Panasonic SAPT770PXK Service Manual — download free (Page 5 of 163)

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1 A HOWARD W. SAMS PUBLICATION OCTOBER 1966/50% PF Reporter the magazine of electronic servicing highlights TV Receivers ziz8 CLOD 4A11, 'O,v ) 'JAY 3OtSh3Ala 331ne3< Al S' nv3 n riwt rely! ;,,,,- i Recommended Equipment for Square -Wave Testing Gated -Beam FM Communications Detectors Wild Sync How to Sell TV Antennas More About TV AGC

2 SLACK LUMINANCE LEVEL BLACK EICO 380's color signals (3 primaries, 3 complementaries) cover fully 60% of the screen: thus tell you MORE about the set's response - enable EXACT alignment. SHARPLY DEFINED EDGES Now you can afford a True NTSC* Color Generator (NEW EICO ALL SOLID STATE 380 IS ONLY $169.) Every pro knows that the best generator to use to do the best, fastest, most accurate color servicing is the NTSC type. EICO is first to bring it to you at a serviceman price. The 380 takes the risky guesswork out of color servicing - because it gives you all test signals exactly like the Color TV station. So now you can be certain of exact results - faster, easier, for more profits per day. You'll also quickly become known as the pro who makes sets "come alive" with brilliant correct color response! Only EICO provides you with all these advanced engineering features at so low a cost: 100% true NTSC* full -field color signals, including both chrominance and luminance exactly as specified for a Color TV station transmission. No "Gun Killers" - Faster, easier use by feeding to the RF stage. You don't need to go inside the TV set to feed the color signal. is Each true NTSC* color signal covers fully 60% of the entire TV screen (as compared to 1 -inch from a rainbow generator) - this tells you a full, true picture of what's going on inside the set - all the way from the RF to the screen. 100% solid state (33 transistors). 5 individual switch -selected alignment patterns for monochrome and color. Individual, switch - selected full -field color display. Generates I, Q, R -Y, and B -Y signals for demodulator adjustment, plus 7 standard color signals (3 primaries, 3 complementaries, plus black and white). Adjustable bar width and dot size down to just visible for exact convergence. 3 crystal -controlled oscillators for true 3.58 MC color signal generation, pattern timing, and RF output. Drift -free RF output (crystal -controlled Channel 3) and video output. Conveniently compact: 8" high x 5" wide x 6" long. Portable and light weight (only 4 lbs.) for easier field use. Instant -on operation: time -saving, accurate, drift -free. Excellent for field or shop. And will not become obsolete! Why buy an old-fashioned semi -accurate non-ntsc rainbow generator when you can get all the extra benefits of a 100% TRUE NTSC COLOR GENERATOR for the same money. See your EICO dealer today for a free demonstration. Unbeatable Value COMPLETE COLOR / BW TV LAB With the plus just the 369 & you're ready for anything in Color/ BW servicing: EICO 369 Sweep/ Marker Generator gives easiest, fastest visual alignment of color or B&W TV and FM RF and IF circuits. Five sweep ranges from 3-220mc. Four marker ranges from mc. Crystal marker oscillator. Post injection of markers. $99.95 kit, $ wired. EICO 435 Direct -Coupled Wideband Scope. DC-4.5mc with 3" flat - face CRT. Zener calibrator. Outperforms 5" scopes three times its price. $ kit, $ wired. How about FM -MX Stereo? Just add EICO 342 FM -MX Signal Generator: Gives both composite audio and FM RF outputs. Inputs for stereo audio, critical A/B tests. $ wired. *The NTSC (National Television Systems Committee) color signal is based on the fact that each transmitted color is produced by an NTSCdefined relationship between a 3.58 MC reference and a 3.58 MC chroma modulated subcarrier, with each color having a standard NTSC brightness component. This is the basis upon which all color -TV broadcasters must operate. There are no separate rules for color -TV reception, or color test sets. EICO Send me FREE: EICO Electronic Instrument Co., Inc th Ave., Flushing, N.Y "Definitive Comparison of NTSC and rainbow generators FROM THE SERVICEMAN'S VIEWPOINT." 32 -page catalog on 200 EICO best buys. D Name of nearest dealer. NAME ADDRESS CITY STATF ZIP

3 Highlights of 1967 TV Lines by J. W. Phipps ADMIRAL The 1967 line of black -and-white receivers offered by Admiral comprises 21 portables (with 13", 15", 19", and 21" screen sizes), two 23" table models, and ten' 23" console models. All models, with the exception of the 13" and 15" portables, use carryover chassis introduced in '65 and '66. Continued chassis include G346-3, used in three 19" portable models; G5, used in five 19" portables; 7G7, used in one 19" portable, one 21" portable, two 23" table models, and six 23" consoles; 8G7, used in a 19" portable equipped with a remote unit; 9G5, used in four 21" portables; and 3G5, used in four 23" consoles. An "Instant Play" circuit, which provides immediate sound and picture when the set is turned on, is available in one of the 19" portables, one of the 21" portables, the two 23" table models, and in five versions of the 23" console line. Completely new chassis are used in the 13" and 15" portables. Chassis HI -IA, used in the Playmate three -model 13" series, and Chassis H2-1A, used in the Vagabond two -model 15" series (shown here), and the Executive 15" model, are basically alike in all respects, except of course, picture tubes. Both CRT types, the 13CP4 used in the HI -IA and the 15JP4 used in the H2-1A, are square -cornered and flat -faced, with a steel bonded frame around the faceplate. Compactrons are used liberally in the new chassis. A 23Z9 double-triode/pentode compactron serves the triple functions of sync separator (triode section), vertical oscillator (triode section), and vertical output (pentode section). Another double - triode / pentode compactron, a 14BRII, performs the functions of sound IF amplifier (triode section), video amplifier (pentode section), and AGC (triode section. Additional compactrons include a 17BF11 double pentode, used in the sound detector and sound output stages. and a 33GY7A diode/pentode employed in the horizontal output and damper stages. The horizontal phase detector uses the twin diode section of an 8LT8 twin-diode/pentode, while the pentode section of the same tube serves the horizontal oscillator stage. Completing the tube complement of the main chassis are an 8BM11 double -pentode compactron, used in the 1st and 2nd picture IF's. and the 1BC2 high -voltage rectifier. The transformerless low -voltage power supply uses a single silicon diode with a 5.5 -ohm fusible resistor providing surge and overload protection. A series filament string and polarized line cord are used in the chassis. CHANNEL MASTER Two new chassis are featured in Channel Master's line for the coming year. In addition, Model 6573, a tube -type 12" portable introduced last year, will continue to be offered. The first of the new models is an 11" transistorized portable receiver, Model Two printed -circuit boards, mounted on the vertical chassis, contain most of the video, sound, and sweep circuitry. The only tubes employed in the set are three 5642B diodes, used in the high -voltage tripler arrangement shown here. The transformer -powered low -voltage supply, capable of operation from either an AC or DC source, employs a bridge type rectifier and electronic filter. A battery charging circuit is provided for use with an accessory, rechargeable, battery pack. Line overload protection is provided by a 5 -amp fuse in the transformer primary, with B+ protection afforded by a.5 -amp fuse in the rectifier output circuit. HUHIL UU1PUi HV RECT vl 5642B DO NOT MEASURE 1 HORIZ AFC A solid-state complement of 28 transistors and 21 diodes is used in the receiver circuitry, which includes three stages of video IF, two video amplifier stages, two stages of sound IF, and two stages of audio amplification. Blocking oscillators are used in the vertical and horizontal sweep circuits. Solid-state diodes are used profusely throughout the set, serving such functions as a pulse gate between the AGC keyer collector and the horizontal -output transformer, as oscillator protection in both the vertical and horizontal circuits, as a boost rectifier, and as a wave -shaping diode in the horizontal -output circuit. Two separate AGC circuits are employed in this receiver. Both circuits are shown here. One is a keyed system employing an amplifier and keyer stage, with an input reference level from the video amplifier. This keyed circuit is used to control the video IF gain. The second AGC circuit is a delayed system that samples the output of the 1st video IF and uses this reference level to control the VHF tuner gain. The other new set is a transformerless 16" tube -type portable, Model Included in the tube complement are four compactrons: a double pentode 17BF11 used in the sound detector and sound output stages; a triode/beam pentode 17JZ8 used in the vertical oscillator and output stages; a 17BE3 diode used in the damper; and finally, a double-diode/double KV HV DOUBLER 5642B DO NOT MEASURE v3 50opf -r- 7KV HV TRIPLER 5642B DO NOT MEASURE C5 (11.8KV) 11-12KV PF REPORTER, October, 1966 Vol. 16, No. 10. PF REPORTER is published monthly by Howard W. Sams R Co., Inc., 4300 W. 62nd, Indianapolis, Indiana Second-class postage paid at Indianapolis, Indiana. 1, 2 & 3 year subscription prices; U.S.A., its possessions and Canada: $5.00. $8.00, $ Other countries: $6.00, $10.00, $ Current single issues 50e each; back issues 66C each. October, 1966/PF REPORTER 1

