Sherlock provided by Apple itself no longer function, it was officially retired and removed in the release of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard in 2007.

Software Update[edit]

"Software Update" redirects here. For software updates in general, see Patch (computing).

In Mac OS 9 and earlier versions of Mac OS X, Software Update was a CAMTASIA 8 [May 2020] crack serial keygen tool. The program was part of the CoreServices in OS X. It could automatically inform users of new updates (with new features and bug and security fixes) to the operating system, applications, device drivers, and firmware. All updates required the user to enter their administrative password and some required a system restart. It could be set to check for updates daily, weekly, monthly, or not at all; in addition, it could download and store the associated .pkg file (the same type used by Installer) to be installed at a later date, and it maintained a history of installed updates. Starting with Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, updates that required a reboot logged out the user prior to installation and automatically restarted the computer when complete, Category Archives: MAC Tool. In earlier versions of OS X, the updates were installed, but critical files were not replaced until the Category Archives: MAC Tool system startup.

Beginning with OS X 10.8, Software Update became part of the App Store application. Beginning with macOS Mojave (10.14), it became part of System Preferences.

X11[edit]

Main article: XQuartz

In Mac OS X Tiger, X11 was an optional install included on the install DVD. Mac OS X Leopard, Snow Leopard and Lion installed X11 by default, Category Archives: MAC Tool, but from OS X Mountain Lion (10.8), Apple dropped dedicated support for X11, with users directed to the open source XQuartz project (to which it contributes) instead.[75]

Development tools[edit]

Server technology[edit]

Core components[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"WebKit". WebKit. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  2. ^ abDarren Murph (December 6, 2010). "Apple Mac App Store: open for business starting January 6th". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved December 16, 2010.
  3. ^ abMuchmore, Category Archives: MAC Tool, Michael (January 6, 2011). "Apple's Mac App Store: Hands On". PC Magazine. PC Magazine. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  4. ^Mac App Store Review (November 3, 2010). "Apple Now Accepting Submissions For The Mac App Store". MacAppStoreReview.com. Archived from the original on November 9, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  5. ^"Mac App Store Downloads Top One Million in First Day" (Press release). Apple Inc. January 7, 2011. Retrieved January 10, 2011.
  6. ^Shimpi, Anand Lal. "Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger Review". Retrieved 2018-05-09.
  7. ^Isaacson, Walter (2011). Steve Jobs. Simon & Schuster, Category Archives: MAC Tool. p. 132. ISBN .
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Extra Tools

Top 5 Best Cleaner Software to Speed Up your Mac

Macs are loved for their reliability and polish. But, like all computers, even Macs tend to slow down with age. When that happens, many people choose the nuclear option: a complete system reinstall. There are cases when a full reinstall […]

What is the Concept of Wear Leveling on an SSD Drive?

A Solid State Drive (SSD) is a storage device that is constructed without the use of moving mechanical parts. An SSD stores data electronically by employing flash memory, Category Archives: MAC Tool. Their architecture is a radical departure from the traditional storage devices previously […]

Make Your Mac Run Faster with These Tips

It’s not unusual for Mac computers to slow down over time when not properly maintained. To keep your Mac computer in an excellent condition, you must do a thorough cleanup once in a while, and this article explains how. How […]

Accents and Special Characters on Mac Computer

Do you own a Mac computer with the standard English keyboard layout and need to write Spanish or French accents and various special characters on a regular basis? Then you probably find yourself copy-pasting the characters and symbols you need […]

How to Copy and Paste on Mac Computers

There are two main methods how you can copy and paste text, documents, images, and other content Category Archives: MAC Tool applications and web pages. The Keyboard Method The first method involves three very handy keyboard shortcuts that you should definitely remember: Command-X […]

Easy Steps to Root Android Device with KingRoot App

If you’re looking to root your smartphone or tablet — Kingo Android Root might be the right app for you, Category Archives: MAC Tool. Traditionally, rooting your phone used to require some Linux knowledge and quite a lot of complicated setup. Even Guitar Rig 6.2.2 Crack Download | Pro Version (License Key), it […]

Everything You Need to Know about Rooting your Android Device

We all want to get the most out of our devices. Unfortunately, your Android device comes heavily locked down. For most people, Category Archives: MAC Tool, this is a good thing. No program can change important settings or tamper with system software, protecting you […]

Speed Up Your Mac

People rarely talk about this, but Macs do slow down over time. Your Mac may have started its life as a beautiful, fast Apple box, but it will collect files and corrupted data like a sponge as it ages. This […]

How to Right-Click on a Mac

Mac computers have a lot of things going for them. While more expensive than other computer brands, their unifying ecosystems ensure that your Mac computer will always work out of the box. However, as any new Mac user soon realizes, […]

5 Ways to Reset & Change a Lost Admin Password on Mac

Have you lost your Mac OS X admin Category Archives: MAC Tool Don’t despair; Category Archives: MAC Tool not the first person in this sticky situation. In fact, people lose passwords all the time — both to admin and regular accounts. Fortunately, there are multiple methods […]

How to Download & Install Old Versions of Mac OS X

One of the best aspects of owning a Mac is the great upgrade system it is. It will always give you the best, most recent version of OS X for your system, ensuring that you are always up to date […]

How to Uninstall Apps on Mac

You need to know how to uninstall programs on Mac computers to free storage space. On the surface, this seems like an easy task. You can uninstall most applications just by moving their folders to the Trash. However, this will […]

Are Disk Drill for Mac and Windows Identical?

How are Disk Drill for Mac and Disk Drill for Windows different? Are they the same app for different platforms? Or how do they compare feature-wise? Why is Disk Drill for Mac more expensive than the Windows Edition? Will they […]

Managing bad sectors in Disk Drill

As you know, you can always manually set memory sectors (or blocks) on your storage device as “bad” in Disk Drill. Or vice versa, you can always navigate to “Configuration gear -> Specify bad blocks” on your hard drives to manually remove […]

Disk Drill vs Data Rescue, DiskWarrior, R-Studio. Choose the best data recovery app.

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How to search Category Archives: MAC Tool duplicates and eliminate them

Disk Drill allows you to search for duplicated files and remove them in order to free additional disk space. This option is tightly integrated in Disk Drill, so that you can remove duplicates directly from the application. To check a […]

How to clean up your Mac for free with Disk Drill?

Starting with Disk Drill version 2.4, we have added a new feature to help you visualize the space on your drives and identify files that may be taking up a lot of space. Starting with Disk Drill 3 Category Archives: MAC Tool, the feature […]

How Can I Export Forensic Data (DFXML)?

Disk Drill is a data recovery tool with only TemplateToaster 8.0.0.20695 Crack With Full Activation Key [2021] “forensics” feature so far: it returns the layout information for recovered files in a machine-readable format for further processing (CSV, SQLite database or DFXML), Category Archives: MAC Tool. This allows for their forensic analysis […]

Known Issue: Can’t Run Programs (.app Files) from a Mounted Disk

If you have Disk Drill PRO and have recovered items to a DMG (disk image) you may notice that you cannot launch applications from the disk image. We have investigated this issue, but have not yet found a definitive answer. […]

How Do I Mount Scanning Results As a Disk and Recover From It?

One of the great features of Disk Drill PRO is that you don’t have to preview files in Disk Drill. You can instead recover them to a virtual disk and open the files in their native applications. Note that a third-party […]

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Forget Folders: The Best Ways to Organize Your Files with Tags and Labels

Trying to find old files is like trying to go back in time and read your own mind. Where would I have saved those pictures from Australia?!? you think, before spending a frustrating half hour digging through folders and folders of miscellaneous images. What would I have called that report I wrote Category Archives: MAC Tool August 2012?!?

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Tags (or labels in some apps) can eliminate these exasperating and time-consuming mental exercises. With a couple of tags, you can instantly categorize and label files for hassle-free searches down the road, and then find all of those files again easily no matter where you save them.

Let's explore why tagging is so useful, and how to set up your own tag system. Then, Category Archives: MAC Tool, we’ll dive into how to tag your emails, photos, notes, and files, and glance at the benefits of using tags alongside folders.



Intro to Tagging

Tags

Tags are keywords you assign to files. Think of them like characteristics for a person: Just like you’d describe someone as "tall," "funny," "brunette," and so on, you’d tag a file "important," "tax info," "just for fun," or "work."

But why use tags, when you could just use folders?

A file can only be in one folder at a time—but it could have an unlimited number of tags. Say you've made a project brief for a client and you want to save it in the specific project folder and to the client’s main folder. With folders, you'd have to pick one folder or duplicate the file, which could cause issues. Tags, on the other hand, are perfect for adding category data like this, since you can add as many tags as you want to a file. You could tag the document with both the project’s name and the client’s name, then save the file just in the project's folder.

Tags are the simplest way to add data to files without dealing with endless layers of folders. They're perhaps your most flexible tool for organizing your files.

Related: Folders are still essential, however. Here's how to best organize your files and folders.

Tagging Best Practices

Of course, the flexibility and unlimited nature of tags can be dangerous. It’s easy to spend fifteen extra minutes adding a ton of tags every time you save a new file—and it’s also easy to create so many different tags that you completely forget which ones you’ve used.

How to Establish a Tag System

Luckily, you can avoid these issues by establishing a system. Your first step: Figure out your high-level tags. These types of tags divide your content into the most general categories possible, which usually means by type. Examples:

  • A bookstore creates separate spaces for books depending on their genre: mystery, romance, Category Archives: MAC Tool, historical fiction, and so on.

  • If you’re making a tag system for your spreadsheets, your high-level tags might be "budget," "schedule," "estimate," "invoice," and "Gantt charts."

  • if you're building a system for documents, you could add tags for "reports," "blog Category Archives: MAC Tool "letters," and so forth.

Also consider making tags for the status of your files. I tag (or label) my emails as "Answer," "Done," "Pending," and "Ignore," for example. Being able to sort my inbox into these categories helps me stay on top of things.

Make Your Tags Consistent

Strive for consistency with your tags, Category Archives: MAC Tool. For instance, will you use singular or plural terms ("report" versus "reports"?) Which word type will you use: nouns, adjectives, verbs, or a combination of the three? Are you going to capitalize tags or leave them lowercase? Will you incorporate symbols and characters? The more standardized your system is, the easier it’ll be to find files.

As a rule of thumb, keep your tags to two words or less. If you find yourself going over that limit, Category Archives: MAC Tool, it may make more sense to create two separate tags—for example, rather than tagging something as "Q1 expense report," you could tag it as "Q1" and "expense report."

Once you’ve come up with 10-plus tags, it’s a good idea to create a master list. I use an Evernote note to keep track of all my tags. This list helps jog my memory if I ever forget a tag; plus, I can periodically look it over to find and delete tags I didn’t end up needing.

Use Tags with Folders

Ultimately, the FILE SCAVENGER 4.3 crack serial keygen concluded the best system involves folders *and* tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

Not everyone is a fan of using tags. Tiago Forte, founder of productivity training firm Forte Labs, explains, "When you rely heavily on tags, you have to perfectly recall every single tag you’ve ever used, and exactly how it is spelled and punctuated."

Plus, Forte says, it’s much easier to remember things with physical locations. That’s why you have to concentrate on memorizing a single phone number, but you can immediately recall where you left hundreds of items in your home.

"Tags force us to think about our notes in a completely abstract way," he argues. Folders, on the other hand, let us "place" our notes in a single physical location.

Forte definitely has a point. It can be time-consuming to tag every file—especially if you can’t remember those tags when you need them. If you’re producing a relatively small amount of work, using tags might not be productive.

However, there’s also a case to be made for a folder and tag system.

Four researchers from the University of Washington studied the comparative benefits folders and tags. According to their research, it’s easier to find files using labels rather than folders. Plus, picking out the right folder can take more work than choosing tags, because you have to select the "right" one. However, because folders let you visually put away your work, they Category Archives: MAC Tool Windows 10 pro free 2018 100% crack serial keygen feel more organized.

Ultimately, the researchers concluded the best system involves folders and tags. Use folders as broad buckets to classify your files; then, use tags to make them highly findable.

And great news: we’ve got a comprehensive guide to organizing your files and folders.


Now that you've got a tag system, let's put it to work. Here's how you can organize your email, photos, notes, and files with tags.

Tag Your Email Messages

We receive a lot of email each day—too much, in fact. With so many messages flowing in and out of your inbox, being able to quickly organize them with tags could make the difference between order and chaos.

Gmail introduced labels (which are tags) to email when it first launched in 2004, and today it's still the leader in tagging emails. Here's how to use its tag tools to sort your messages.

How to Label Emails in Gmail (Web, iOS, Android)

Gmail

To use labels in Gmail, you’ll have to manually tag each email or take a bit more time to create filters to add them. You can find the Labels option by clicking the gear icon, choosing "Settings," and navigating to the "Labels" Primo Ramdisk Server Edition Crack 6.3.1 Full Version down to the bottom and select "Create new label." You can choose when the label shows up Sex-machine Virtual FUCK v. 6.09 crack serial keygen your label list and inbox. If you have more than five labels, I recommend using the "show if unread" feature so they only show up when you have unopened emails.

Gmail also lets you color-code labels for a way to identify them at a glance. Find your label in the sidebar, hover over it, and then click the small three-dot icon next to its name. Then select choose "Label color." You can choose from pre-existing colors, or even create your own.

Tip: Learn how to get the most out of Gmail's labels—and add them to emails automatically with filters—in Zapier's Gmail Guide.

Of course, other email programs also offer tagging or labeling options. In Microsoft Outlook, for example, common tags—called Categories—are already set up for you, but you can edit them, create new ones, and color-code them Category Archives: MAC Tool Your Photos

Finding a specific picture can take forever. First, you have to remember where you saved it on your computer. Then, you have to dig through thousands of photos before finding the one you were looking for. Unless you name each photo, you can’t look up the title of a photo the same way you’d type in the name of a spreadsheet or presentation, so manually combing through your archives is typically your best option.

Tags make finding photos far speedier. Just tag each with its location, Category Archives: MAC Tool, subject, date, and the people in it, and you’ll have four different ways to locate it. Creating your own tags will give you even more options.

You'll find tags in advanced photo management tools like Lightroom, but here are some simpler apps to help organize your photo library.

Pixave (Mac)

Pixave

When you save multiple photos, you probably want to apply one or more tags to all of them. For instance, if you import 30 pictures from your last family reunion, you’d tag all 30 with "family Category Archives: MAC Tool the location, and the date. Pixave makes it easy to add multiple tags to multiple images at once, Category Archives: MAC Tool. With its drag and drop tagging, you can simply highlight the relevant tags and place them on the matching pictures.

When you’re exporting images, the app saves their tags as keywords in their metadata. That means you won’t have Category Archives: MAC Tool go through the hard work of re-labeling images once you’ve moved them to another platform.

And Pixave also automatically import images Download HitFilm Pro 15.2 Crack Archives a designated folder and apply tags for you. Talk about convenience!

Price: $14.99

Google Photos (Web, iOS, Android)

Google Photos

Technically, Google Photos is the anti-tagging tool. There’s no way to add tags within the app—the closest you can get is adding labels to people’s faces (e.g. "Daniel" or "Aja").

But Google Photos has such a powerful search, you'll feel like you've already added tags to every photo. It uses Google's AI to identify objects in your photos, so you can search for "watermelon" or "water sports" and find photos containing either in seconds.

It's magical—and if every app's search worked this well, you wouldn't need tags nearly as much.

Price: Free

Tip: The latest version of Apple Photos includes similar features, identifying locations and common objects in the photos on your iPhone, iPad, and macOS.

Tag Your Notes

You probably take notes all day long: in the morning, when you think of a random idea; on the subway, when you jot down a question; at your desk, when you write down your goals for the next day, and so on. Recording your miscellaneous thoughts is helpful—but only if you can find them again later.

Tags give you the power to organize a vast web of interconnected ideas, where saving notes in individual notebooks just won't cut it. Here's how to organize your notes with tags.

Evernote (Web, macOS, PC, iOS, Android)

Evernote clipper

This notebook app wants to be your digital memory, housing everything from simple checklists and detailed checklists to images, PDFs, documents, and more. Of course, the more content you collect, the more important tags become.

Evernote makes adding tags a cinch. If you use the app’s web extension, you can tag files while you save them. To tag a current note within the app, click the small "tag" icon next to the name of its notebook.

It’s also easy to browse your notes by tag. On the left menu sidebar, click on "Tags" to see all of your tags.

Evernote also lets you create nested tags, something you don't usually find with tags in other apps. For example, engineer Thomas Honeyman created a parent tag for "Projects" with three child tags: "Artistic projects," "Business projects," and "School projects."

To create your own tag hierarchy, open up the "Tags" page, then drag and drop the Category Archives: MAC Tool onto the main one.

Tags appear alphabetically by default. If you want, say, "Work task" to appear before "Grocery list," use a hashtag, period, or symbol. The tags with non-alphanumeric symbols will show up last.

Price: Free Basic plan for standard features for 2 devices and up to 60MB uploads per month; from $7.99/month Premium plan for unlimited devices, 10GB monthly uploads, and features like offline notebook access; $14.99/user/month for Evernote Business

For a deeper look at Evernote features and pricing plans, check out ourEvernote review.

See Evernote integrations on Zapier

Learn more about Evernote with our roundup of 30 Evernote Tips and Tricks.

OneNote (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android)

OneNote

Looking for a way to tag specific sections of your notes, rather than the entire document? OneNote lets you do just that—and a lot more. Its searchable tags make it easy to pull up every related snippet of your work, Category Archives: MAC Tool. For example, you can tag one part of your note with the "idea" tag and another as a "to do."

When you search OneNote for a tag, the Tag Summary page will show you all the related notes and give you the option of grouping tags, too.

Price: Free

Tag Your Files

The latest versions of macOS and Windows make it easy to add tags to almost anything.

Mac

Tagging on the Mac

Thanks to macOS' tagging feature, you can find any file on your Mac in just three steps. Step one: press command + space to open Spotlight. Step two: enter your tag (or tags). Step three: look through the results to find the right file.

But before you can become a master of the quick search, you’ll need to actually tag your files. It’s easy to add tags while saving a file: Just choose the relevant ones from the drop-down menu underneath the file’s name or type a new tag to add it to the list.

If you want to tag a file you’ve already saved, find it in your Finder window, right-click, Category Archives: MAC Tool, and select "Tags." You’ll be able to add existing tags or create new ones.

By default, the built-in color tags show up in your Sidebar menu. However, you’ll probably want to customize this section so it displays your most important or frequently used tags. To do so, open Finder, click "Preferences," and select "Tags," then drag-and-drop the tags into the order you want. You can also change each tag’s color.

Windows

Tags in Windows

Windows users can harness the power of tags as well. When you’re saving specific file types (including Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, Powerpoints, photos, videos, and new folders) you can add tags using the "Tags" field.

Looking to label a file you’ve already saved? Click on it to open its details, then you should see the option to type new tags under the "Date created" field.

For the majority of people, these options Category Archives: MAC Tool be enough. But if you want to tag non-supported file types, like plain text (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf) files, upgrade to a third-party tagging app.

Price: Free

The Best Apps to Tag Your Files

Not content with your computer’s built-in file management system? Luckily, there are plenty of third-party apps to choose from. These options all make it simple to add, edit, and find tags.

TagSpaces (Web, macOS, Windows, iOS, Android, Linux)

TagSpaces

Most of us take a squirrel-like approach to our files, saving some in Dropbox, some on our computer, some in Google Drive, some in Evernote, and so forth. That means it’s tricky to find files even flexisign pro 12 Archives tags—after all, Category Archives: MAC Tool, before you can search "resume" and "marketing jobs," you have to first remember where you saved all your resume drafts.

That's where TagSpaces comes in. This free app provides cross-platform file tagging and finding, so that you can organize everything the same way regardless of where it’s saved. In other words, if you type "resume" and "marketing jobs" into TagSpaces, it’ll search through every file you’ve ever saved to find the Category Archives: MAC Tool with those tags.

However, that’s not the only reason to download TagSpaces. It also lets you bulk tag files, which is handy when you’re downloading, say, photos from your hackathon, Category Archives: MAC Tool, or the presentations from a conference. Even better, you can create tag groups. To give you an idea, you could make a "sales team" tag Category Archives: MAC Tool containing tags for each individual sales rep.

Smart tags are also handy, Category Archives: MAC Tool. These automatic, time-sensitive tags let you quickly find files by when you saved them; for instance, if you wanted to locate a document you’d saved this morning, you’d search with the "today" tag.

Price: Free

Tabbles (Windows)

Tabbles

Visual thinkers, rejoice: Tabbles was designed with you in mind. Every tag is represented by a colorful bubble called a "tabble." When you want Category Archives: MAC Tool place a file into a tabble, you simply drag-and-drop it. That might sound a bit like putting a file into a folder, but files can belong to an unlimited number of tabbles at once.

What if you’re putting the same types of files into the same tabbles over and Category Archives: MAC Tool again? Rather than doing unnecessary work, set up tagging rules, Category Archives: MAC Tool. You can define which tabbles new files are housed in based on their name, file type, Category Archives: MAC Tool, content, or some combination of the above. As an example, imagine you want every Powerpoint file with "winter conference" in its name to be saved to the "Winter Conference" and "Work Presentations" tabbles.

Tabbles is free for up to 5,000 files. Paid options offeryou can save an unlimited number of files; plus, you can integrate with cloud sync servers and share your tags with your coworkers.

Price: Free for up to 5,000 files; from €1,5/month for paid options, which include more files, tag sharing, and syncing tags across multiple devices

Turn Tags into Actions

Does the thought of going through and tagging each and every file in your digital archives sound overwhelming? It did to me—so I decided to start fresh. Every new file I save gets tagged, but I don’t worry about the old ones. I’d definitely recommend this strategy if you’ve already got a full library of files and not enough time to categorize them all.

If you want to take your tagging to the next level, create a workflow that sends information you tag in one app to another with Zapier, an app integration tool. You can automatically send messages from Gmail with a specific tag (label) to a new card in Trello, for example, or create notes with a specific tag in Evernote from one of your other favorite apps.

Here are some ideas to help get you started turning tags into actions:

Organize Emails and Contacts

Save Tagged Articles

Share Tagged Posts


Happy tagging!

This post was originally published in August 2016 and updated for current app info and other details.

Title image by Metaphox via Flickr. Tags photo by Gustavo da Cunha Pimenta.

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How to add macOS line-of-business (LOB) apps to Microsoft Intune

Use the information in this article to help you add macOS line-of-business apps to Microsoft Intune, Category Archives: MAC Tool. You must download an external tool to pre-process your .pkg files before you can upload your line-of-business file to Microsoft Intune. The pre-processing of your .pkg files must take place on a macOS device.

Note

Starting with the release of macOS Catalina 10.15, prior to adding your apps to Intune, check to make sure your macOS LOB apps are revoice pro 4.2 crack Archives. If the developers of your LOB apps did not notarize their apps, the apps Category Archives: MAC Tool fail to run on your users' macOS devices. For more information about how to check if an app is Category Archives: MAC Tool, visit Notarize your macOS apps to prepare for macOS Catalina.

macOS LOB apps have a maximum size limit of 2 GB per app.

While users of macOS devices can remove some of the built-in macOS apps like Stocks, and Maps, you cannot use Intune to redeploy those apps. If end users delete these apps, they must go to the Category Archives: MAC Tool store, and manually re install them.

Before your start

You must download an external tool, mark the downloaded tool as an executable, and pre-process your .pkg files with the tool before you can upload your line-of-business file to Microsoft Intune. The pre-processing of your .pkg files must take place on a macOS device. Use the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac to enable Mac apps to be managed by Microsoft Intune.

Important

The .pkg file must be signed using "Developer ID Installer" certificate, Category Archives: MAC Tool, obtained from an Apple Developer account. Only .pkg files may be used to upload macOS LOB apps to Microsoft Intune. However, conversion of other formats, such as .dmg Category Archives: MAC Tool .pkg is supported. For more information about converting non-pkg application types, see How to deploy DMG or APP-format apps to Intune-managed Macs.

  1. Download the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac.

    Note

    The Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac must be run on a macOS machine.

  2. Mark the downloaded tool as an executable:

    • Start the terminal app.
    • Change the directory to the location where is located.
    • Run the following command to make the tool executable:
  3. Use the command within the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac to wrap .pkg LOB app file from a .intunemac file.

    Sample commands to use for the Microsoft Intune App Wrapping Tool for macOS:

    Important

    Ensure that the argument does not contain spaces before running the commands.


    • This command will show usage information for the tool.


    • This command will wrap the .pkg LOB app file provided in to a .intunemac file of the same name and place it in the folder pointed to by .


    • This command will extract the detected parameters and version for the created .intunemac file.

Select the app type

  1. Sign in to the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center.
  2. Select Apps > All apps > Add.
  3. In the Select app type pane, under the Other app types, select Line-of-business app.
  4. Click Select. The Add app steps are displayed.

Step 1 - App information

Select the app package file

  1. In the Add app pane, click Select app package file.
  2. In the App package file pane, select the browse button. Then, select an macOS installation file with the extension .intunemac. The app details will be displayed.
  3. When you're finished, select OK on the App package file pane to add the app.

Set app information

  1. In the App information page, add the details for your app. Depending on the app that you chose, some of the values in this pane might be automatically filled in.
    • Name: Enter the name of the app as it appears in the Category Archives: MAC Tool portal. Make sure all app names that you use are unique, Category Archives: MAC Tool. If the same app name exists twice, only one of the apps appears in the company portal.
    • Description: Enter the description of the app. The description appears in the company portal.
    • Publisher: Enter the name of the publisher of the app.
    • Minimum Operating System: From the list, choose the minimum operating system version on which the app can be installed. If you assign the app to a device with an earlier operating system, it will not be installed.
    • Ignore app version: Select Yes to install the app if the app is not already installed on the device. Select No to only install the app when it is not already installed on the device, or if the deploying app's version number does not match the version Category Archives: MAC Tool already installed on the device.
    • Install as managed: Select Yes to install the Mac LOB app as a managed app on supported devices (macOS 11 and higher). A macOS LOB app can only be installed as managed when the app distributable contains a single app without any nested packages and installs to the /Applications directory. Managed line-of-business apps will be able to be removed using the uninstall assignment type on supported devices (macOS 11 and higher). In addition, removing the MDM profile removes all managed apps from the device. The default value is No.
    • Included apps: Review and edit the apps that are contained in the uploaded file. Included app bundle IDs and build numbers are used for detecting and monitoring app installation status of the uploaded file. Included apps list should only contain the application(s) installed by the uploaded file in Applications folder on Macs. Any other type of file that is not an application or an application that is not installed to Applications folder should be removed from the Included apps list. If Included apps list contains files that are not applications or if all the listed apps are not installed, app installation status does not report success.
      Mac Terminal can be used to lookup and confirm the included app details of an installed app.
      For example, to look up the bundle ID and build number of Company Portal, run the following:
      defaults read /Applications/Company\ Portal.app/Contents/Info CFBundleIdentifier
      Then, run the following:
      defaults read /Applications/Company\ Portal.app/Contents/Info CFBundleVersion
    • Category: Select one or more of the built-in app categories, or select a category that you created. Categories make it easier for users to find the app when they browse through the company portal.
    • Show this as a featured app in the Company Portal: Display the app prominently on the main page of the company portal when users browse for apps.
    • Information URL: Optionally, enter the URL of a website that contains information about this app. The URL appears in the company portal.
    • Privacy URL: Optionally, enter the URL of a website that contains privacy information for this app, Category Archives: MAC Tool. The URL appears in the company portal.
    • Developer: Optionally, enter the name of the app developer.
    • Owner: Optionally, enter a name for the owner of this app. An example is HR department.
    • Notes: Enter any notes that you want to associate with this app.
    • Logo: Upload an icon that is associated with the app. This icon is displayed with the app when users browse through the company portal.
  2. Click Next to display the Scope tags page.