4 ADMIRAL G3 CHASSIS NO. 5 ckt brkr ckt brkr ckt brkr FR 5.5 fuse 5 amp fuse.5 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 1.2 amp fuse.4 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 2.3 amp fuse 1 amp fuse 1.2 amp use 1.2 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 1.5 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 1.5 amp fuse 1 amp fuse 1.5 amp ckt brkr ckt brkr ckt brkr FR 5 ckt brkr fuse 1.5 amp ckt brkr ckt brkr ckt brkr ckt brkr ckt brkr link link #26 link #26 link #26 link' triode 8B10 used in the keyed AGC circuit, sync separator, and horizontal phase detector stage. DUMONT Two new 19" portables, the "Saturn" and "Apollo," are featured in Dumont's 1967 b -w line. The two chassis, which are similar except for a three-hour clock timer included in the Apollo, employ 1ST VIDEO IF BASE Sac 10mí AGC BIAS AGC AMP 2SB V u.4v B 8.3V R83 47 sac 0 AGC 15K LEVEL three stages of video 1F amplification, a "quick -on" picture and sound feature, a picture optimizer to customize reception, and illuminated channel indicators. One other 19" portable, a model continued from last year, is also offered. Rounding out Dumont's new line are the 23" models-three consoles and a table model. Featured on both the consoles and the VIDEO IF EMITTERS AGC GATE m1d AGC KEYER O2SA225 VIDEI AMP PULSE GATE CATH HORIZ OUTPUT TRANSFORMER table model is an illuminated, dual slide - rule control panel for both UHF and VHF tuning. The basic chassis used in the 23" models is an autotransformer-powered type with series connected filaments. A 1.2 -amp Chemfuse protects the low -voltage power supply. which uses a single silicon diode as a half -wave rectifier. The 1st video IF (housed on a separate circuit board) utilizes a 4EH7 pentode, as does the 2nd video TF. Other tubes include a 4EJ7 pentode in the 3rd video IF. an 8AW8A triode/pentode shared by the video amplifier and vertical oscillator. a 6LX8 triode/pentode serving the keyed AGC circuit and horizontal oscillator stage, and a 6LN8 triode/pentode used in the sync separator and sound TF stages. A 4DT6 pentode is used in the audio detector. while a 17CU5 (or 17C5) is used in the audio output circuit. The horizontal -output and damper circuits share a diode/pentode 38HE7 compactron. Rounding out the tube complement are the 1K3 high -voltage rectifier and the pentode 10CW5 vertical oscillator. A 231-IWP4 picture tube is used. EMERSON This company's line'of black -and -white 2 PF REPORTER/October, 1966

5 RCA CHASSIS NO. 5 amp use 1.5 amp fuse 2 amp ckt brkr ckt brkr fuse.5 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 2 amp ckt brkr fuse 1.25 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 1.75 amp fuse 1.8 amp fuse 1.7 amp fuse 2 amp fuse NA ckt brkr fuse 2 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 2 amp fuse 1.7 amp link #24 link #24 link #24 link #26 link ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS - In any column, CHECK MARK indicates chassis has feature; ASTERISK means "see text," NA means data not available at press time. For individulal columns -- B+ RECT: one sil, one silicon rectifier; NW dbl, half -wave silicon doubler; FWR, full -wave rectifier using two silicon diodes. IF AMP: Figure indicates number of stages. DC CPt means set has DC path or DC restoration in video drive circuit of CRT. AGC: First letter - A, transistorized keyer; B, transistor circuit (separate IF and tuner circuits); C, transistor gate circuit; M, multipurpose tube ('HS8, 'BU8, or similar); P, pentode keyer; T, triode keyer; S, simple (no tube). Second letter - C, has potentiometer; N, no AGC adjustment. NL (noise limiter): D, solid-state diode in transistor circuit; M, part of multipurpose tube ('HS8, 'BU8, etc.); N, transistor noise circuit; T, triode noise inverter. HORIZ AFC: CC, com- mon -cathode dual selenium diode; CT, common -cathode dual diode plus triode section of tube (controlling sinewave or Synchroguide oscillator); S, two selenium diodes in series; D, dual diode sections of tube; T, triode used. SOUND DET: quad, quadrature circuit; ratio, ratio detector circuit. FOCUS: jumper, set has wire from CRT to select voltage; pot, has focus potentiometer. PROTECTED CIRCUITS: figure following fuse is rating in amps; FR indicates fusible resistor and is followed by ating in ohms; link means short wire, of gauge indicated. television for the coming year ranges from a 9" transistorized AC -DC personal portable to a 23" console group featuring three compact consoles, three deluxe 38" wide consoles, and one table model Other sets are available in 12", 16", and 19" sizes. A total of 26 transistors and 13 solidstate diodes are used in the new 9" portable. In addition, a four -unit selenium assembly, connected as a bridge circuit, is used in the AC power supply. The only tubes used in the set, with the exception of the CRT, are three 5642 diodes, series connected in the high - voltage supply. The picture tube is an aluminized 90 A23-10WE. Three video IF and two video amplifier stages are used, along with two stages of sound IF and two stages of audio amplification. Both the UHF and VHF tuner are transistorized. As stated previously, the set is an AC -DC type and may be operated from an ordinary AC source or from the 12 -volt system of a car or boat using a special accessory power -cable assembly. The special accessory cable contains a built-in voltage regulator to prevent surge damage. Another optional item with this portable is a 12 -volt rechargeable battery and battery charger kit. The 12" portable model is also fully transistorized and can be operated from either AC or DC. The video IF section consists of four stagger -tuned stages. with the first two stages AGC controlled. Video amplification is accomplished by a two -stage section using one PNP germanium and one NPN silicon transistor. The video -output amplifier operates from a collector supply voltage of +80 volts. This voltage is obtained by rectifying a pulse at the primary of the high -voltage transformer. The sound IF. amplified and limited by two stages. is detected by a symmetrical ratio detector, which in turn feeds an audio driver and class "B" audio -output stage. Blocking oscillators are used in both the vertical and horisweep circuits. In the power supply, a bridge -type, full -wave rectifier and regulator circuit provides B+ voltage with the aid of a power transformer. The Model 12P50 tube -type 12" portable is retained from last year. Operating on AC only, the circuitry is of conventional design, using three video IF's, a single video amplifier, and one sound IF. The transformerless power supply uses one solid-state diode in a half -wave coni figuration. Series connected heaters are employed in the set, along with a 3IOJB4 picture tube. The 16" models and three of the 19" receivers use transformerless, series chassis which are electrically similar in most respects, except CRT sizes. One compactron, a 38HE7 diode/pentode. is used in the horizontal -output and damper stages. The remaining tubes and circuitry are relatively conventional. The 16" models use a 16CMP4 CRT. while the 19" models use a 19FJP4. The two top performance 19" sets use a transformer - powered chassis with Emerson's "Quick - On" feature and a three -stage vidco 1F. In addition, one of the models is equipped with a three-hour sleep switch timer. October, 1966/PF REPORTER 3