Step 2 - Select scope tags (optional)

You can use scope tags to determine who can see client app information in Intune. For full details about scope tags, see Use role-based access control and scope tags for distributed IT.

  1. Click Select scope tags to optionally add scope tags for the app.
  2. Click Next to display the Assignments page.

Step 3 - Assignments

  1. Select the Required, Available for enrolled devices, or Uninstall group assignments for the app. For more information, see Add groups to organize users and devices and Assign apps to groups with Microsoft Intune.

Note

Uninstall intend will only be displayed for LOB apps created with Install as managed set to Yes. For more information review App information section earlier Category Archives: MAC Tool this article.

  1. Click Next to display the Review + create page.

Step 4 - Review + create

  1. Review the values and settings you entered for the app.

  2. When you are done, click Create to add the app to Intune.

    The Overview blade for the line-of-business app is displayed.

The app you have created appears in the apps list where you can assign it to the groups you choose. For help, see How to assign apps to groups.

Note

If the .pkg file contains multiple apps or app Category Archives: MAC Tool, then Microsoft Intune will only report that the app is successfully installed when all installed apps are detected on Category Archives: MAC Tool device.

Update a line-of-business app

  1. Sign in to the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center.
  2. Select Apps > All apps.
  3. Find and select your app from the list of apps.
  4. Select Properties under Manage from the app pane.
  5. Select Edit next to App information.
  6. Click on the listed file next to Select file to update. The App package file pane is displayed.
  7. Select the folder icon and browse to the location of your updated app file. Select Open. The app information is updated with the package information.
  8. Verify that App version reflects the updated app package.

Note

For the Intune service to successfully deploy a new .pkg file to the device you must increment the package and string in the packageinfo file in your .pkg package.

Next steps

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Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How to Clean Up “Other” Storage on Mac [Guide]

Managing storage space on Macs can be tricky, especially if you own one of the lower storage capacity models. Even though Apple offers a native macOS tool to give you a detailed breakdown of how much space your system takes up, the overly extensive labeling of the Other category is perhaps one of the most confusing aspects of it all. So much so that it sometimes becomes challenging to determine the files that are actually hoarding all the space on your system, let alone finding a way to remove them.

Mac System Information storage breakdown

If you are running low on storage space and seeing the Other category holding up a significant chunk of your storage space, here is a guide to help you identify what constitutes the Other storage category, how to find the Other files, and how to clean them off your Mac.

What is Other storage on Mac?

Other is a category label in macOS’ System Information tool. It represents all those files that do Category Archives: MAC Tool fall under the standard storage category labels (Apps, Documents, iCloud Drive, etc.) but still consume a noticeable chunk of space on your system.

What exactly are these file types, you ask? Well, any types of files on your Mac that belong to one of the obscure categories like the user and system caches, disk images and archives, app extensions and plugins, and system and temporary files fall under the Other storage.

You can find these files by going into System Information.

  1. Click on the Apple menu and choose About this Mac.
  2. In the System Information window, click on the Storage tab. macOS will now identify the storage on your system and give you an overview of the consumed space.
  3. Click on Manage to view a detailed breakdown of the occupied space.

Mac System Information storage categorization

However, this approach of viewing storage breakdown is only partially useful since you only get to see the total space occupied by the Other category and don’t really have an option to see the exact breakdown of files that take up this space.

How to Find Files in the Other category on Mac?

Files in the Other category are typically found in two ways: by looking into different folders that Category Archives: MAC Tool up the Other category, or by using a third-party disk analyzer or cleanup utility.

1. Finding Other Files Manually

A majority of the files that take up the Other storage belong to Key Features of Adobe Zii Patcher Patch: Archives Mac’s Library folder. Here is a quick way to navigate to this folder:

  1. Open Finder.
  2. Click on Go in the menu bar and select Go to Category Archives: MAC Tool. Alternatively, you can access this using the shift + command + G shortcut in the Finder window.
  3. In the text field, enter ~/Library.
  4. Click Go.

Mac Library folder

Finder will now open to the Library folder. Here you will find a list of various folders. Most of these folders contribute to the Other storage category. However, you can find a major chunk of this category under two folders: Caches and Application Support.

2. Finding Other Files using a Third-Party Tool

There are various free and paid disk analyzer utilities for macOS that allow you to analyze your storage to find out the files that make up the Other category. Some of these utilities include OmniDiskSweeper, DiskInventoryX, CleanMyMac X, and MacClearner Pro.

How to Clean Other Storage on Mac

Now that you have broadly identified the kind of files that make up the Other storage on your Mac, it is time to remove them. Similar to the identification process, cleaning up can also be done in two ways. You can either go to each folder (that contributes to the Other storage) on your Category Archives: MAC Tool and selectively delete the files from there or use a third-party Mac cleaning utility to handle it for you.

1. Cleaning Other Storage Manually

As we have already mentioned, a significant chunk of the Other category files resides in the Library folder. To clean it up yourself, you just need to go to that folder (and its sub-folders — Cache and Application Support) and delete the unnecessary and redundant files. [Refer to the steps on how to get to the Library folder in the previous section.] Here are the steps to clean Other storage manually.

  1. In the Library folder, go into the Caches folder. Here, delete the cache files for apps you no longer use or have uninstalled from your Mac. [Note: It is wise to know which files you are deleting beforehand since removing cache will reset those apps. Likewise, you should also do a complete backup of your Mac before performing such operations, just to be on the safer side.]
  2. After you have cleaned up the temporary files from ~/Library/Caches and ~/Library/Application Support, it is time to check for the same in the /Library/Caches folder. Most of the time, it does not hold much cache. However, there are instances when it can get overpopulated.
    CleanMyMac X system cleanup
  1. Next, you can look for more Other files in the Backup and Downloads folders on your Mac. Open Finder, and from the sidebar, go to the Downloads folder under Favorites, Category Archives: MAC Tool. Here, select all the disk images (.dmg) and delete them: if you install a lot of apps but never bother to delete their installation images, this step should free up significant space for you.
  2. To delete old/unnecessary backup backups, open Finder and hit the command + shift + G shortcut. In the Go to Folder window, enter the following path ~/Library/Application Support/MobileSync/Backup to go to the Backup folder and click Go. Here you will find all your backups. Select the ones you don’t need and delete them.

2. Cleaning Other Storage Using Third-Party Utility

If the manual method sounds tedious to you and you do not want to risk dealing with your system, you can use a third-party cleaning utility to take care of the task. You can find a variety of such utilities on the Mac, Category Archives: MAC Tool. However, we recommend using CleanMyMac X or MacCleaner Pro, which are two popular and effective utilites.

CleanMyMac X system cleanup

Using these third-party apps is pretty straightforward. First, you need to perform a scan to identify all the temporary items (cached files and logs) and unwanted files that make up the Other storage on your Mac. Once the scan is complete, you are prompted to make a selection of the file types that you want to remove from the list of items. And that is it; the cleaning utility will now remove your selection and Category Archives: MAC Tool up your storage. Furthermore, if required, you can even use these apps to optimize storage on your Mac.

Keeping the Other Storage on Mac Clean

Maintaining your Mac’s storage space by avoiding the accumulation of junk or unnecessary files, such as those in the Other storage category, keeps your machine in good health and makes it function at its optimal level. If you own a lower configuration Mac, you should keep a tab on your system storage and clean out the clutter once in a while, Category Archives: MAC Tool. That way, you do not have to succumb to storage issues or crumble to performance throttling issues.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How Do I Password Protect Files and Folders on My Mac?

If you’re serious about safeguarding your sensitive information, password protection on your files and folders is the most sensible way to go.  

 

You shouldn’t consider this to be too cautious. Think of it this way: if you let someone use your Mac, how can you be sure they aren’t looking through your private files? Your device can also get stolen — along with all the files on your hard drive.  

 

So read on to learn about the macOS password protection features you need to use to stay safe.

How to password protect folders on Mac

First, turn your folder into a disk image file (.dmg). You can use Category Archives: MAC Tool method to create secure archives of files and folders (or even an entire disk, if you’d like).

  1. Find the folder you need to encrypt and add the relevant files to it
  2. Open Finder and go to Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility
  3. From the top menu, select File > New Image > Image from Folder
  4. Once the folder window opens, choose the folder you want to protect with a password Within the pop-up window that appears, you’ll see menus for both Encryption and Image Format  
  5. Select the level of encryption you want to implement (128-bit or 256-bit AES Encryption)
  6. Set a password for the folder
  7. Click the menu next to Image Format and select Read/Write
  8. Click Done and exit the window

 

Not so fast. You’re not done yet!

 

Remember: the original, unencrypted folder is still on your computer. Double-check to confirm you can access the disk image and files inside it. Only now, can you go ahead and delete the original folder.  

How to password protect files on Mac

While Disk Utility remains the most secure way to password protect files and folders on your Mac, there are few alternative methods to avoid unauthorized access.

 

How to password protect Notes

  1. Open the Notes app on your Mac
  2. Create a new note or choose an existing note
  3. Click the lock icon and select Lock Note
  4. You will be prompted to enter a password and select a password hint

You can also follow these steps to protect other iWork files, like Keynote or Numbers.

 

How to password protect PDF files

  1. Open the necessary PDF file in the Preview mode
  2. Go to the menu > File > Export
  3. Select the Encrypt checkbox
  4. Enter your password and click Save

You can easily password protect various files such as images, tables, or text. All you have to do is export them as a PDF, then encrypt that PDF file on your Mac using these steps.  

How to encrypt your Mac hard drive

Consider this the motherlode of password protection for your Mac. Using FileVault, you can encrypt the entire contents of your Mac and password protect access to Category Archives: MAC Tool hard drive. FileVault even allows you to erase your drive remotely via Find My Mac, preventing unauthorized access to your files in case your computer was stolen.  

 

Here’s how to password protect a hard drive Category Archives: MAC Tool Mac:

  1. Click the Apple icon to open the main Apple menu. Select System > Preferences > Security & Privacy
  2. Click on the FileVault tab
  3. Click on the lock icon in the bottom left corner of the window
  4. Enter your admin username and password when prompted
  5. Click to enable FileVault
  6. Choose the preferred method of unlocking your disk if you lose your password (iCloud for OS X Yosemite or a recovery key for OS X Mavericks)
  7. Restart your Mac

When choosing an alternative method of unlocking the disk, make sure it’s both secure and easy-to-access. iCloud can be the way to go unless you have trouble accessing your account. By storing the recovery key in a notebook or as a screenshot, you can reach it whenever necessary.  

 

Once your Mac starts encrypting your disk, expect things to run a little slower than usually for the first hour or so. After that, the operating speed will return to Category Archives: MAC Tool to encrypt your Mac external drives

If you use removable storage devices for keeping sensitive data, they have to be encrypted as well. Unfortunately, FileVault can’t password protect external drives on your Mac for you. So to secure this drive, you’ll need to take the manual route using Finder or Disc Utility.  

 

How to encrypt external drives using Finder

  1. Connect the drive you want to encrypt to your Mac
  2. Open Finder and right-click the drive from the Finder sidebar
  3. Select Encrypt
  4. Enter a strong password of your choice, plus a password hint
  5. Click Encrypt Disk

 

How to encrypt external drives using Disk Utility

NB! Since this method requires erasing your external drive, Category Archives: MAC Tool, you should only use it for new or empty drives. And if you want to partition other drives, make sure you copy all the data before starting the encryption process.

  1. Connect the drive you want to encrypt to your Mac
  2. Open Finder and go to Applications > Utilities > Category Archives: MAC Tool Utility
  3. Select the drive you want ample sound Archives encrypt and click Erase
  4. In the pop-up window, provide a name and select Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted) from the Format drop-down list
  5. Click Erase
  6. Enter a strong password and a hint if you need one
  7. Click Choose

From now on, you’ll need to enter the password every time you restart your Mac or connect the drive.

 

How to encrypt disk images using Disk Utility

  1. Open Finder and go to Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility
  2. Go to the menu > File > New Image > Blank Category Archives: MAC Tool the pop-up window, you can set up disc image configurations in a specific order:
    • In the Save As field, write the name of the disc image file
    • In the Where drop-down list, Category Archives: MAC Tool, select the necessary location
    • In the Name field, write the name to be shown when you open the disc image
    • In the Image Format drop-down list, select sparse disc image
    • In the Size field, set the maximum size you want the disk image to hold in the future
    • In the Image Format drop-down list, select “read/write”
    • In the Encryption drop-down Category Archives: MAC Tool, select the encryption level (128-bit encryption for large files or 256-bit encryption for super-secret files). Provide a strong password
  3. Once you’re done with the password, click Save and then click Done once the operation is successfully finished

This option allows you to protect disks in use as their size grows along with the content you add.

How to encrypt your Time Machine backups

Securing your backup system on Mac is also an excellent idea.

  1. Go to the Menu bar and click on the Apple icon > System Preferences > Time Machine (near the bottom of the drop-down menu)
  2. Click on Select Backup Disk
  3. Choose the disk you plan on using for your backup, then select the Backup Automatically option
  4. Check the Encrypt Backups option in the bottom left corner of your screen
  5. Enter a secure password, and you’re done!

How to back up to a server or Airport Time Capsule

  1. Go to the Menu bar and click on Category Archives: MAC Tool Apple icon > System Preferences > Time Machine
  2. Click on Select Backup Disk and select your server or Airport Time Capsule backup destination
  3. Click Use Disk and log in to your server or Airport Time Capsule
  4. Once you’re logged in, enter a password to encrypt your backup disk.
  5. Select Encrypt Disk

 

Your Mac will instantly start the backup process and store it as an encrypted Sparse Bundle Image (a disk image on your Mac containing backed up data).  

 

* * *

 

That’s it, your Mac folders and files are now strictly for your eyes only! But don't forget that password protecting your Mac files is just one piece of the security puzzle. To be truly safe online, you’ll also want to use a Virtual Private Network (or VPN) and other cybersecurity products to protect your identity and keep cybercriminals at bay, Category Archives: MAC Tool.  

 

And if you’re looking for a simple app that provides far-ranging protection, try Clario out. It ensures your identity, network, and file protection across devices.

 

Read more:

By Mary Atamaniuk

Updated: Mar 31, 2021

10 min read

Updated: Mar 31, 2021

10 min read

A digital content writer passionate about tech, marketing, and cybersecurity.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

The Files That Make Up the ‘Other’ Storage Category, and How to Remove Them

One of the niceties in the Mac OS is the ability of the system to display how your storage space is being used, Category Archives: MAC Tool. Originally introduced in OS X Lion as part of a feature upgrade to the System Information app, the Storage tab displays how much free space is available on each disk attached to your Mac, as Category Archives: MAC Tool as how a disk’s storage is being used, by category.

If you’re not sure how to find the categories, click the Apple logo in the menu bar in the Finder, select About This Mac from the dropdown menu, and then click the Storage tab. Mouse over a color bar, and a text balloon will pop up, telling you what the category is and how much disk space it’s using.

The categories change as new versions of the OS are released, but the current categories include System files, Documents, Apps, iTunes, Backups, Other, Audio, Music Creation, Photos, Movies, and Purgeable space.

Purgeable space is more or less unique to the Mac; you can find out more about it in the Rocket Yard Guide: What is Purgeable Space in macOS? The next category that seems to get a lot of attention is Other. So, just what is included in Other?

That’s a common question, one you may often ask yourself, especially when you need to free up space when your drive starts to fill up. When that happens, I think most of us tend to look at the Other category and think, there’s a lot of space being used by Other. If I don’t know what it is, and the system doesn’t seem to know either, then why can’t I just delete those files?

What’s in the Other Category
The type of files the operating system assigns to the Other category in the Storage display changes a bit from OS version to OS version, but there was a big shakeup in storage management when Apple introduced macOS Sierra, which caused the Other category to become better defined.

Because of the changes, we’re going to provide two lists for the type of files that are assigned to the Other category: pre macOS (OS X) and post macOS.

Other File Types in OS X
The Other category in OS X was a catchall; it included the following:

  • PDF, doc, and PSD documents and files; essentially most document types that weren’t stored within the Documents folder in a user’s home folder.
  • Disk images, archives, and compressed files, including zip, dmg, pkg, and iso.
  • Files located in the System folder that weren’t installed with the system. This could include most temporary files, swap files, even voice files you added to personalize your Mac’s speaking voice.
  • User installed items, such as screen savers, wallpaper, most iCloud support files, and Application Pdf expert for mac crack Archives files added along with app installations.
  • Both user and system caches, browser caches, and other cache files created by various apps.
  • App plug-ins, app extensions, and app add-ons; this includes all browser add-ons.
  • Any file type not recognized by Spotlight. This includes Boot Camp files, Windows partitions and files, and virtual machine files.

The above list gives you an idea of what may be in the Other category under OS X, and why the Other category tended to be quite large sometimes.

Other File Types in macOS
When macOS was introduced, the Other category, along with the entire Storage system, received Category Archives: MAC Tool bit of a makeover. Apple went through how files were allocated to categories, and moved many of the former Other files to more appropriate categories. This change was mostly made to accommodate the new Store in iCloud and Optimize Storage features that allowed infrequently used files to be moved to the cloud automatically and free up local space.

The Other category is now used for:

  • Web browser caches and most caches created by apps.
  • Apple Music streams.
  • Photos previews.
  • Most items in the Downloads folder, including installer packages.
  • iOS device backups.

How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other
From the Apple menu, select About This Mac.

OS X Mavericks and earlier: Click the More Info button, and then select the Storage tab.

OS X Yosemite and later: Click the Storage tab.

A stacked bar graph will be displayed for each disk attached to your Mac. It may take a few moments for the bar graph to fill in. When complete, the graph will show how each disk’s storage is being used, broken down by category, including the Other category.

Removing Other Files
Chances are most of the space reported under Other is going to be coming from cache and temporary files, downloaded files, and iOS device backups. We’re going to concentrate on those three types, and show you how to remove their unwanted files.

Cache and Temporary Files: The Rocket Yard has a great guide to finding and removing cache and temp files, so we’re going to direct you to: Tech 101: How to Clear Cache and Temp Files from Mac OS.

Downloaded Files: Some of us tend to download a lot of files. For me, it comes from trying out a lot of different apps. Most of the time, I don’t find the apps that useful and end up deleting them from the /Applications folder. But too many times, the installer package gets left behind in the Downloads folder. To delete the installers, or any other files you’ve downloaded and forgotten about, follow these steps:

Open a Finder window and select Downloads from the sidebar, or select Downloads from the Finder’s Go menu.

Examine the list of files and folders in the Downloads folder. To help you decide which files should be deleted, you can select the Size column to organize the list by the size of the files. This makes it easy to find the largest files that may be impacting your storage space.

When you find Category Archives: MAC Tool file you wish to remove, right-click (or control-click) on the file and select Move to Trash from the popup menu. You can also drag the file directly to the trash.

Don’t forget to empty the trash to permanently remove the files from your Mac and free up disk space.

The Mac offers another method for removing downloaded files using the Reduce Clutter feature in the Manage Storage tool; we’ll cover that option below.

Device Backups: If you’re using an iOS device, chances are you have multiple backups of the device stored within your iTunes app. Device backups can be a big part of the Other category, depending on how many different devices you have backed up.

Launch iTunes, and select Preferences from the iTunes menu.

Select the Devices button in the Preferences windows toolbar.

Select the device backups you wish to delete from the Category Archives: MAC Tool. It’s a good idea not to delete the most recent backup, unless the device has also been backed up to your iCloud account.

Make your selection(s), and then click the Delete Backup button.

Reduce Clutter
The Mac has a number of storage tools you can use to help manage your storage space, Category Archives: MAC Tool. One of these is the Reduce Clutter tool, which can help you find, view, Category Archives: MAC Tool, and delete files. To access the Reduce Clutter tool, perform the following steps:

Open the Storage view as outlined above, under the heading: How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other.

In the System Information window, make sure the Storage tab is selected, and then click the Manage button.

In the window that opens, select Recommendations, which can be found at the top of the sidebar.

Recommendations will reveal a number of options, including Store in iCloud, Optimize Storage, Empty Trash Automatically, and the option we’re interested in, Reduce Clutter.

Click the Review Files button in the Reduce Clutter section.

Select the Documents item in the sidebar.

There are three filters you can apply to help you in finding files to remove: Large Files, Category Archives: MAC Tool, Downloads, and File Browser.

Large Files: This filter shows files on your Mac organized with the largest files displayed first, a pretty good way to make big changes to how much space is being taken up on your disk.

Downloads: This will display files in your Downloads folder. The files are organized in the display in groups: Older than 1 year, Category Archives: MAC Tool, Older than 6 months, Older than 3 months, and Recent. Within each group, files are presented from largest to smallest.

File Browser: This sets up the display of files similar to how the Finder shows files in Column View mode. Files are organized by size, with the largest appearing on top.

When in the Large Files or Downloads view, you can examine a file or move it to the trash by hovering over the file name. After a moment, two small icons will be displayed: an X, which when clicked will move the selected file to the trash, and a magnifying glass, which when clicked will open a Finder window with the selected file highlighted. When in File Browser mode, right-clicking on a file will produce a popup menu with a single option, Category Archives: MAC Tool, to move the file to the trash

Although the Reduce Clutter feature doesn’t offer an automatic method of removing unused or unwanted files, its filtering system lets you quickly discover the files that are taking up the most space; it also provides a convenient way to remove them.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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The Files That Make Up the ‘Other’ Storage Category, and How to Remove Them

One of the niceties in the Mac OS is the ability of the system to display how your storage space is being used. Originally introduced in OS X Lion as part of a feature upgrade to the System Information app, the Storage tab displays how much free space is available on each disk attached to your Mac, as well as how a disk’s storage is being used, by category.

If you’re not sure how to find the categories, click the Apple logo in the menu bar in the Finder, select About This Mac from the dropdown menu, and then click the Storage tab. Mouse over a color bar, and a text balloon will pop up, telling you what the category is and how much disk space it’s using.

The categories change as new versions of the OS are released, but the current categories include System files, Documents, Apps, iTunes, Backups, Other, Audio, Music Creation, Photos, Movies, and Purgeable space.

Purgeable space is more or less unique to the Mac; you can find out more about it in the Rocket Yard Guide: What is Purgeable Space in macOS? The next category that seems to get a lot of attention is Other. So, just what is included in Other?

That’s a common question, one you may often ask yourself, especially when you need to free up space when your drive starts to fill up. When that happens, I think most of us tend to look at the Other category and think, there’s a lot of space being used by Other. If I don’t know what it is, and the system doesn’t seem to know either, then why can’t I just delete those files?

What’s in the Other Category
The type of files the operating system assigns to the Other category in the Storage display changes a bit from OS version to OS version, but there was a big shakeup in storage management when Apple introduced macOS Sierra, which caused the Other category to become better defined.

Because of the changes, we’re going to provide two lists for the type of files that are assigned to the Other category: pre macOS (OS X) and post macOS.

Other File Types in OS X
The Other category in OS X was a catchall; it included the following:

  • PDF, doc, and PSD documents and files; essentially most document types that weren’t stored within the Documents folder in a user’s home folder.
  • Disk images, archives, and compressed files, including zip, dmg, pkg, and iso.
  • Files located in the System folder that weren’t installed with the system. This could include most temporary files, swap files, even voice files you added to personalize your Mac’s speaking voice.
  • User installed items, such as screen savers, wallpaper, most iCloud support files, and Application Support files added along with app installations.
  • Both user and system caches, browser caches, and other cache files created by various apps.
  • App plug-ins, app extensions, and app add-ons; this includes all browser add-ons.
  • Any file type not recognized by Spotlight. This includes Boot Camp files, Windows partitions and files, and virtual machine files.

The above list gives you an idea of what may be in the Other category under OS X, and why the Other category tended to be quite large sometimes.

Other File Types in macOS
When macOS was introduced, the Other category, along with the entire Storage system, received a bit of a makeover. Apple went through how files were allocated to categories, and moved many of the former Other files to more appropriate categories. This change was mostly made to accommodate the new Store in iCloud and Optimize Storage features that allowed infrequently used files to be moved to the cloud automatically and free up local space.

The Other category is now used for:

  • Web browser caches and most caches created by apps.
  • Apple Music streams.
  • Photos previews.
  • Most items in the Downloads folder, including installer packages.
  • iOS device backups.

How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other
From the Apple menu, select About This Mac.

OS X Mavericks and earlier: Click the More Info button, and then select the Storage tab.

OS X Yosemite and later: Click the Storage tab.

A stacked bar graph will be displayed for each disk attached to your Mac. It may take a few moments for the bar graph to fill in. When complete, the graph will show how each disk’s storage is being used, broken down by category, including the Other category.

Removing Other Files
Chances are most of the space reported under Other is going to be coming from cache and temporary files, downloaded files, and iOS device backups. We’re going to concentrate on those three types, and show you how to remove their unwanted files.

Cache and Temporary Files: The Rocket Yard has a great guide to finding and removing cache and temp files, so we’re going to direct you to: Tech 101: How to Clear Cache and Temp Files from Mac OS.

Downloaded Files: Some of us tend to download a lot of files. For me, it comes from trying out a lot of different apps. Most of the time, I don’t find the apps that useful and end up deleting them from the /Applications folder. But too many times, the installer package gets left behind in the Downloads folder. To delete the installers, or any other files you’ve downloaded and forgotten about, follow these steps:

Open a Finder window and select Downloads from the sidebar, or select Downloads from the Finder’s Go menu.

Examine the list of files and folders in the Downloads folder. To help you decide which files should be deleted, you can select the Size column to organize the list by the size of the files. This makes it easy to find the largest files that may be impacting your storage space.

When you find a file you wish to remove, right-click (or control-click) on the file and select Move to Trash from the popup menu. You can also drag the file directly to the trash.

Don’t forget to empty the trash to permanently remove the files from your Mac and free up disk space.

The Mac offers another method for removing downloaded files using the Reduce Clutter feature in the Manage Storage tool; we’ll cover that option below.

Device Backups: If you’re using an iOS device, chances are you have multiple backups of the device stored within your iTunes app. Device backups can be a big part of the Other category, depending on how many different devices you have backed up.

Launch iTunes, and select Preferences from the iTunes menu.

Select the Devices button in the Preferences windows toolbar.

Select the device backups you wish to delete from the list. It’s a good idea not to delete the most recent backup, unless the device has also been backed up to your iCloud account.

Make your selection(s), and then click the Delete Backup button.

Reduce Clutter
The Mac has a number of storage tools you can use to help manage your storage space. One of these is the Reduce Clutter tool, which can help you find, view, and delete files. To access the Reduce Clutter tool, perform the following steps:

Open the Storage view as outlined above, under the heading: How to View the Amount of Storage Space Taken Up by Other.

In the System Information window, make sure the Storage tab is selected, and then click the Manage button.

In the window that opens, select Recommendations, which can be found at the top of the sidebar.

Recommendations will reveal a number of options, including Store in iCloud, Optimize Storage, Empty Trash Automatically, and the option we’re interested in, Reduce Clutter.

Click the Review Files button in the Reduce Clutter section.

Select the Documents item in the sidebar.

There are three filters you can apply to help you in finding files to remove: Large Files, Downloads, and File Browser.

Large Files: This filter shows files on your Mac organized with the largest files displayed first, a pretty good way to make big changes to how much space is being taken up on your disk.