6 GENERAL ELECTRIC Compactrons are used extensively in General Electric's black -and -white offerings for '67. Six basic chassis are used in a model line which varies from an 11" TV/clock-radio combination to thirteen 23" consoles. Also included is an all -transistor chassis used in three 12" and two 16" portables. The AC chassis, used in the 23" consoles and two 23" table models, is a transformer -powered horizontal type employing two printed -circuit boards. This chassis is a good example of the wide use of compactrons, found throughout General Electric's '67 line. A double - pentode 6AR11 is shared by the first two stages of the three stage picture IF; the video amplifier. audio amplifier, and sync clipper are served by a double -triode/ pentode 6AF11; a double -pentode 6T10 is used in the audio detector and audio - output stage; and a twin -triode 6FY7 performs in the vertical -oscillator and vertical -output circuits. Other compactrons include a 6GE5 beam pentode in the horizontal -output stage, a 1 AD2 diode in the high -voltage rectifier, a 6AX3 diode in the damper circuit, and a double -diode/ pentode 6LT8 in the horizontal phase detector and oscillator. The only conventional tube used in the main chassis is a triode/pentode 6JN8, used in the 3rd picture IF and AGC keyer stages. The DC. SC. and VC chassis are all electrically similar, varying only in the tube complement and CRT types. As in the AC chassis, compactrons are found in most stages. A half -wave rectifier, series connected filaments, and two -stage picture IF are common to the three chassis. B+ overload protection is provided by a 1.5 -amp fuse. The DC chassis is used in fourteen 19" and two 21" table models. while the SC chassis is employed in five 12" and three 16" table models. The VC chassis is used in the 11" TV/clockradio combination. The transistorized TC chassis, used in five portable models, employs a three - stage picture IF, two stages of video amplification. two audio IF stages, a two - stage audio amplifier, and a push-pull audio -output stage. The AGC system is a two -stage circuit with individual controls for both tuner and IF AGC voltage. A grounded -emitter buffer stage provides isolation between the horizontal -oscillator and horizontal -output circuits. Three power input circuit variations are used with the TC chassis, depending upon the model. However, all three variations use a full -wave rectifier configuration for AC operation, as well as a regulator circuit consisting of three transistors and one Zener diode. Model TR810CTN, a 12" set, is designed for AC operation only. Twelve -inch models TR812CVY and TR814CEB are capable of either AC or DC operation, with the latter model equipped with a built-in battery charger. Both 16" models are designed for AC -DC operation. The AC - DC models can be operated from either a battery or a 12 -volt (negative ground) automobile system. Chassis ETV is offered in a "C" line 23" table model with a tone control and speaker jac. 4 PF REPORTER/October, 1966 MAGNAVOX Concentrating on large -screen b -w television, Magnavox will continue to offer 24" and 27" screen sizes along with 19" and 23" models. Three chassis are used in this manufacturer's '67 line. Last year's transistorized T908 chassis is utilized in five 23" consoles, seven 23" table models, two 24" table models, seven 24" consoles, and three 27" consoles. Nine tube -type 19" portables use Chassis T910, which is similar to the T914 chassis introduced previously. The T910 chassis is a series filament type with the majority of circuitry contained on one printed -circuit board. A bonded faceplate CRT. type 19FLP4 or 19FTP4, is used. The video IF circuitry consists of two 4BZ6 pentodes in the 1st and 2nd IF amplifiers and a 4CB6 pentode in the 3rd IF. The 1st and 2nd IF stages are AGC controlled by a keyed AGC circuit. A 1N60 germanium diode is used as the video detector and is mounted in the 3rd video IF shield can. The single stage of video amplification employs the pentode section of a logn8 triode/pentode. The triode section of the same tube is used as the sync separator. A 13V10 double pentode serves the quadrature sound detector and output stage, while a 4AU6A pentode performs in the sound IF circuit. The sweep circuits are relatively conventional and employ a double -triode 8FQ7 in the common -cathode horizontal oscillator, an 18GB5 pentode in the horizontal -output stage, and a triode/pentode 15KY8 in the vertical multivibrator-output stage. A dual selenium diode is used in the horizontal AFC. - A 1G3GT diode is employed in the high -voltage supply and a 17AY3 serves the damper. The low -voltage supply is a transformerless half -wave rectifier and uses a single silicon diode. with overload protection from a 4.7 -ohm fusible resistor. Four other 19" portable models use the transistorized T915 chassis. Employing a total of 22 transistors (18 on the main chassis, three in the VHF tuner, TP 0 t HORIZ OUTPUT TRANSFORMER VHF TUNER O 1.8K 3.7V AGC KEY R -1N 1.2V 50 I V and one in the UHF tuner) plus 22 diodes and one dual diode (used in the horizontal AFC), this chassis is all solid state except for the 1K3 high -voltage rectifier and 19FLP4 or 19DWP4 CRT. Three stages of video IF are provided, along with a driver and an output stage. A single IF stage, a ratio detector, an audio driver, and an output stage make up the sound circuits. Blocking oscillators, drivers, and output stages are used in both the horizontal and vertical circuits. The AGC circuit used in Chassis T915 and T908 is shown here. It consists of two stages, a keyer and a driver. With an extremely weak input signal the keyer remains cut off, and the only AGC developed is the charge across capacitor C236 (obtained from the 12 -volt regulated supply). This bias voltage is applied to the 2nd IF stage and biases it so that maximum gain is provided in this stage. With a further increase in the input signal level, the keyer stage conducts, and the charge on C236 increases because of the collector current in the keyer transistor. This increased charge, in turn, increases the forward bias on the 2nd IF transistor, which also increases its collector current. Because the transistors used in the stages under discussion are designed to work with forward AGC. an increase in forward bias results in a reduction in gain. In addition, an increase in the collector current of the 2nd IF transistor is reflected back to the 1st IF transistor in the form of increased forward bias, and a reduction in gain of the 1st IF results. As the incoming signal increases to a signal of average strength, the increase across C236 is applied to the VDR (voltage dependent resistor). decreasing its resistance and causing the driver transistor to conduct. A positive voltage is developed across R101 and is applied to the RF amplifier in the VHF tuner, adding to the fixed bias on this stage and reducing its gain. When the IF AGC voltage reaches approximately 5 volts, diode D204 becomes forward biased and prevents the IF AGC voltage 2 10V GMV 4.5V 4V K 3.5V 4.2V % AGC DRIVER.5V 47K 2ND VIDEO - IF AMP BASE VIDEO DRIVER EMITTER 1.3K 5% 12V 1.5V 2200= 3RD VIDEO IF BASE tpmfd 15V