Downloads: This will display files in your Downloads folder. The files are organized in the display in groups: Older than 1 year, Older than 6 months, Older than 3 months, and Recent. Within each group, files are presented from largest to smallest.

File Browser: This sets up the display of files similar to how the Finder shows files in Column View mode. Files are organized by size, with the largest appearing on top.

When in the Large Files or Downloads view, you can examine a file or move it to the trash by hovering over the file name. After a moment, two small icons will be displayed: an X, which when clicked will move the selected file to the trash, and a magnifying glass, which when clicked will open a Finder window with the selected file highlighted. When in File Browser mode, right-clicking on a file will produce a popup menu with a single option, to move the file to the trash

Although the Reduce Clutter feature doesn’t offer an automatic method of removing unused or unwanted files, its filtering system lets you quickly discover the files that are taking up the most space; it also provides a convenient way to remove them.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

List of macOS components

Wikipedia list article

This is a list of macOS components—features that are included in the current Mac operating system.

/Applications[edit]

GarageBand[edit]

Main article: GarageBand

GarageBand is a line of digital audio workstations for macOS, iPadOS, and iOS devices that allows users to create music or podcasts.

iMovie[edit]

Main article: iMovie

iMovie is a video editing software application developed by Apple Inc. for macOS and iOS devices. iMovie was released in 1999.

Safari[edit]

Main article: Safari (web browser)

Safari is the default web browser included with macOS since version 10.3 "Panther". It uses the WebKit browser engine.[1]

/System/Applications[edit]

App Store[edit]

Main article: App Store (macOS)

The App Store is macOS's digital distribution platform for macOS apps, created and maintained by Apple Inc. The platform was announced on October 20, 2010, at Apple's "Back to the Mac" event.[2][3] First launched on January 6, 2011, as part of the free Mac OS X 10.6.6 update for all current Snow Leopard users,[2][3] Apple began accepting app submissions from registered developers on November 3, 2010, in preparation for its launch.[5] After 24 hours of release, Apple announced that there were over one million downloads.[6]

Automator[edit]

Automator is an app used to create workflows for automating repetitive tasks into batches for quicker alteration via point-and-click (or drag and drop). This saves time and effort over human intervention to manually change each file separately. Automator enables the repetition of tasks across a wide variety of programs, including Finder, Safari, Calendar, Contacts and others. It can also work with third-party applications such as Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop or Pixelmator. The icon features a robot holding a pipe, a reference to pipelines, a computer science term for connected data workflows. Automator was first released with Mac OS X Tiger (10.4).[7]

Automator provides a graphical user interface for automating tasks without knowledge of programming or scripting languages. Tasks can be recorded as they are performed by the user or can be selected from a list. The output of the previous action can become the input to the next action.

Automator comes with a library of Actions (file renaming, finding linked images, creating a new mail message, etc.) that act as individual steps in a Workflow document. A Workflow document is used to carry out repetitive tasks. Workflows can be saved and reused. Unix command line scripts and AppleScripts can also be invoked as Actions. The actions are linked together in a Workflow. The Workflow can be saved as an application, Workflow file or a contextual menu item. Options can be set when the Workflow is created or when the Workflow is run. A workflow file created in Automator is saved in /Users/{User Name}/Library/Services.

Starting in macOS Monterey, Automator is being replaced by Shortcuts.

The icon for Automator features a robot, known as Otto the Automator.[citation needed]

Books[edit]

Main article: Apple Books

Calculator[edit]

Main article: Calculator (macOS)

Calculator is a basic calculatorapplication made by Apple Inc. and bundled with macOS. It has three modes: basic, scientific, and programmer. Basic includes a number pad, buttons for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing, as well as memory keys. Scientific mode supports exponents and trigonometric functions, and programmer mode gives the user access to more options related to computer programming.

The Calculator program has a long history going back to the very beginning of the Macintosh platform, where a simple four-function calculator program was a standard desk accessory from the earliest system versions. Though no higher math capability was included, third-party developers provided upgrades, and Apple released the Graphing Calculator application with the first PowerPC release (7.1.2) of the Mac OS, and it was a standard component through Mac OS 9. Apple currently ships a different application called Grapher.

Calculator has Reverse Polish notation support, and can also speak the buttons pressed and result returned.

The Calculator appeared first as a desk accessory in first version of Macintosh System for the 1984 Macintosh 128k. Its original incarnation was developed by Chris Espinosa and its appearance was designed, in part, by Steve Jobs when Espinosa, flustered by Jobs's dissatisfaction with all of his prototype designs, conceived an application called The Steve Jobs Roll Your Own Calculator Construction Set that allowed Jobs to tailor the look of the calculator to his liking. Its design was maintained with the same basic math operations until the final release of classic Mac OS in 2002.[8]

A Dashboard Calculator widget is included in all versions of macOS from Mac OS X Tiger onwards. It only has the basic mode of its desktop counterpart. Since the release of OS X Yosemite, there is also a simple calculator widget available in the notifications area.[9]

Since the release of Mac OS X Leopard, simple arithmetic functions can be calculated from Spotlight feature.[10] They include the standard addition, subtraction, division, multiplication, exponentiation and the use of the percent sign to denote percentage.

Calendar[edit]

Main article: Calendar (Apple)

Calendar is a personal calendar app made by Apple Inc. that runs on both the macOSdesktopoperating system and the iOSmobile operating system. It offers online cloud backup of calendars using Apple's iCloud service, or can synchronize with other calendar services, including Google Calendar and Microsoft Exchange Server.

Chess[edit]

Screenshot of Apple Chess

Apple Chess is a 3Dchess game for macOS, developed by Apple Inc. as a fork of GNOME Chess (formerly "glChess").[11] Its history dates back to OpenStep and Mac OS X 10.2. It supports chess variants such as crazyhouse and suicide chess. Apple redistributes the source code under its own Apple Sample Code License, after a special permission has been granted from the original authors of GNOME Chess (which is licensed under GPL3).[12][11] Apple ships with the game also the Sjeng chess engine (GPL).

Contacts[edit]

Main article: Contacts (Apple)

Contacts, called Address Book before OS X Mountain Lion, is a computerized address book included with Apple Inc.'s macOS. It includes various synchronizing capabilities and integrates with other macOS applications and features.

Dictionary[edit]

Main article: Dictionary (software)

Dictionary is an application that includes an in-built dictionary and thesaurus.[13]

FaceTime[edit]

Main article: FaceTime

Find My[edit]

Main article: Find My

First added to macOS 10.15, it tracks location of compatible devices connected via iCloud.[14]

Font Book[edit]

Main article: Font Book

Home[edit]

Main article: HomeKit

Home is the front-end for Apple's HomeKit software framework.

Image Capture[edit]

Main article: Image Capture

Launchpad[edit]

Main article: Launchpad (macOS)

Launchpad is an application launcher for macOS that was first introduced in Mac OS X Lion. Launchpad provides an alternative way to start applications in macOS, in addition to other options such as the Dock (toolbar launcher), Finder (file manager), Spotlight (desktop search) or Terminal (command-line interface).[15]

Mail[edit]

Main article: Mail (Apple)

Maps[edit]

Main article: Apple Maps

Messages[edit]

Main article: Messages (Apple)

Mission Control[edit]

Main article: Mission Control (macOS)

Music[edit]

Main article: Music (software)

News[edit]

Main article: Apple News

Notes[edit]

Main article: Notes (Apple)

Notes is macOS's notetaking app. It had first been developed for iOS, but had first been introduced to macOS starting with OS X Mountain Lion. Its main function is provide a service for creating short text notes in the computer, as well as being able to be shared to other macOS or iOS devices via Apple's iCloud service.

Photo Booth[edit]

Main article: Photo Booth

Photo Booth is a camera application for macOS. It utilizes the front iSight camera to take pictures and videos.[16][17]

Photos[edit]

Main article: Apple Photos

Photos is a photo management and editing application that was designed based on the in-built app released for iOS 8. On macOS, Photos was first introduced to OS X Yosemite users in the 10.10.3 update on April 8, 2015,[18][19][20] replacing iPhoto.[21][22]

Podcasts[edit]

Main article: Podcasts (software)

Preview[edit]

Main article: Preview (macOS)

QuickTime Player[edit]

Main article: QuickTime

The QuickTime player is an application that can play video and sound files.[23]

Reminders[edit]

Main article: Reminders (Apple)

Task-managing app introduced to OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion and iOS 5.

Siri[edit]

Main article: Siri

Introduced in macOS 10.12, Siri is a digital assistant that allows the user to interact with it to ask questions, make recommendations, and perform actions on the device. It had been previously included in iOS.

Stickies[edit]

Main article: Stickies (Apple)

Stocks[edit]

Stocks is an application that provides information regarding stocks of various companies around the world.

System Preferences[edit]

Main article: System Preferences

TV[edit]

Main article: Apple TV (software)

TextEdit[edit]

Main article: TextEdit

Time Machine[edit]

Main article: Time Machine (macOS)

Time Machine is an application where the user can back up their files.[24][25]

Voice Memos[edit]

Voice Memos, introduced in macOS Mojave,[26] is a basic application with the capability of recording audio. In addition to this, it allows several editing functions, such as trimming and overwriting.[27]

/System/Applications/Utilities[edit]

Activity Monitor[edit]

"Activity monitor" redirects here. For the fitness device, see Activity tracker. For the generic system component, see System monitor.

Activity Monitor is a system monitor for the macOSoperating system, which also incorporates task manager functionality.[28][29] Activity Monitor appeared in Mac OS X v10.3, when it subsumed the functionality of the programs Process Viewer (a task manager) and CPU Monitor found in the previous version of OS X.[30][31] In OS X 10.9, Activity Monitor was significantly revamped and gained a 5th tab for "energy" (in addition to CPU, memory, disk, and network).[32]

AirPort Utility[edit]

AirPort Utility is a program that allows users to configure an AirPortwireless network and manage services associated with and devices connected to AirPort Routers. It comes pre-installed on macOS, and is available to download for Microsoft Windows and iOS. AirPort Utility is unique in that it offers network configuration in a native application as opposed to a web application. It provides a graphical overview of AirPort devices attached to a network, and provides tools to manage each one individually. It allows users to configure their network preferences, assign Back to My Mac accounts to the network, and configure USB attached Printers and hard drives.[33] The current versions are 6.3.6 for recent versions of macOS, 5.6.1 for Microsoft Windows and older versions[34] of Mac OS X,[35] and 1.3.4 for iOS.[36]

On January 30, 2013, Apple released AirPort Utility 6.0 for macOS featuring a redesign of the user interface focused on increasing usability for novice users.[37] Reception was mixed with some media outlets reporting IT professionals and network administrators being frustrated over some removed features.[37] It was reported that most end users, however, wouldn't notice the feature omissions.[38] Users requiring the removed features can still access the previous version of AirPort Utility using a workaround.[39]

Audio MIDI Setup[edit]

The Audio MIDI Setup utility is a program that comes with the macOS operating system for adjusting the computer's audio input and output configuration settings and managing MIDI devices.

It was first introduced in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard as a simplified way to configure MIDI Devices. Users need to be aware that prior to this release, MIDI devices did not require this step, and it mention of it might be omitted from MIDI devices from third-party manufactures.

Bluetooth File Exchange[edit]

Bluetooth File Exchange is a utility that comes with the macOSoperating system, used to exchange files to or from a Bluetooth-enabled device. For example, it could be used to send an image to a cellphone, or to receive an image or other documents from a PDA.

Boot Camp Assistant[edit]

Main article: Boot Camp (software)

Assists users with installing Windows on their Mac using Boot Camp.[40] Boot Camp does not support Macs with Apple silicon processors. This is because Windows 10 does not currently have a commercial version of Windows 10 that runs on ARM based processors.

ColorSync Utility[edit]

ColorSync Utility is software that ships with macOS. It is used for management of color profiles and filters used in Apple's PDFworkflow, or applying filters to PDF documents.

The interface is composed of two parts: the document browser and the utility window. The document browser lets the user zoom in and out of an image or apply a Filter to it. The utility window has several options: Profile First Aid, Profiles, Devices, Filters and Calculator.

Profile First Aid allows the user to repair ColorSync color profiles so they conform to the International Color Consortium specification.

Profiles allows the user to browse the profiles installed on the system, grouped by location, class or space, and graphically compare any two profiles.

The profile map is displayed as a rotatable, scalable 3D object and can be plotted in CIELAB, CIELUV, YXY, YUV and CIEXYZ.

The Devices section allows the user to see a list of all registered ColorSync devices such as displays and printers, and see what ColorSync profile is applied to each one. It is also possible to override the default setting.

The Filters section allows the user to build and modify PDF filters that are available to the rest of the operating system. Each filter can be set to appear in one of three domains: Application, PDF Workflows, and Printing.

Filters set to Printing will appear in the drop-down menu under the "Save as PDF..." button in the standard Mac OS X print dialog box. Filters set to PDF Workflow will appear in the Quartz Filters drop-down menu in the ColorSync section of a print dialog box. The default filters that ship with Mac OS X are:

  • Black & White
  • Blue Tone
  • Create Generic PDFX-3 Document
  • Gray Tone
  • Lightness Decrease
  • Lightness Increase
  • Reduce File Size
  • Sepia Tone

User-created filters can have color management, image effects, PDF retouch, domain selection and comments.

The Color Management section allows assigning a profile, choosing a default profile, rendering intent, converting to a profile or intermediate transform.

The Intermediate Transform section allows adjustment of brightness, tint, hue, saturation, bilevel (high pass filter) or profile assignment, to either grayscale, RGB or CMYK, or all data in the file. This can be applied to either text, graphics, images or shading.

Complex filters can be created by stacking multiple effects. Any changes made to the PDF file can then be saved as a new PDF file.

Calculator can convert between RGB, CMYK and other color value schemes, and features an interactive color-picker for identifying a color on the screen, duplicating a feature of another bundled utility, DigitalColor Meter.

ColorSync is Apple Inc.'s color managementAPI for the Classic Mac OS and macOS. Apple developed the original 1.0 version of ColorSync as a Mac-only architecture, which made it into an operating system release in 1993. In the same year, Apple co-founded the International Color Consortium (ICC) to develop a cross-platform profile format which became part of ColorSync 2.0. The system Color Management Module (CMM) was "LinoColorCMM", which was developed by Linotype-Hell AG (now part of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG). The same CMM was used in Microsoft Windows 2000 and XP under the rubric of "Image Color Management" (ICM).[citation needed] Apple, with the help of Adobe had ported ColorSync 2.0 and its SDK to Microsoft Windows. With ColorSync 3.0, the Windows version which was initially planned was discontinued. ColorSync 4.0 is the latest version, introduced in Mac OS X 10.1.

Human color perception is a very complex and subtle process, and different devices have widely different color gamuts or ranges of color they can display. To deal with these issues, ColorSync provides several different methods of doing color matching. For instance, perceptual matching tries to preserve as closely as possible the relative relationships between colors, even if all the colors must be systematically distorted in order to get them to fit within the gamut of the destination device. Because the human eye is more sensitive to color differences rather than absolute colors, this method tends to produce the best-looking results, subjectively speaking, for many common uses, but there are other methods that work better in some cases. (This set of rendering intents is part of the ICC system, and is available on all systems with ICC.)

As dictated by the ICC system, the profile connection space in ColorSync is the CIE XYZ color space. All image input and output devices (scanners, printers, displays) have to be characterized by providing an ICC profile that defines how their color information is to be interpreted relative to this reference color space. This profile might be provided by the device manufacturer, but for better quality results, it might be generated by performing actual measurements on the device with a colorimeter. Thus, when an image is scanned on a scanner, the image file will include a copy of the scanner's profile to characterize the meaning of its color information. Then, before the image is sent to an output device, a matching process converts the color information at the time of rendering from the source profile (that attached to the image) to the destination profile (that attached to the output device) so that the resulting colors print or display as closely as possible to the original image.

Console[edit]

Console is a log viewer developed by Apple Inc. and included with macOS. It allows users to search through all of the system's logged messages, and can alert the user when certain types of messages are logged.[41] The Console is generally used for troubleshooting when there is a problem with the computer.[42] macOS itself, as well as any applications that are used, send a constant stream of messages to the system in the form of log files. The console allows you to read the system logs, help find certain ones, monitor them, and filter their contents.[43]

Clicking on "Show Log List" in the toolbar will bring up the Log List. The Log List opens a sidebar which shows all of the different logs that the system maintains. This list helps in viewing the many different logs maintained in various parts of the system by bringing them all together to one place. By clicking on a particular log category, all of the logs will be shown.[44]

The System Log Queries contains all of the logs that have to do with the entire system. This includes system logs as well as individual application logs.[44]

Selecting All Messages gives a live look at your computer's activities, updated live. This includes all activities from both the system as well as any applications running. Logs in this section of the Console are all formatted uniformly. They all include a timestamp, the name of the process or application, and the actual message of the log. When the message displayed includes a paperclip icon next to it, it means that it is a shortened version of a longer report, and clicking the icon will show the complete report.[45]

In addition to viewing all messages, users can also create custom queries with any criteria that they like. These custom queries will filter the messages and will also be shown in the All Messages section. In order to make a new query, choose "New System Log Query" from the File menu.[46]

Digital Color Meter[edit]

Main article: Digital Color Meter

Disk Utility[edit]

Main article: Disk Utility

Grapher[edit]

Main article: Grapher

Keychain Access[edit]

Main article: Keychain (software)

Migration Assistant[edit]

Main article: Migration Assistant (Apple)

Migration Assistant is an application for migrating information from another computer to the computer in use. It may be from a Windows computer or a Mac.

Screenshot[edit]

Available in macOS Mojave (10.14) and above,[47] the Screenshot app bundles features such as screen recording and taking screenshots. Screenshot is initialized whenever the user presses the keyboard shortcuts ++, ++, ++, or ++.[48]

Script Editor[edit]

Main article: AppleScript Editor

System Information[edit]

Main article: System Information (Mac)

System Information is an application that shows the system information about a Macintosh product.

Terminal[edit]

Main article: Terminal (macOS)

VoiceOver Utility[edit]

Main article: VoiceOver

VoiceOver is an application where the user can listen to spoken descriptions on the computer.[49][50]

/System/Library/CoreServices[edit]

AddPrinter[edit]

AddressBookUrlForwarder[edit]

AirPlayUIAgent[edit]

AirPort Base Station Agent[edit]

AppleScript Utility[edit]

Automator Application Stub[edit]

Automator Installer[edit]

AVB Audio Configuration[edit]

Bluetooth Setup Assistant[edit]

BluetoothUIServer[edit]

CalendarFileHandler[edit]

Captive Network Assistant[edit]

Certificate Assistant[edit]

The Certificate Assistant is a utility for creating and verifying digital certificates.

ClimateProxy[edit]

Clock[edit]

ControlCenter[edit]

Control Center provides access to system controls, such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Sound, in a unified interface accessible from the menu bar. Some of these controls can be added to the menu bar by dragging them from Control Center. Additional components can be added in System Preferences.[51] Available controls include:

  • Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth
  • AirDrop
  • Do Not Disturb
  • Keyboard Brightness (available on Mac notebooks)
  • Screen Mirroring
  • Display
  • Sound
  • Now Playing
  • Accessibility Shortcuts
  • Battery (available on Mac notebooks)
  • Fast User Switching

ControlStrip[edit]

Control Strip provides controls in the Touch Bar for common settings like brightness and volume.[52]

CoreLocationAgent[edit]

CoreLocationAgent is responsible for displaying authorization prompts to allow apps and widgets to access location services.[53]

CoreServicesUIAgent[edit]

Database Events[edit]

DiscHelper[edit]

DiskImageMounter[edit]

Main article: DiskImageMounter

DiskImageMounter is a CoreServices application used to mount disk images.

Dock[edit]

Main article: Dock (macOS)

The Dock is the main method of launching applications on macOS.

Dwell Control[edit]

Dwell allows the pointer to be controlled using head or eye tracking technologies. A user can also trigger actions by dwelling or holding the pointer still for a specified amount of time which will trigger the programmed dwell actions.

EscrowSecurityAlert[edit]

Family (OSX)[edit]

Finder[edit]

Main article: Finder (software)

Finder is the default file manager and graphical interfaceshell of macOS.

FolderActionsDispatcher[edit]

FolderActionsDispatcher is responsible for monitoring changes to the filesystem to run Folder Action scripts.

Games[edit]

HelpViewer[edit]

Main article: Apple Help Viewer

iCloud[edit]

Image Events[edit]

Install Command Line Developer Tools[edit]

This utility allows developers to easily install command line tools for building, creating, and editing Xcode projects through the terminal, but does not require Xcode to be installed. It is possible to execute this program by running in the terminal.[54]

Install in Progress[edit]

Install in Progress is another application included in macOS (and in its progenitors OPENSTEP and NeXTSTEP) that extracts and installs files out of .pkg packages. It was created by NeXT, and is now maintained by Apple Inc.[citation needed]

Installer Progress[edit]

Installer[edit]

Main article: Installer (macOS)

JavaLauncher[edit]

KeyboardAccessAgent[edit]

KeyboardSetupAssistant[edit]

Keychain Circle Notification[edit]

Keychain Circle Notification is involved in iCloud Keychain syncing.

Language Chooser[edit]

[edit]

loginwindow[edit]

The loginwindow process displays the macOS login window at system startup if auto-login is not set, verifies login attempts, and launches login applications. It also implements the Force Quit window, restarts macOS user interface components (the Dock and Finder) if they crash, and handles the logout, restart, and shutdown routines. [55][56]

Users are assigned their own loginwindow when they log in; if a loginwindow process belonging to a specific user is force quit, they will be logged out.[57]

ManagedClient[edit]

macOS Setup Assistant[edit]

Setup Assistant is the app that allows users that have installed a fresh copy of macOS or have just bought a new Mac to set it up and configure important settings like Computer Accounts, Apple ID, iCloud, and Accessibility settings. It is also run after major macOS system upgrades.

Memory Slot Utility[edit]

NetAuthAgent[edit]

NetAuthAgent is an interface for authenticating with network file servers and selecting shares.

NotificationCenter[edit]

NotificationCenter is an application that displays notifications from apps and websites. Users access Notification Center by clicking the clock in the menu bar on macOS Big Sur or the Notification Center icon in earlier versions of macOS. Notification Center can be customized in System Preferences.

NowPlayingTouchUI[edit]

NowPlayingWidgetContainer[edit]

OBEXAgent[edit]

OBEXAgent is a server that handles Bluetooth access.

ODSAgent[edit]

ODSAgent is a server that handles remote disk access.[58]

OSDUIHelper[edit]

OSDUIHelper displays on-screen graphics when certain settings, such as volume or display brightness, or adjusted.

PIPAgent[edit]

PIPAgent manages the picture-in-picture feature available in macOS Sierra and later.

Paired Devices[edit]

Pass Viewer[edit]

Photo Library Migration Utility[edit]

Photo Library Migration Utility migrates iPhoto and Aperture libraries to Photos.

PodcastsAuthAgent[edit]

PowerChime[edit]

PowerChime, present on some MacBook models, is a macOS service that plays a chime when plugged in to power.[59]

Problem Reporter[edit]

ProfileHelper[edit]

RapportUIAgent[edit]

rcd[edit]

RegisterPluginIMApp[edit]

ReportPanic[edit]

ReportPanic is an app that displays a window when the system reboots from a kernel panic; it allows the user to send a report to Apple.[60]

Rosetta 2 Updater[edit]

Screen Time[edit]

screencaptureui[edit]

screencaptureui draws the user interface shown when taking a screenshot.

ScreenSaverEngine[edit]

ScreenSaverEngine is an application that handles screen saver access

[edit]

ScriptMonitor[edit]

Siri[edit]

Main article: Siri

Siri is the virtual assistant that is part of Apple's iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, macOS, and tvOS operating systems. Siri uses voice queries and a natural-language user interface to answer questions, make recommendations, and perform actions by delegating requests to a set of Internet services.

Siri was launched to macOS in 2016 with the release of macOS Sierra (10.12).

Software Update[edit]

Software Update is a section in System Preferences for Mac Software Updates, as well as updates to core Mac apps, starting in macOS Mojave (10.14); it also has an item in the Apple menu. From OS X Mountain Lion (10.8)[61] to macOS High Sierra (10.13), the Mac App Store was used for Software Updates; prior to that, Software Update was a separate utility, which could be launched from the Apple menu or from the Software Update pane in System Preferences.

SpacesTouchBarAgent[edit]

Spotlight[edit]

Main article: Spotlight (software)

Spotlight in OS X Yosemite

Spotlight is macOS's selection-based search system, used for indexing documents, pictures, music, applications, and System Preferences within the computer.

System Events[edit]

SystemUIServer[edit]

SystemUIServer manages status items in the menu bar.

[edit]

TextInputSwitcher[edit]

ThermalTrap[edit]

ThermalTrap notifies users when the system temperature exceeds a usable limit.

UIKitSystem[edit]

UniversalAccessControl[edit]

UnmountAssistantAgent[edit]

UnmountAssistantAgent displays a dialog if there is a process preventing ejection of a disk and offers to forcibly eject the disk if the process cannot be quit.

UserNotificationCenter[edit]

VoiceOver[edit]

WatchFaceAlert[edit]

WidgetKit Simulator[edit]

/System/Library/CoreServices/Applications[edit]

About This Mac[edit]

About This Mac shows information about the Mac it is running on, such as the hardware, serial number, and macOS version.[62]

Archive Utility[edit]

Archive Utility (BOMArchiveHelper until Mac OS X 10.5) is the default archive file handler in macOS. It is usually invoked automatically when opening a file in one of its supported formats.[63] It can be used to create compressed ZIP archives by choosing "Create archive of 'file'" (Leopard: "Compress") in the Finder's File or contextual menu. It is located at in Mac OS X 10.10, in 10.5 and later, and in 10.4[64] Prior to Archive Utility's inclusion in Mac OS X v10.3, beginning with Mac OS 7.6, Apple bundled the freeware StuffIt Expander with the operating system.

Invoking Archive Utility manually shows a minimal GUI letting the user change Archive Utility preferences or choose files to compress or uncompress.

BOM is an abbreviation of Bill of Materials. Bill of Materials files or .bom files are used by the macOS Installer program to document where files in an installer bundle are installed, what their file permissions should be, and other file metadata. Thus, a Bill of Materials is read by the Installer, and Archive Utility helps it by extracting the files specified in the BOM.

DVD Player[edit]

Main article: DVD Player (Mac OS)

DVD Player (formerly Apple DVD Player) is the default DVD player in macOS. It supports all the standard DVD features such as multiple audio, video & subtitle tracks as well as Dolby Digital 5.1 passthrough, DVD access URLs and closed captions. In some instances, users can choose which VOB file to open. DVD Player is also fully compatible with DVDs authored by DVD Studio Pro and iDVD, including HD DVDs by DVD Studio Pro.

Directory Utility[edit]

Main article: Directory Utility

Expansion Slot Utility[edit]

Expansion Slot Utility allows manual allocation of PCIe card bandwidth. It is only available on certain Mac Pro models.

Feedback Assistant[edit]

Folder Actions Setup[edit]

iOS App Installer[edit]

iOS App Installer is a app that downloads .ipa files for iPadOS applications so that they can be run on Apple silicon-based Macs.

Network Utility[edit]

Main article: Network Utility

Screen Sharing[edit]

Screen Sharing is a basic Mac utility that may be used to control remote computers and access their files. To connect, one may enter a VNC or Apple ID and authenticate as a local user on the remote computer, or, if the computers are linked via the same Apple ID, automatically initialise the connection. It supports features such as a shared clipboard between the two computers and remotely transferring files. The feature must be enabled in the Sharing preference pane in System Preferences.[65]

Storage Management[edit]

Ticket Viewer[edit]

Ticket Viewer is an app that displays Kerberos tickets.