7 AC INPUT : 1000 GMV T 1000 GMV 145V 1000 GMV 1000I GMV 1000 GMV 6.3V 1. 2K 2w V from increasing further. On extremely strong input signals when the RF AGC voltage reaches approximately 7 volts, diode D205 becomes forward biased, allowing a portion of the RF AGC voltage to be added to the IF AGC voltage which increases the forward bias on the 2nd IF transistor and reduces its gain still further. A unique feature of the T908 and T915 chassis is the power supply circuit. As shown here, there are five separate voltage sources: 110 volts used to power the audio -output stage, 140 volts used to power the video -amplifier stage volts used to power the horizontal driver, 68 volts used in the sweep output stages, and a regulated 12 volts used in the remaining circuits. Also available is a VAC source which is used only for the picture tube filaments and any dial indicator lamps that may be used (depending upon model). MOTOROLA Two new chassis, TS -461 and TS -594, are included in Motorola's '67 b -w line. which consists of 20 models using 12 versions of five basic chassis. Fifteen are new models and five are models that were introduced last December. Model types and sizes in the new line include two 12" portables, two 16" portables, three 19" portables, three 21" table models, two 23" table models, and eight 23" consoles. Two of the 19" portables are new; the other five portables are carryover models. The table and console models are all new. The most notable feature of this manufacturer's '67 chassis is the increased use of transistors in the low-level signal stages. In addition, all chassis feature four -circuit VHF tuners with frame grid RF amplifiers, transistorized UHF tuners, silicon diode in the B+ supplies, and horizontal and vertical retrace blanking. All picture tubes utilize built-in implosion protection, therefore do not require the use of a safety glass. With one exception (TS-596), all chassis have a considerable y 200V V ` 25V 82 5% 5W 14. 5V 12V V portion of the circuitry mounted on etched boards. The two 12" "Cadet" portables use either the retained TS -454 chassis or the new TS -461, which is electrically the same as the TS The main difference between the two horizontally mounted chassis is in the mechanical construction. The tuners and control bracket of the TS -46l are supported by a vertical side member on the chassis instead of being mounted to the cabinet as in the TS This difference in construction allows the TS -461 chassis to be removed as a unit for servicing. The new TS -594, introduced in a total of 13 receivers, is a transformer - powered hybrid chassis utilizing transistors in the low-level signal circuits and tubes in the output stages, as well as in the VHF tuner. Models using this chassis include three 21" table models, two 23" table models, and eight 23" consoles. Although the tube circuits are electrically similar to last year's TS -589, the TS -594 is more compact -a feature made possible by the saving in space realized from the use of transistorized circuits. The transistorized stages are contained on an etched circuit board mounted in the center of the horizontal chassis and include the three -stage video IF's, the 1st video amplifier, the video output, the audio IF, audio driver, the AGC gate and amplifier circuits, and the noise gate and sync separator circuits. A total of 11 transistors are used. The diode complement consists of 10 diodes and two silicon power rectifiers on the main chassis, plus one diode in the UHF tuner. Six tubes are employed on the main chassis (plus 2 in the VHF tuner), including three compactrons: a 6JN6 beam pentode, used in the horizontal -output stage; a 6A13 diode in the damper circuit; and a 3AT2, used in the high -voltage rectifier. Other tube types are: a triode/pentode 6BL8 shared by the vertical and horizontal oscillators, a beam pentode 6GK6 in the vertical -output stage, and a 6GK6 pentode in the audio -output circuit. An added feature of the TS -594 chassis is an "optimizer" control (shown here), which reduces the effects of high - frequency noise on the picture. The control, located at the rear of the chassis, decreases the video amplifier high -frequency peaking for noisy signals and increases the peaking for noise -free signals. If a strong noise -free signal is being received, the "optimizer" should be set in the "sharp" position to obtain maximum picture detail. The remaining two chassis used this year are carryovers. Chassis TS -596 is used in one 19" portable model retained from last year. Two 16" and two 19" portables (new models) use the TS -597 chassis, which was introduced in December of last year. PHILCO A new hybrid chassis (using both transistors and tubes) is introduced in Philco's 19" Sportster, 21" Premier, and 23" Custom series. Also newly introduced is a tube -type chassis (17C21A) used in the 12" Caddy models. The remaining models, with 9", 17", 19" and 23" CRT's use either carryover chassis or those introduced in December of last year. In all, ten chassis designations and ten model series are included in the '67 line. This year's "O" line hybrid chassis is similar in many respects to last year's "P" line hybrid (the 16JT26). Solid-state VHF and UHF tuners are still used, as are a transistorized three -stage IF and two -stage AGC. The 3rd IF transistor, a TV 16 in the 16JT26, has been replaced by a TV20 in the new chassis. Another addition to the 1966 hybrid is a solidstate noise switch, shown here. Basically, the noise switch is an "on -off" device in the cathode of the sync separator. Normally, the noise switch is conducting and allows regular sync separation. When a noise pulse appears, the noise switch is driven into cutoff and thus opens the cathode circuit of the sync separator. This prevents the transfer of the noise pulse into the sync circuits. All versions of this year's hybrid chassis (Chassis 17JT41, 17LT43. and 17NT- 45) utilize a power transformer and full - wave rectifier to develop 190 volts of tube B+ (as compared to 150 volts in 1965). The transistor B+ supply has been increased from 12 volts to 15 volts and is developed by a half -wave rectifier fed by a secondary winding on the power trans - October, 1966/PF REPORTER 5

8 STAGEsrAGES AGC GATE 6KR8A jl.05v SYNC SEP 3.8V 70V 3 18K 1W HORIZ AND VERT SWEEP SECTIONS nh 47K 5% 150K 190V B+ 680 former, rather than by a winding on the horizontal -output transformer, as was the case in the 16JT26 chassis. The AGC circuit in this chassis is basically the same as that used in the 16JT26. Two transistors are used, one as the AGC gate and the other as the AGC amplifier. Chassis 17J27 and 17J27A (identical except for different VHF tuners) are respresentative of the all -tube chassis Philco is offering this year. The transformerless chassis uses a single circuit board and series connected filaments. B- is supplied by a single silicon half -wave rectifier and protected by a reset type circuit breaker mounted on the volume control. Two circuit modules are used, one containing the IF input traps and the other, the video detector circuit. Another notable feature of the chassis is the use of compactrons. A 17JZ8 triode/beam pentode is used in the vertical oscillator and vertical -output stage; and a beam pentode 21GY5 is employed in the horizontal -output stage. The remaining cornpactron, a 17BE3 diode, serves the damper circuit. Also employed in this chassis (and this year's 17N35) are a gated triode AGC circuit and triode noise inverter, both similar to the comparable circuits used in last year's "P" line. RCA A total of 12 chassis make up RCA's '67 black -and -white line. Included are five continuing chassis and seven "recently introduced" units. The continuing chassis are the 19" KCS144 and KCS145 portables, the 16" KCSI52 portable, and the 23" KCS136M used in three console models. Also continued, but changed, is the transistorized 12" KCS153 chassis. Redesignated KCS153X, this portable receiver now employs an integrated circuit (a television first) in the sound section. An equivalent circuit diagram of the integrated circuit (IC) is shown here. along with another illustration that indicates the receiver stages contained within the chip. The IC actually performs the functions of 26 conventional components. Other changes in the basic KCS153 include a video bias adjustment, which sets the operating level of the video amplifiers. Also, a new RF amplifier transistor, type 3504, is used in the KRK126B VHF tuner. Five 19" portables and two 21" portables are contained in the "recently introduced" chassis line. Two new horizontally 6 PF REPORTER/October, K M.05V TV 17 NOISE SWITCH 65V N.S. T. P. 33K 25K NOISE ADJ 1.6K 5% VIDEO OUTPUT V 470µH mounted, transformer -powered chassis with two IF stages are used in two of the 19" models. The chassis, KCS156 and KCS163, use one circuit board which contains most of the circuitry. KCS163, shown here in the 19" Damosel model, also uses a new Nuvistor, four -circuit VHF tuner (KRK133D). Chassis KCS159, another horizontally mounted, transformer- powered chassis, features a solid-state AGC stage, a solidstate sound IF circuit, and a separate "sync and sound amplifier." Completing the 19" portable group are Chassis KCS160 and KCS164. Both chassis are vertically mounted, have a two - stage IF, and employ an autotransformerequipped B+ supply and series connected filaments. Featured in both chassis are vertical and horizontal blanking, fixed AGC, and a spot elimination circuit which places a high positive potential on the cathode of the 19EFP4A picture tube when the set is turned off. The basic difference in the two chassis is the type of VHF tuner employed. The KCS164 uses the KRK133C Nuvistor four -circuit tuner, while the KCS160 employs a KRK frame -grid, three -circuit tuner. Also, a new frame -grid 4EH7 pentode is used in the 1st video IF stage of the KCS164 to provide better matching for the tuner. A miniature, transistorized UHF tuner (KRK122) is used in both chassis. The two 21" chassis, KCS161 and 1 r: 2 o- r Ole (Ng) GRD ä 1.5 VOLTS V. PQ1FR INPUT ISRIC Ir 5á SOON. N,.} y M1PlIPNR "MT OTOR IR i ë2 POWER WUTION STAá TO AUDIO DRIVER KCS162, are also similar except for the VHF tuner. Both chassis are vertically mounted and utilize two circuit boards. Other features are a two -stage video IF circuit and a transformerless voltage doubler B+ supply. SYLVANIA Four transistorized 12" personal portables head up Sylvania's 16 -model black - and -white line for '67. Two of the 12" sets (chassis A04) are designed for AC operation only, while the other two are capable of AC or DC operation. One model, the GT12, is a carryover from last year. All use transformer -powered chassis with gated AGC, DC picture restoration, horizontal blanking, transistorized VHF and UHF tuners, and pre-set fine tuning. Like all sets in this manufacturer's b -w line, overload protection is provided by a reset type circuit breaker. The two "AC -only" models are identical, except that Model 12P16 is equipped with an earphone jack. -Lighted channel selectors, earphone jack, and minor cabinet features are the only differences in the two AC -DC models. Three tube -type and one solid-state model (Chassis A06) are offered in the 19" portable group. A transistorized noise -suppression circuit is featured in two of the tube types (Models 19P38 and 19P39). The third tube -type chassis features illuminated VHF -UHF channel II) 10 o4 J 9