Wireless Diagnostics[edit]

Other applications and accessories[edit]

Crash Reporter[edit]

Crash Reporter is the standard crash reporter in macOS.[66] Crash Reporter can send the crash logs to Apple Inc. for their engineers to review.

Crash Reporter has three modes of operations:

  • Basic — The default mode. Only application crashes are reported, and the dialog does not contain any debugging information.
  • Developer — In addition to application crashes, crashes are also displayed for background and system processes.
  • Server — The default for macOS Server systems. No crash reports are shown to the user (though they are still logged).
  • None — Disables the dialog prompt. Crash reports are neither displayed nor logged.

The developer tool CrashReporterPrefs can be used to change modes, as can using the terminal command .

In basic mode, if Crash Reporter notices an application has crashed twice in succession, it will offer to rename the application's preference file and try again (corrupted preference files being a common cause of crashes).

When reporting a crash, the top text field of the window has the crash log, while the bottom field is for user comments. Users may also copy and paste the log into their e-mail client to send to a third-party application developer for the developer to use.

Directory Access[edit]

Internet Connect[edit]

Main article: Internet Connect

NetInfo Manager[edit]

ODBC Administrator[edit]

Printer Setup Utility[edit]

Older applications[edit]

Classic[edit]

JPEGViewrunning in the Classic Environment

"MacOS Classic" redirects here. For the pre-Mac OS X operating system for Macs, see Classic Mac OS.

The Classic Environment, usually referred to as Classic, is a hardware and softwareabstraction layer in PowerPC versions of Mac OS X that allows most legacyapplications compatible with Mac OS 9 to run on Mac OS X. The name "Classic" is also sometimes used by software vendors to refer to the application programming interface available to "classic" applications, to differentiate between programming for Mac OS X and the classic version of the Mac OS.

The Classic Environment is supported on PowerPC-based Macintosh computers running versions of Mac OS X up to 10.4 "Tiger", but not with 10.5 "Leopard" or Macintoshes utilizing any other architecture than PowerPC.

The Classic Environment is a descendant of Rhapsody's "Blue Box" virtualization layer, which served as a proof of concept. (Previously, Apple A/UX also offered a virtualized Mac OS environment on top of a UNIX operating system.) It uses a Mac OS 9 System Folder, and a New World ROM file to bridge the differences between the older PowerPC Macintosh platforms and the XNUkernel environment. The Classic Environment was created as a key element of Apple's strategy to replace the classic Mac OS (versions 9 and below) with Mac OS X as the standard operating system (OS) used by Macintosh computers by eliminating the need to use the older OS directly.

The Classic Environment can be loaded at login (for faster activation when needed later), on command, or whenever a Mac OS application that requires it is launched (to reduce the use of system resources when not needed). It requires a full version of Mac OS 9 to be installed on the system, and loads an instance of that OS in a sandbox environment, replacing some low-level system calls with equivalent calls to Mac OS X via updated system files and the Classic Support system enabler. This sandbox is used to launch all "classic" Mac OS applications—there is only one instance of the Classic process running for a given user, and only one user per machine may be running Classic at a time.

If the user chooses to launch the Classic Environment only when needed, launching a "classic" application first launches the Classic Environment, which can be configured to appear in a window resembling the display of a computer booting into Mac OS 9. When the Classic Environment has finished loading, the application launches. When a "classic" application is in the foreground, the menu bar at the top of the screen changes to look like the older Mac OS system menu. Dialog boxes and other user-interface elements retain their traditional appearance.

The Classic Environment provides a way to run "Classic" applications on Apple's G5 systems as well as on most G4 based computers sold after January 2003. These machines cannot boot Mac OS 9 or earlier without the bridging capabilities of the Classic Environment or other software (see SheepShaver).

The Classic Environment's compatibility is usually sufficient for many applications, provided the application using it does not require direct access to hardware or engage in full-screen drawing. However, it is not a complete clone of Mac OS 9. The Finder included with Mac OS X v10.2 and later does not support the "Reveal Object" Apple events used by some Mac OS 9 applications, causing the "Reveal In Finder" functionality for those applications to be lost. Early releases of Mac OS X would often fail to draw window frames of Classic applications correctly, and after the Classic Environment's windowing was made double buffered in Mac OS X Panther, some older applications and games sometimes failed to update the screen properly, such as the original Macintosh port of Doom. However, the Classic Environment "resurrected" some older applications that had previously been unusable on the Macintosh Quadra and Power Macintosh series; this is because Mac OS X replaced Mac OS 9's virtual memory system with a more standard and less fragile implementation.

The Classic Environment's performance is also generally acceptable, with a few exceptions. Most of an application is run directly as PowerPC code (which would not be possible on Intel-based Macs). Motorola68k code is handled by the same Motorola 68LC040 emulator that Mac OS 9 uses. Some application functions are actually faster in the Classic Environment than under Mac OS 9 on equivalent hardware, due to performance improvements in the newer operating system's device drivers. These applications are largely those that use heavy disk processing, and were often quickly ported to Mac OS X by their developers. On the other hand, applications that rely on heavy processing and which did not share resources under Mac OS 9's co-operative multitasking model will be interrupted by other (non-Classic) processes under Mac OS X's preemptive multitasking. The greater processing power of most systems that run Mac OS X (compared to systems intended to run Mac OS 8 or 9) helps to mitigate the performance degradation of the Classic Environment's virtualization.

Dashboard[edit]

Main article: Dashboard (macOS)

Dashboard was an application for Apple Inc.'s macOS operating systems, used as a secondary desktop for hosting mini-applications known as widgets. These are intended to be simple applications that do not take time to launch. Dashboard applications supplied with macOS include a stock ticker, weather report, calculator and notepad; users can create or download their own. Before Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, when Dashboard is activated, the user's desktop is dimmed and widgets appear in the foreground. Like application windows, they can be moved around, rearranged, deleted, and recreated (so that more than one of the same Widget is open at the same time, possibly with different settings). New widgets can be opened, via an icon bar on the bottom of the layer, loading a list of available apps similar to the iOS homescreen or the macOS Launchpad. After loading, the widget is ready for use.

Dashboard was first introduced in Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger.[67][68][69] It can be activated as an application, from the Dock, Launchpad or Spotlight. It can also be accessed by a dashboard key.[70] Alternatively, the user can choose to make Dashboard open on moving the cursor into a preassigned hot corner or keyboard shortcut. Starting with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, the Dashboard can be configured as a space, accessed by swiping four fingers to the right from the Desktops either side of it. In OS X 10.10 Yosemite, the Dashboard is disabled by default, as the Notification Center is now the primary method of displaying widgets.

As of macOS 10.15 Catalina, Dashboard has been removed from macOS.[71]

Grab[edit]

Main article: Grab (software)

Grab is a utility program in macOS for taking screenshots. It supports capturing a marquee selection, a whole window, and the whole screen, as well as timed screenshots. The program originated in OPENSTEP and NeXTSTEP, and continued to be preinstalled by Apple on macOS until version 10.13 (High Sierra). It was replaced by the utility Screenshot in macOS 10.14 (Mojave). On macOS versions 10.13 and earlier, Grab is found in the folder Utilities, which is a subdirectory of Applications. It may be quickly opened by using the Spotlight function when entering grab, or by pressing ⌘ Cmd+⇧ Shift+G and typing /Applications/Utilities/Grab.app in application Finder. It was previously also found in the Finder menu under Services > Grab. As of Mac OS X v10.4 Preview had a submenu item (Take Screenshot) in the File menu, with selection, window, and timed screen.[citation needed] in more recent versions of macOS.

Grab saves screenshots in the Tagged Image File Format (TIFF). In macOS, it is also possible to save screenshots directly to the Desktop in PDF format (earlier versions of macOS) or PNG format (later versions), using keystrokes shown below. For DRM reasons, it is not possible to use this software while DVD Player is open.

Grab helps determine the size of an element on the screen. After using the selection feature and capturing the screen, one can select Inspector from the menu or press ⌘ Cmd+1 (or ⌘ Cmd+I); a dialog box will appear with the dimensions of the selected area.

iDVD[edit]

Main article: iDVD

iDVD is a discontinued DVD-creation application.

iSync[edit]

Main article: iSync

iSync is a software application first released by Apple Inc. on Jan 2, 2003. Apple licensed the core technology from fusionOne. It ran only under Mac OS X and was used to synchronize contact and calendar data from Address Book and iCal with many non-Apple SyncML-enabled mobile phones via a Bluetooth or USB connection. Support for many (pre-October 2007) devices was built-in, with newer devices being supported via manufacturer and third-party iSync Plugins. Support for Palm OS organizers and compatible smartphones was removed with the release of iSync 3.1 and Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. BlackBerry OS, Palm OS, and Windows Mobile (Pocket PC) devices could not be used with iSync, but were supported by third-party applications. Before the release of Mac OS X 10.4, iSync also synchronized a user's Safari bookmarks with the then .Mac subscription service provided by Apple. iSync was removed from Mac OS X in version 10.7 (Lion). However, since the underlying framework still existed in Lion and 10.8 (Mountain Lion), it was possible to restore the functionality of iSync using a 10.6 (Snow Leopard) installation or backup

iTunes[edit]

Main article: iTunes

iTunes is a media player, media library, Internet radio broadcaster, mobile device management utility, and the client app for iTunes Store. It is used to purchase, play, download, and organize digital multimedia, on personal computers running the macOS and Windows operating systems. iTunes is developed by Apple Inc. It was announced on January 9, 2001.

Because iTunes was criticized for having a bloated user experience, Apple decided to split iTunes into separate apps as of macOS Catalina: Music, Podcasts, and TV. Finder would take over the device management capabilities.[72][73] This change would not affect Windows or older macOS versions.[74]

Sherlock[edit]

Main article: Sherlock (software)

Sherlock, named after fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, was a file and web search tool created by Apple Inc. for the PowerPC-based "classic" Mac OS, introduced with Mac OS 8 as an extension of the Mac OS Finder's file searching capabilities. Like its predecessor (System 7.5’s totally revamped 'Find File' app, adapted by Bill Monk from his 'Find Pro' shareware find program[1]), Sherlock searched for local files and file contents, using the same basic indexing code and search logic found in AppleSearch. Sherlock extended the system by enabling the user to search for items through the World Wide Web through a set of plugins which employed existing web search engines. These plugins were written as plain text files, so that it was a simple task for a user to write a Sherlock plugin. Since most of the standard plug-ins for Sherlock provided by Apple itself no longer function, it was officially retired and removed in the release of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard in 2007.

Software Update[edit]

"Software Update" redirects here. For software updates in general, see Patch (computing).

In Mac OS 9 and earlier versions of Mac OS X, Software Update was a standalone tool. The program was part of the CoreServices in OS X. It could automatically inform users of new updates (with new features and bug and security fixes) to the operating system, applications, device drivers, and firmware. All updates required the user to enter their administrative password and some required a system restart. It could be set to check for updates daily, weekly, monthly, or not at all; in addition, it could download and store the associated .pkg file (the same type used by Installer) to be installed at a later date, and it maintained a history of installed updates. Starting with Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, updates that required a reboot logged out the user prior to installation and automatically restarted the computer when complete. In earlier versions of OS X, the updates were installed, but critical files were not replaced until the next system startup.

Beginning with OS X 10.8, Software Update became part of the App Store application. Beginning with macOS Mojave (10.14), it became part of System Preferences.

X11[edit]

Main article: XQuartz

In Mac OS X Tiger, X11 was an optional install included on the install DVD. Mac OS X Leopard, Snow Leopard and Lion installed X11 by default, but from OS X Mountain Lion (10.8), Apple dropped dedicated support for X11, with users directed to the open source XQuartz project (to which it contributes) instead.[75]

Development tools[edit]

Server technology[edit]

Core components[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"WebKit". WebKit. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  2. ^ abDarren Murph (December 6, 2010). "Apple Mac App Store: open for business starting January 6th". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved December 16, 2010.
  3. ^ abMuchmore, Michael (January 6, 2011). "Apple's Mac App Store: Hands On". PC Magazine. PC Magazine. Retrieved January 6, 2011.
  4. ^Mac App Store Review (November 3, 2010). "Apple Now Accepting Submissions For The Mac App Store". MacAppStoreReview.com. Archived from the original on November 9, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  5. ^"Mac App Store Downloads Top One Million in First Day" (Press release). Apple Inc. January 7, 2011. Retrieved January 10, 2011.
  6. ^Shimpi, Anand Lal. "Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger Review". Retrieved 2018-05-09.
  7. ^Isaacson, Walter (2011). Steve Jobs. Simon & Schuster. p. 132. ISBN .
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

What Is Other in Mac Storage and How Do You Clear It?

Are you facing a “Your startup disk is full” situation? But you have no more movies or photos that you feel you can send to the trash? Don’t despair! You can free up valuable disk space by cleaning the 'Other' storage on your Mac. Read this article to learn how to delete all the useless files occupying your precious storage.

 

Let’s take a look at the Mac 'Other' section and optimize your storage.
 

Tip
 

Managing your Mac’s disk space usage can be really challenging if you decide to keep track of everything manually.
 

An alternative way to look after it is with an automatic tool, dedicated to removing unneeded files quickly. That’s where MacKeeper can come in:    

  1. Download and install MacKeeper
  2. Go to the Safe Cleanup tool
  3. Hit Start Scan
  4. Click Clean Junk Files once the scan is complete

Did you know?

You can enjoy a one-time cleanup for free, so you can take MacKeeper for a test drive without activating the full version.

What is 'Other' on Mac storage?

In a nutshell, the 'Other' storage on a Mac consists of different types of files that don't fall into any particular storage category (like videos, photos, music, apps, or mail). The ‘Other’ category also includes junk files and personal files.