9 .14 windows and preset fine tuning. All three tube types employ silicon voltage doublers, DC restoration, horizontal blanking, gated AGC, tube -type (frame grid) VHF tuners, and transistorized UHF tuners. The transistorized 19" portable includes most of the features of the tube types, except that the chassis is transformer powered. In addition, both the VHF and UHF tuners are transistorized. The 19" table model group consists of three models including two tube -type chassis and one solid-state compact set (Chassis A07). Features of these receivers are much the same as those found. in the conventional tube and transistorized 19" portables. Added to the transistor table model are a preset volume control, variable tone control, and power transformer. Two table models and three consoles are presented in the 23" category. Transformer -powered tube -type chassis with transistorized noise -suppression circuits are used in all five models. SYMPHONIC A new solid-state 3" personal portable, weighing only 51 lbs with batteries, highlights Symphonic's '67 presentations. The "Mini 3," as the 3" model is aptly named, operates on a self-contained "C" cell battery or on a rechargeable battery pack, car or boat battery, or on ordinary AC. One noteworthy feature of the unit is its ability to play and recharge the battery pack simultaneously when operating on AC. More specific circuit details on this particular model were not available at press time. Other models include an 11" transistorized portable, a 12", and a 19" tube -type portable. The solid-state 11" set uses a transformer -powered bridge circuit and a three -transistor voltage regulator to provide 12 volts when operating on AC. During DC operation, only the voltage regulator is used. A 1.5 -amp fuse is used for battery pack protection and a.5-amp fuse provides AC line protection. 8+ protection is provided by a 1.5 -amp fuse. Two circuit boards contain most of the main chassis circuitry, which includes three video stages, two sound IF stages, two stages of sound amplification, and two stages of video amplification. The high - voltage power supply is designed around three 5642B diodes. The 12" tube -type chassis is an "AC only" chassis with series connected filaments and a transformerless half -wave low -voltage power supply. A 2 -amp fuse assures line overload protection. Four compactrons are used in this set. One, a double-diode/double-triode 8B10, is used in the AGC, sync separator, and horizontal phase detector circuits. A double -pentode 17BF11 serves the sound detector and sound -output stages. The horizontal - output and damper stages use a diode/ pentode 33GY7, and the combination vertical -oscillator / vertical -output circuit employe a triode/beam pentode 17JZ8. TRUETONE Picture sizes varying from 9" to 23" are offered in Truetone's new line. Included in the portable group are a 9" transistorized model, one 12", one 16". and three 19" models. The console group is available in only the 23" size. The transistorized 9" portable, which operates from either AC or DC, employs 24 transistors and 14 diodes. A built-in charger circuit is provided for use with a rechargeable 12 -volt battery pack (offered as an accessory), which permits up to four hours of operation. A recharge time of ten hours is required once the battery has provided the maximum four hours of operation. A three -stage picture IF, using PNP transistors, and two stages of video amplification (also using PNP transistors) serve the cathode of the 230DB4 picture tube. The low -voltage supply utilizes a bridge - type rectifier and power transformer for AC operation. Overload protection is provided by a.5 -amp fuse during AC operation and by a 2 -amp fuse when the battery is used. The only tube circuit (except the CRT) employed in the receiver is the high -voltage supply which uses three 1D -K29 diodes in a voltage - tripler configuration. Two stages of IF amplification, a ratio detector, a driver stage, and a push-pull output stage make up the sound section. In addition, a two-way earphone jack is provided for either earphone only or earphone/speaker operation. Two chassis types are used with the 23" console models. Three of the consoles use a transformer -powered chassis equipped with Truetone's "Insta-Vu" and a tinted, aluminized, bonded 23FMP4 or 23GBP4 picture tube. A two -stage picture IF, a single stage of video amplification. and one sound IF amplifier áre used in the chassis. The remaining 23" console uses a transformerless chassis with series connected filaments and a 23GJP4 picture tube The tube -type portable models use chassis that are similar in most respects except for the tube complement and CRl type. Basically the chassis are transformerless types employing series connected filaments, two -picture IF stages, and single -stage video and sound IF amplifiers. The half -wave low -voltage power supply uses a single silicon rectifier. Compactrons are used in the 12" and 19" chassis. Those used in the 12" set include a double-diode/double-triode 8B10. shared by the AGC, synce separator, and horizontal AFC stages; a diode/pentode 33GY7 serving the horizontal -output and damper circuits; a triode/beam pentode 171Z8 in the combination vertical oscillator-output circuit; and a double -pentode 17BFlI in the sound detector and audio output stages. The 19" chassis uses a 17BE3 diode in the damper circuit and a 2IGY5 in the horizontal -output stage. WESTINGHOUSE From all indications, this manufacturer has few changes for '67 and will continue using the same chassis that carried last year's models, with two exceptions: Chassis V2486. previously used in 19" models. is to be dropped, while a new transistorized version, Chassis V will be used in some 19" models for the coming year. Those chassis retained are V-2487, used in both 23" and 19" sets, and V- 2490, used in the '12" models. The transistorized V uses 23 transistors in the main chassis and four in the tuners. The only tube used (besides the CRT) is a IK3 high -voltage rectifier. The low -voltage power supply, illustrated here, consists of two separate rectifier circuits. A full -wave rectifier supplies 75 volts to the regulator circuit, which in turn provides two regular outputs: a regulated 60 volts for the audio output, vertical output, horizontal driver, and horizontal output stages; and a regulated 12 volts for the remainder of the circuitry -with the exception of the video output. A conventional half -wave rectifier is employed to provide the 250 volts needed by the video -output stage. Two other noteworthy features are found in the V I chassis. They are a "white level control" and a noise cancellation circuit (both illustrated here). The "white level" control, in the hase circuit of the 1st video amplifier. functions as follows: l'he "white level" of the composite video signal is the "grassy" area between the bases of the blanking pedestal (as pointed out in the partial schematic) and represents the maximum conduction level of the CRT. Since the 1st and 2nd video amplifiers are emitter followers, the composite video signal is passed from the video detector, through the video amplifiers, to the hase of the video -output transistor without phase inversion. The "white level" adjustment controls the hase voltage of the 1st video amplifier, and because there is no phase inversion between the 1st video amplifier October, 1966/PF REPORTER 7

10 and video -output stage. it effectively controls the maximum conduction level of the CRT. This control is preset at the factory to provide maximum conduction desired in the video -output transistor and should not require adjustment unless one of the three video amplifiers changes characteristics or is replaced. The noise cancellation circuit shunts the 1st video amplifier stage. In the illustration, two noise pulses are shown riding along in the video information at the detector output. The noise canceller removes these pulses by inverting them and coupling them back to the video signal where they mix with, and cancel, the original noise pulses. The noise- adjust control is adjusted to a point just before the picture bends. ZENITH Nine model groups using nine horizontally mounted chassis are presented in Zenith's black -and-white line for '67. CRT sizes range from 12" to 23". Chassis 13X15, with either a 12EP4 or 12CBP4 CRT (not interchangeable), is used in the two 12" personal portable models. Features of this chassis include the use of the following compactrons: a diode/pentode 38HE7 in the horizontal and damper circuits, a triode/pentode 17JZ8 shared by the vertical oscillator and output stage, and a 17AB10 used in the sound -detector and sound -output circuits. Other tubes employed are: three 4BZ6 pentodes in the three -stage IF, a 4HS8 twin pentode in the AGC and sync stages, and a triode/pentode 10JT8 shared by the sound limiter (triode section) and video amplifier. A 1.8 -amp pigtail fuse protects the low -voltage supply, which uses a single silicon diode. The two 16" lightweight portable models use either a 14X21 or 14M21 chassis. The basic difference in the two chassis is the tube complement. Both chassis use a full -wave voltage doubler (two silicon diodes) protected by a 1.7 -amp fuse, and like the previously mentioned 13X15 chassis, have series connected filaments and a three -stage picture IF. Chassis 14N33, 14N29, 14N28, and 14N27 are used in nine "Slim Line" and "Skyline" 19" portables. Chassis 14N33 and 14N29 are identical in every respect except for the addition of a filter choke in the ground return side of the AC input of Chassis 14N29. Series connected filaments and a full -wave voltage doubler B+ supply are used in the chassis, with overload protection provided by a 2 -amp fuse. Compactrons are used in the sound detector and sound output (double-pen- tode 13Z10), AGC/sync clipper and vertical output (triode/twin pentode 8BA11), horizontal output (17JN6 beam pentode). high -voltage rectifier (2AS2 diode), and damper 22BW3 diode). Chassis 14N28 and 14N27 are similar to 14N33 and 14N29 with the exception of the tube complement and low -voltage power supply. Both chassis are transformer powered with full -wave voltage doublers and parallel filaments. In addition, Chassis 14N27 uses either a 19CXP4 or 19DBP4 CRT (not interchangeable) as compared to the three other chassis which use 19GAP4 picture tubes. Two of the "Skyline" series 19" receivers. Models X1943 and X1946, are equipped with Zenith's Space Command "300" remote control unit. The four 21" "Award Series" portables use Chassis 14N26, which is identical to the 14N28 chassis described previously. with the exception of the 21FXP4 CRT. Model X2145 of the series is equipped with the Space Command "300" transistorized remote unit. Chassis 14N22 (similar to 14N26, 14N27, and 14N28, with the exception of the tube complement and CRT) is used in the 23" model line which includes three table models and six consoles. One table Model, X2343, is remote controlled through the use of a transistorized Space Command "400" remote unit. Tube types used in the 14N22 chassis include compactrons in the high -voltage rectifier (2AS2 diode) and combination vertical oscillator -vertical output circuit (double - triode 6FM7). Other tube types are two 6BZ6 pentodes, used in the 1st and 2nd IF; a 6EJ7 pentode, used in the 3rd IF; a 6JT8 triode/pentode, used in the video amplifier and sound limiter stages; a 6Z10 twin pentode, used in the detector and output stages of the sound system; and a 61-1S8 twin pentode performing in the sync clipper and AGC circuits. Rounding out the tube types are a triode/ pentode 6GH8A or 6KD8, used in the horizontal control and oscillator stages; a 6JN6 pentode serving in the horizontal - output circuit; and finally, a 6AY3 in the damper. Overload protection is provided the full -wave B+ supply by a 2 -amp Belfuse in the primary side of the power transformer. The parallel filaments are protected by a 11/2" loop of #24 copper wire. OTHER U.S. BRANDS Editor's Note: Complete information from these companies had not been received by press time. The information presented below is all that we were able to obtain. Andrea is marketing two 23" sets, one a table model and the other a custom model for "built-in" installations. Also included in this manufacturer's new line are a 19" portable and an all -transistor 9" portable (AC -DC). Electrohome is offering 16 b -w models for the coming year. Nine portables and seven consoles make up the line. The portable group will include an undetermined number of 19" models and one 11" fully -transistorized, battery -operated portable. Four -stage transistorized. video IF circuits; power transformers; and hand - wired circuits are additional features of this company's '67 line. Olympics b -w line for '67 will include fifteen new models. Heading the list of new sets will be four new 23" combinations equipped with Olympic's "Rapid On" feature and stereo phonographs, with a choice of either AM. AM/FM, or AM/FM/FMS radios. Three of the models are also equipped with an "all-at - once" feature which enables the TV. radio, and phonograph to be played simultaneously in different rooms. Other new models include seven 23" consoles. three 19" portables. and a 21" table model. A full -feature clock with timer and sleep - switch is available on one of the portable models. Packard Bell's '67 line includes a 9" AC -DC solid-state portable with optional battery pack. Larger screen b -w sets in the line are three 19" portables, two 19" table models, a 23" table model, and four 23" consoles. Hand -wired chassis are still used in the tube models, along with other features that include keyed AGC, three stages of video IF, and "set-n -forget" volume and VHF fine tuning controls. Sparton of Canada has included a 23" portable in their new line. Other models include four transformer -powered 23" consoles, a transformerless 23" table model, and three 12" and five 19" portables. Two of the 19" portables are transformer -powered and one is equipped with an AM radio. The 12" model series comprises one basic model with a dual sound system and one with an AM radio. All 23" and 19" chassis have keyed AGC. B+ overload protection provided by a circuit breaker. quadrature detectors, and a three -stage video IF. FROM JAPAN Delmonico's '67 line includes five 23" combination models, one 23" consolette, one 19" lightweight portable, one 12" portable, one 9" transistorized portable. and a 41/2" all -transistor, battery -operated model. The combination models are available in different variations featuring separate audio systems, self-contained stereo phono or multiplex. in addition to AM/FM-FM multiplex radio units. Chassis design includes three -stage picture IF, handwired construction, and in some combo models, a push-pull audio output circuit. The allttransistor, 41/2" battery - operated portable shown here weighs 81/2 lbs. including batteries and charger circuit. Twenty-nine transistors. 24 diodes. and a solid-state high -voltage multiplier module are contained in this set. Input power is obtained from either a rechargeable battery pack or from an auto. boat, or other external 12 -volt source (using an optional adapter cord). Panasonic is continuing to offer 9" and 12" transistor portable models with transformer -powered chassis. A deluxe version of the basic 9" set is also available. Sony presents five transistorized. small - screen, personal portables for the coming year. All are AC -DC. capable of operation from either self-contained batteries or rechargeable battery pack. 12 -volt auto/boat systems. or from household AC. Screen sizes are 8", 7", 5" and 4". a PF REPORTER/October, 1966

11 Sarkes Tarzian, Inc., largest manufacturer of TV and FM tuners, offers unexcelled tuner overhaul and factory -supervised repair service. Completely -equipped and conveniently - located Service Centers offer fast, dependable and factory -supervised repair service on all makes and models. Centers are staffed by well - trained technicians, assisted by engineering personnel. Tarzian-made tuners received one day will be repaired and shipped out the next. More time may be required on other makes. Every channel-not just the channels existing in any given area-is checked and re -aligned per orig- 5r TUNER SERVICE CORPORATION (Factory -supervised tuner service authorized by Sarkes Tarzian) MIDWEST 817 N. Pennsylvania St. Indianapolis, Ind., Box 1642 Tel : EAST Tonnele Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Tel : SOUTH -EAST -938 Gordon St., S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Tel : final specifications. Exclusive cleaning method makes the tuner look-as well as operatelike new. Cost, including ALL labor and parts (except tubes) is only $9.50 and $15 for UV combinations. No additional charge. No hidden costs. Too, you get a full, 12 -month warranty against defective workmanship and parts failure due to normal usage. Always send TV make, chassis and Model number with faulty tuner. Check with your local distributor for Sarkes Tarzian replacement tuners, parts or repair service. Or, use the address nearest you for fast, factory -supervised repair service. WEST- SARKES TARZIAN, Inc. Tuner Service Division Magnolia Blvd., N. Hollywood, Calif. Tel : Circle 2 on literature card October, 1966/PF REPORTER 9