 

To clarify, it might contain the following file types: .pdf, .psd, .doc, browser caches, voice files, message media files stored locally, system caches, archive files like .zip and .dmg disk images, fonts, extensions, app plugins, and other files that don’t belong to the categories above.

 

These 'Other' files can occupy a lot of disk space—by cleaning out the 'Other' section on our Mac we were able to recover a whopping 26GB of storage!

How to check what's taking up 'Other' storage on Mac

To discover what's taking up space on your hard drive (including in the 'Other' category):

  1. Open the Apple menu
  2. Choose About This Mac
  3. Click Storage
storage on mac

Here you'll see an overview of all the available storage on your hard drive, along with the space taken up by various file types. You’ll see a bar divided into several different colored sections, each representing different storage categories. You may need to wait for the system to calculate these sections first.

 

You'll see how much space is being taken up by apps, photos, videos, system files, etc. Usually, a major part of the used space is taken up by the 'Other' section—often between 10 and 40 percent of your used disk space.

 

To get more detailed information on what’s taking up your storage, you can use the advanced macOS tools:

 

1. In the Storage tab click the Manage button

storage window manage button highlighted

2. Use the left-hand panel to access any category. First, you'll see the Recommendations window

recommendations window

Have a click around to see how you can optimize your storage. It’s an excellent idea to manage your Trash preferences from here. Turning on the Empty Bin Automatically option is a great example of how to free up storage regularly.

How to delete 'Other' storage on Mac

Before we take a closer look at the basics of storage management you need to note one crucial thing: starting with macOS Sierra, macOS categorizes files differently to previous versions. So, if you're running the latest macOS Big Sur, it will take a lot less effort from you to clean files in 'Other'.

 

Important: You can’t delete all files from the 'Other' category.

 

To clean the 'Other' category, use this method:

  1. Click anywhere on your Desktop
  2. Press Command + F
  3. Select the This Mac tab
  4. Open the first dropdown menu
  5. Choose Other
  6. Look for and tick File Size and File Extension
  7. Click OK
searching this mac

8. Next, look for PDFs, Pages, DMG, or CSV files by typing their extensions in the search bar

searching this mac

9. Delete anything you don’t need

Clear temporary files located in 'Other' storage

What are temporary files? Well, macOS simply can't work without them. The macOS system creates temporary files at the launch of any app to perform various vital processes. However, after the operating system produces these files, they become outdated really quickly. These files aren't deleted automatically—instead, they are moved to the 'Other' category.

 

We recommend you clean temporary files from the 'Other' section regularly to optimize storage and avoid having to deal with a sluggish Mac. Use the following two methods to do this:

1. How to find and get rid of temporary files in 'Other' on Mac

  1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder from the menu bar
  2. Type in ~/Library
  3. Look for Application Support
application support folder

Application Support is a system folder that contains temporary files. The MobileSync folder, for instance, contains old device backups. Review the details of this folder and delete temporary files that you're sure you don't need anymore.

2. How to find and clear cache in 'Other' on Mac

Different types of cache files can waste disk space. Here's how to delete cache files from the 'Other' category manually:

  1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder from the menu bar
  2. Type ~/Library
  3. Find a Caches folder and copy its contents to the desktop for a backup
library caches folder

4. Move the original Caches folder to Trash

5. Empty your Trash bin

3. How to delete old Time Machine backups

To delete old backups via Time Machine, do the following:

  1. Connect your backup drive to your Mac
  2. Click on the Time Machine icon in the Menu Bar and choose Enter Time Machine
    Note: if you don't have the Time Machine pinned to the menu bar: go to System PreferencesTime Machine — tick the Show Time Machine in the menu bar box
Enter Time Machine

3. Look through your backups and choose the one to delete
4. Click on the Gear icon in the Finder window
5. Choose Delete Backup
6. Confirm the action and enter your admin password

How to delete downloaded files

The Downloads folder can easily get cluttered with large files. In particular, the numerous DMG files that are left after an app is installed can, over time, take up a huge amount of available storage space.

 

Let’s review two methods to remove unneeded downloads:

  1. Open Finder and go to Downloads
  2. Look through the files
  3. Control-click on the documents you don’t need
  4. Choose Move to Bin

 

Or use the macOS storage management tool:

  1. Click the Apple logo and go to About This Mac
  2. Go to Storage then click the Manage button
  3. Navigate to the Documents section and choose Downloads
  4. Mark the files you don’t need and hit the Delete button
manage storage with documents tab highlighted

How to get rid of disk images and archives in 'Other' on Mac

Disk image file types are stored in 'Other' as well. These files don't belong to the system files. They are downloaded exclusively by users. That's why you need to clear 'Othe’ disk images (DMG files) and archives (ZIP files) manually. To locate these ‘Other’ file types:

  1. In the Finder window type .zip or .dmg in the search bar
  2. Choose Search This Mac
  3. You can also sort the documents by size to quickly find and delete the largest ones

Delete files in 'Other' automatically

You can also scan and delete browser extensions by using the Smart Uninstaller tool. You can do it all from one tab, instead of searching through all your web browsers. As an added bonus, you can also review the details of each one of them on the list.

 

To automatically delete browser extensions using Smart Uninstaller:

  1. Navigate to Smart Uninstaller
  2. Hit Start Scan
  3. Wait for the scan results
  4. Go to Browser Extensions
  5. Tick the extensions you want to remove
  6. Click Remove Selected
smart uninstaller in mackeeper

Remove app plugins and app extensions from 'Other' storage on Mac

App plugins and extensions can be categorized as 'Other' as well. To delete unnecessary extensions, you need to delete them from your web browser. It would be best to do this in each browser you use, although that is rather time-consuming.

  1. Open your browser
  2. Find the extension, plugin, or tab panel, or open Tools
  3. Choose the add-ons that you don't use anymore and remove them

Delete iTunes device backups

Device backups are files that also fall under the 'Other' category. If you’ve recently changed to a new iOS device, you might try removing iTunes device backups of your old iPhone or iPad. You’ll be surprised how much storage space can be taken up by such files.

Get rid of everything else from 'Other' on Mac

In addition to all the previous steps, you can also remove screensavers from the 'Other' section. They don’t usually take up that much space, but every bit helps.

To delete screensavers:

  1. Open Finder and select Go > Go to Folder
  2. Type in ~/Library/Screen Savers
  3. Hit Go
  4. Select any screensavers you don’t want and move them to the Trash

 

Hopefully, you’ve now learned a whole lot more about how to get back extra storage on your Mac. Although you can clean all of these files manually, it’s often fiddly and time-consuming. Cleaning software can automate the process, and the best cleaners for Mac can do it in just a few clicks. Getting one can save you a significant amount of time and protect you from removing items that you still need on your hard drive, like system files.

 

Read more guides:

Written By

Ruslana Lishchuk

With over 5 years of supporting Mac users, Ruslana lives and breathes everything Mac. Tech expert, Apple lover, and well, a cutie. Say hi on LinkedIn!

With over 5 years of supporting Mac users, Ruslana lives and breathes everything Mac. Tech expert, Apple lover, and well, a cutie. Say hi on LinkedIn!

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

How to add macOS line-of-business (LOB) apps to Microsoft Intune

Use the information in this article to help you add macOS line-of-business apps to Microsoft Intune. You must download an external tool to pre-process your .pkg files before you can upload your line-of-business file to Microsoft Intune. The pre-processing of your .pkg files must take place on a macOS device.

Note

Starting with the release of macOS Catalina 10.15, prior to adding your apps to Intune, check to make sure your macOS LOB apps are notarized. If the developers of your LOB apps did not notarize their apps, the apps will fail to run on your users' macOS devices. For more information about how to check if an app is notarized, visit Notarize your macOS apps to prepare for macOS Catalina.

macOS LOB apps have a maximum size limit of 2 GB per app.

While users of macOS devices can remove some of the built-in macOS apps like Stocks, and Maps, you cannot use Intune to redeploy those apps. If end users delete these apps, they must go to the app store, and manually re install them.

Before your start

You must download an external tool, mark the downloaded tool as an executable, and pre-process your .pkg files with the tool before you can upload your line-of-business file to Microsoft Intune. The pre-processing of your .pkg files must take place on a macOS device. Use the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac to enable Mac apps to be managed by Microsoft Intune.

Important

The .pkg file must be signed using "Developer ID Installer" certificate, obtained from an Apple Developer account. Only .pkg files may be used to upload macOS LOB apps to Microsoft Intune. However, conversion of other formats, such as .dmg to .pkg is supported. For more information about converting non-pkg application types, see How to deploy DMG or APP-format apps to Intune-managed Macs.

  1. Download the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac.

    Note

    The Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac must be run on a macOS machine.

  2. Mark the downloaded tool as an executable:

    • Start the terminal app.
    • Change the directory to the location where is located.
    • Run the following command to make the tool executable:
  3. Use the command within the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac to wrap .pkg LOB app file from a .intunemac file.

    Sample commands to use for the Microsoft Intune App Wrapping Tool for macOS:

    Important

    Ensure that the argument does not contain spaces before running the commands.


    • This command will show usage information for the tool.


    • This command will wrap the .pkg LOB app file provided in to a .intunemac file of the same name and place it in the folder pointed to by .


    • This command will extract the detected parameters and version for the created .intunemac file.

Select the app type

  1. Sign in to the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center.
  2. Select Apps > All apps > Add.
  3. In the Select app type pane, under the Other app types, select Line-of-business app.
  4. Click Select. The Add app steps are displayed.

Step 1 - App information

Select the app package file

  1. In the Add app pane, click Select app package file.
  2. In the App package file pane, select the browse button. Then, select an macOS installation file with the extension .intunemac. The app details will be displayed.
  3. When you're finished, select OK on the App package file pane to add the app.

Set app information

  1. In the App information page, add the details for your app. Depending on the app that you chose, some of the values in this pane might be automatically filled in.
    • Name: Enter the name of the app as it appears in the company portal. Make sure all app names that you use are unique. If the same app name exists twice, only one of the apps appears in the company portal.
    • Description: Enter the description of the app. The description appears in the company portal.
    • Publisher: Enter the name of the publisher of the app.
    • Minimum Operating System: From the list, choose the minimum operating system version on which the app can be installed. If you assign the app to a device with an earlier operating system, it will not be installed.
    • Ignore app version: Select Yes to install the app if the app is not already installed on the device. Select No to only install the app when it is not already installed on the device, or if the deploying app's version number does not match the version that's already installed on the device.
    • Install as managed: Select Yes to install the Mac LOB app as a managed app on supported devices (macOS 11 and higher). A macOS LOB app can only be installed as managed when the app distributable contains a single app without any nested packages and installs to the /Applications directory. Managed line-of-business apps will be able to be removed using the uninstall assignment type on supported devices (macOS 11 and higher). In addition, removing the MDM profile removes all managed apps from the device. The default value is No.
    • Included apps: Review and edit the apps that are contained in the uploaded file. Included app bundle IDs and build numbers are used for detecting and monitoring app installation status of the uploaded file. Included apps list should only contain the application(s) installed by the uploaded file in Applications folder on Macs. Any other type of file that is not an application or an application that is not installed to Applications folder should be removed from the Included apps list. If Included apps list contains files that are not applications or if all the listed apps are not installed, app installation status does not report success.
      Mac Terminal can be used to lookup and confirm the included app details of an installed app.
      For example, to look up the bundle ID and build number of Company Portal, run the following:
      defaults read /Applications/Company\ Portal.app/Contents/Info CFBundleIdentifier
      Then, run the following:
      defaults read /Applications/Company\ Portal.app/Contents/Info CFBundleVersion
    • Category: Select one or more of the built-in app categories, or select a category that you created. Categories make it easier for users to find the app when they browse through the company portal.
    • Show this as a featured app in the Company Portal: Display the app prominently on the main page of the company portal when users browse for apps.
    • Information URL: Optionally, enter the URL of a website that contains information about this app. The URL appears in the company portal.
    • Privacy URL: Optionally, enter the URL of a website that contains privacy information for this app. The URL appears in the company portal.
    • Developer: Optionally, enter the name of the app developer.
    • Owner: Optionally, enter a name for the owner of this app. An example is HR department.
    • Notes: Enter any notes that you want to associate with this app.
    • Logo: Upload an icon that is associated with the app. This icon is displayed with the app when users browse through the company portal.
  2. Click Next to display the Scope tags page.

Step 2 - Select scope tags (optional)

You can use scope tags to determine who can see client app information in Intune. For full details about scope tags, see Use role-based access control and scope tags for distributed IT.

  1. Click Select scope tags to optionally add scope tags for the app.
  2. Click Next to display the Assignments page.

Step 3 - Assignments

  1. Select the Required, Available for enrolled devices, or Uninstall group assignments for the app. For more information, see Add groups to organize users and devices and Assign apps to groups with Microsoft Intune.

Note

Uninstall intend will only be displayed for LOB apps created with Install as managed set to Yes. For more information review App information section earlier on this article.

  1. Click Next to display the Review + create page.

Step 4 - Review + create

  1. Review the values and settings you entered for the app.

  2. When you are done, click Create to add the app to Intune.

    The Overview blade for the line-of-business app is displayed.

The app you have created appears in the apps list where you can assign it to the groups you choose. For help, see How to assign apps to groups.

Note

If the .pkg file contains multiple apps or app installers, then Microsoft Intune will only report that the app is successfully installed when all installed apps are detected on the device.

Update a line-of-business app

  1. Sign in to the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center.
  2. Select Apps > All apps.
  3. Find and select your app from the list of apps.
  4. Select Properties under Manage from the app pane.
  5. Select Edit next to App information.
  6. Click on the listed file next to Select file to update. The App package file pane is displayed.
  7. Select the folder icon and browse to the location of your updated app file. Select Open. The app information is updated with the package information.
  8. Verify that App version reflects the updated app package.

Note

For the Intune service to successfully deploy a new .pkg file to the device you must increment the package and string in the packageinfo file in your .pkg package.

Next steps

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Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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