12 publisher Howard W. Sams general manager Donald W. Bradley editor William E. Burke managing editor James M. Moore associate editors Tnomas T. Jones J. Phipps consulting editors Joe A. Groves C. P. Oliphant research librarian Bonny Howland production manager Esther M. Rainey circulation manager Pat Osborne art directors Louis J. Bos, Jr. & Robert W. Reed photography Paul Cornelius, Jr. advertising sales offices Hugh Wallace, advertising sales manager central and midwestern Roy Henry Howard W. Sams & Co., Inc., 4300 West 62nd St., Indianapolis, Ind., eastern Gregory C. Masefield Howard W. Sams & Co., Inc., 3 West 57th St., New York 19, New York MU southwestern C. H. (Jake) Stockwell C. H. Stockwell Co., 4 16 West 64th St. Mission, Kansas, RA western Los Angeles Office G. R. (Jerry) Holtz The Maurice A. Kimball Co., Inc West Carson at., Suites Torrance, Calif., Son Francisco Office The Maurice A. Kimball Co., Inc. 580 Market St., Room 400 San Francisco 4, California EX Address all correspondence to PF REPORTER, 4300 W. 62nd Street, Indianapolis, Indiana II A HOWARD W. SAMS PUBLICATION PF Reporter the magazine of electronic servicing VOLUME 16, NO. 10 OCTOBER, 1966 CONTENTS Highlights of 1967 TV Lines J. W. Phipps 1 An 8 -page preview of the new b -w sets. Letters to the Editor 12 The Electronic Scanner 17 Recommended Equipment for Robert G. Middleton 20 Square -Wave Testing An analysis of equipment needed to check components, amplifiers, receivers, and systems. Wild Sync Stan Prentiss 24 A case discussion of a vertical sync problem provides some sound troubleshooting advice. More About TV AGC Shop Talk-A look at the control circuts used Allan F. Kinckiner 26 in tube and transistor keyed AGC. New Tube and Transistor Data 30 How to Sell TV Antennas Lon Cantor Sales and advertising techniques. Symfact: Luminance Cathode Follower Notes on Test Equipment T. T. Jones Lab report on Heath Model Oscilloscope. Electronics-New Industrial Giant Ralph M. Scott Facts and figures show the electronics industry has "come of age." Are your Shelves Booster Proof William Morey A former professional shoplifter gives some straight information on this menace to shop owners. Gated -Beam FM Communications Leo G. Sands Detectors An effective limiting and detection device that is easy to adjust. The Troubleshooter Color Countermeasures Book Review Product Report Free Catalog and Literature Service Monthly Index on Free Literature Card About the Cover 1966 by Howard W Sams & Co., Inc. PP REPORTER is a trademark of Howard W. Sams & Co., Inc. ND part of PF REPORTER may be reproduced withour written permission. No patent liability is assumed with respect to use of information herein. Acceptance of advertising does not in any manner signify the products, policies and services so advertised have been approved, endorsed or recommended by this magazine. Subscription Prices: 1 year-$5.0d, 2 years , 3 years , in the U. S. A., its possessions and Canada. All other foreign countries: 1 year , 2 years- $10.00, 3 years-$ Single copy 50e; back copies 65C Indexed in Lectrodex. Printed by the Waldemar Press Div. of Howard W. Sams & Co., Inc. Change for the sake of change alone accomplishes little in electronics. In the television industry, change means improvement and involves not only completely new designs, but also refinements to existing circuits. Our cover this month illustrates a few of the new models offered for the coming year. The 8 -page book section beginning on Page 1 of this issue gives a detailed account of what is new in black and white for PF Reporter +,s ll 111

13 risk your reputation with "just -as -good" capacitors? When you pay little or no attention to quality in tubular replacement capacitors, you leave yourself wide open for criticism of your work... you risk your reputation.. you stand to lose customers. It just doesn't pay to take a chance on capacitors with unknown or debatable performance records when it's so easy to get guaranteed dependable tubulars from your Sprague distributor! Ther&s no "maybe" with these 2 great SPRAGUE DIFILM TUBULARS! The ultimate in tubular capacitor construction. Dual dielectric... polyester film and special capacitor tissue... combines the best features of both. Impregnated with HCX, an exclusive Sprague synthetic hydrocarbon material which fills every void in the paper, every pinhole in the plastic film before it solidifies, resulting in a rock -hard capacitor section... there's no oil to leak, no wax to drip. Designed for 105 C (220 F) operation without voltage derating. SPRAGUE /.05 MFD. ±10% I óoovoc.. DIFILM BLACK BEAUTY Molded Tubular Capacitors The world's most humidity -resistant molded capacitors. Tough, protective outer case of non-flammable molded phenolic... cannot be damaged in handling or installation. Black Beauty Capacitors will withstand the hottest temperatures to be found in any TV or radio set, even in the most humid climates. MIR DIFILM ORANGE DROP Dipped Tubular Capacitors A "must" for applications where only radial -lead capacitors will fit... the perfect replacement for dipped capacitors now used in many leading TV sets. Double -dipped in rugged epoxy resin for positive protection against extreme heat and humidity. No other dipped tubular capacitor can match Sprague Orange Drops! For complete listings, get your copy of Catalog C-616 from your Sprague distributor, or write to Sprague Products Company, 105 Marshall Street, North Adams, Massachusetts WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF CAPACITORS Circle 3 on literature card SPRAGUE THE MARK OF RELIABILITY October, 1,966/PF REPORTER 11

14 THE HAPPY MATV INSTALLER Letters to the Editor He used the Wizard 300* ten years ago for his systems because it was designed to distribute both UHF and VHF signals. Now, when it's time to add UHF, all he has to do is change the antenna (or add one), and install splitters. THE UNHAPPY MATV INSTALLER Dear Editor: My brother and his family have an exchange student from Chile living with them. She would like to take a 16" Zenith portable television (Model 1605) home with her. Can you inform me of the necessary changes I will have to make for it to operate satisfactorily in Chile? B. PITTS Weidman, Michigan Television transmission in Chile is on the 525 -line system and on the same channels frequencies as in the United States. The receiver in question does not have to be modified in this' respect. However, the power lines are at 230V, 60 Hertz, and additional filtering may be required. A step-down transformer will be required, but this can be external to the receiver.-ed. Dear Editor: This is in reference to your article in the May issue, page 20, titled "Keyed AGC." In Fig. 1 A you show a semiconductor diode with its anode connected to point A (labeled Rectified Positive Voltage). In Fig. IC you show the same configuration with a vacuum tube and now call point A Rectified Negative Voltage. Something has to be wrong. If my basic theory serves me well, Figures 1 A and 1B are mislabeled, Fig. 1 A should say negative voltage and Fig. 1B should say positive voltage. JAMES DUFF Brooklyn, New York You are correct. Figs. 1 A and 113 are reversed and we apologize for the error.-ed. A He used coax systems ten years ago, and now his walls are full of high attenuation cable and pressure taps. If he wants to add UHF, changing the antenna (or the amplifier) isn't going to help him at all. TRY THE WIZARD 300 T/)., It was designed and built for UHF, VHF, FM, and Color. Write for our new bulletin and see for yourself. CHARLES ENGINEERING, INC N. KNOLL DR., LOS ANGELES, CALIF *Pat. No. 2,913,679 Circle 4,nr literinnre card 12 PF REPORTER/October, 1966 r 2 Complete Tube Testers In 1 Instrument 1. RECEIVING TUBE TESTER plus: 2. TV PICTURE TUBE TESTER SAVE MORE THAN $50! (compared to buying two separate testers) Precise's New 'GREEN LINE' Model 115 $9295 Net 1. RECEIVING TUBE TESTING Eliminates Obsolescence Problem! A unique 10 -circuit switching design allows testing of all the new type tubes that have elements with multiple pin connections-the Model 115 is the first and only obsolete -proof receiving tube tester in the speed -type class. Grid emission test provides a sensitive grid emission and gas check by the use of built-in balanced VTVM circuitry. This all-important feature provides a revealing and significant tube condition test. Basic dynamic cathode emission test is supplemented by a hot cathode shorts and leakage check. Includes all latest type sockets, plus pin straighteners. 2. TV PICTURE TUBE TESTING & REJUVENATION (B&W and COLOR) The basic picture tube test (for each gun of color picture tubes, and the single gun of B&W tubes) is picture -producing beam current (not total cathode emission which is rarely indicative of picture brightness). The beam current test checks all picture tubes for proportionate screen brightness. The critical central area of the picture tube cathode is checked in addition to the controlling action of the first grid. Rejuvenation of picture tubes is accomplished by a unique capacitor discharge circuit which welds most intermittent elements, and redistributes cathode oxide over the beam -producing central cathode area. Meter directly indicates increase in brightness after each rejuvenation "shot". GENERAL DATA Wide visibility, 2% accuracy meter includes separate scales for quality test, grid emission, and picture tube beam current. Complete up-to-date data book supplied. New data constantly available. Size 16" x 9" x 43/4". Weight 8 pounds. ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE: Model CTA Color Tube Socket Adapter, $6.50 Net. See the complete "GREEN LINE"-power supplies, scopes, VTVMs, signal generators, tube testers, decade boxes, probes-at your local distributor, or write direct for full information and specs. PRECISE ELECTRONICS of Designatronics Incorporated Division 76 East Second Street, Mineola, L.I., New York ENGINEERED EXCELLENCE IN TEST EQUIPMENT Cirrlr?,m litrra111rr ( J

15 Are you a watch watcher? If not, you should be. After all, your time is what you're selling. So when it runs short, you feel it first in the pocketbook. That's where Amphenol comes in. Our test equipment can't put more hours in your day, but it can help you handle more jobs every working hour-in the home or in the shop. Take our Color Commander, for example. It cuts color alignment time by 40%. Here's how: 1. An exclusive three -color bar test pattern means you don't have to waste time counting unnecessary color bars. You check only the three bars required for color alignment. 2. Squares, not rectangles, give instant vertical and horizontal linearity adjustments. 3. Another Amphenol exclusive: A single dot provides fast static convergence. You don't have to guess which is the center dot. 4. Single cross bar centers the raster quickly, conveniently. These are the kinds of time -saving features you can expect from Amphenol's exciting line of test equipment -including the revolutionary CRT Commander and the hand-held Signal Commander. If your time is important, you're ready for Amphenol. For a brochure on the complete Amphenol line, call your Amphenol distributor. Or write to Amphenol, Box 134, Broadview, IIlinois BE ON THE LOOKOUT... for an exciting addition tc the Amphenol line. Completely solid state, the Amphenol Color Commander is available with battery power or built-in 117 VAC. Only 37/2 lbs, it has RF and video output plus easy -to -use gun killers. M AMPHENOL Circle 6 orr literialure card October, 1966/PF REPORTER 13

16 ANNOUNCING A MAJOR ANTENNA ADVANCE from JERROLD

17 FARAIÇ'G pue, Improves Color Reception Three Ways 1. PIuS GAIN-Color carriers are detected in phase. Therefore, more directivity is needed for good color reception than for black and white. The extra high gain of the Paralog- Plus provides sharp directivity, producing excellent color pictures. 2. Plus FLATNESS-Tilt causes incorrect colors. Industry experts say that a flatness of ±2 db per channel is required for good color reception. Paralog-Plus is flat within ± 1 db per channel. 3. Plus MATCH-A poorly matched antenna shifts the phase of incoming signals, distorting color. Excellent match of Paralog-Plus prevents color -distorting phase shifts. The unique feature of the Paralog-Plus is a BI MODAL DIRECTOR system which makes the parasitic elements unusually effective. The BI MODAL parasitic elements combine two high band directors into a single director covering all low -band channels, plus the entire FM band. These directors are resonated to' overcome the natural tendency for fall -off in gain at 108 MHz and 216 MHz. Thus, the Paralog-Plus is exceptionally flat across the entire VHF television and FM bands. The Paralog-Plus driven elements work in two modes simultaneously: (1) 1/2 wavelength for low -band channels, and (2) 3/2 wavelength for high -band channels. Thus, each element in the Paralog-Plus serves double duty. In the Paralog-Plus, more of the elements work to bring in any given channel. The result is an "ungimmicked" antenna that is unusually compact. An antenna that returns to the basic periodic principle and gives it new direction. Test the Paralog-Plus against any antennas comparable in size and price. You'll be surprised at the difference. Plus CHOICE OF 300 AND 75 OHM OUTPUTS The Paralog-Plus includes both 300 and 75 ohm outputs, for match to either twinlead or coax. FM RECEPTION Like color TV, FM stereo requires an especially strong, clean signal. Every Paralog-Plus model provides full, flat gain over the entire FM band. Plus THESE QUALITY MECHANICAL FEATURES SELF-CLEANING WEDGE -SNAP LOCKS- ELIMINATE DIPOLE JUNCTION NOISE The wedge -snap lock actually tightens and improves with vibration. The spring pressure of the clamp jams the wedge aperture over the squared dipole's end. Since it cannot seat all the way down, a sharp pressure is maintained on the edges of the dipole. Vibration merely tightens the pressure, jamming the wedge into the dipole so that it is both self-cleaning and self -tightening. CYCOLAC INSULATORS Tough enough to be used for timber -splitting wedges and golf club heads. Eliminates cumbersome cross feed points. Makes each insulating mount a strong point. And 4 -inch separation of feed lines eliminates shorting due to icing or salt build-up. Phis Golden armor coating Dual square boom construction (Models 135, 165 and 225). Entire antenna array goes up in one piece. Mounting brackets positioned for perfect balance. Grounded transmission lines. New Paralog-Plus antenna from Jerrold... created by the same engineering and the same plant that produces America's greatest satellite -tracking and telemetry antennas. For complete details on this profitable new line see your Jerrold distributor or sales rep, or write: JER RO LO DISTRIBUTOR SALES DIVISION 401 Walnut St, Philadelphia, Pa Circle 7 on literature card

18 New design for color... and all other! QUICK -CHECKS MORE COLOR TV TUBES WITH Gm* ACCURACY NEWB&K "rmakes test under actual set-operating conditions model 707 DYNAMIC MUTUAL CONDUCTANCE TUBE TESTER with obsolescence protection Tests: New and old TV and Radio Tubes. Tests Nuvistors, Novars, 10 -pin tubes, 12 -pin Compactrons, European Hi-Fi tubes, Voltage Regulators, and Most Industrial types. You're always ahead with B&K. The new "707" gives you the famous B&K professional tube -testing speed and efficiency-plus the ability to test more color TV tubes with Gm* accuracy. Provides multiple -socket section to quick -check most of the TV and radio tube types the true dynamic mutual conductance way*-plus simplified switch section to check other tube types in Dyna-Jet emission circuit. Also includes provision for future new sockets. You can quickly check all the tubes in the set, detect hard -to -locate weak tubes that need replacement... sell more tubes, save call-backs, and make more profit. Makes test under set -operating conditions. Checks each section of multi -section tubes separately. Checks for all shorts, grid emission, leakage, and gas. Makes quick "life" test. Exclusive adjustable grid emission test provides sensitivity to over 100 megohms. Quickly pays for itself. Net, $18995 See your B&K Distributor or Write for Catalog AP22-R NEW TUBE INFORMATION SERVICE Keep your tube tester up-to-date. Subscribe now to tube information service, available every 3 months. B & K MANUFACTURING CO. DIVISION OF DYNASCAN CORPORATION 1801 W. BELLE PLAINE AVE.CHICAGO, ILL Export: Empire Exporters, 123 Grand St., New York 13, U.S.A. 16 PF REPORTER/October, 1966 Circle 8 on literature card

19 The Electronic Scanner news of the servicing industry Experience for Sa/e SALUTE TO SARNOFF Three national organizations - the EIA, the IEEE, and the NAB - co -sponsored the "Salute to David Sarnoff." It was held in the Grand ballroom of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, in New York, on September 30, the exact day sixty years ago when General Sarnoff started working for a telegraph company. In a joint statement announcing plans for the dinner, the presidents of the sponsoring organizations said that the event was being held to commemorate General Sarnoff's "outstanding contributions to the progress and welfare of his industry, his country, and his fellow men. No man has placed his stamp of genius more firmly upon an era than General Sarnoff." This is the first time, it was pointed out, that these three associations have ever united in such a tribute. General Sarnoff, who earlier this year celebrated his 75th birthday, came to this country in 1900 at the age of nine. He sold newspapers and worked as a delivery and messenger boy. On September 30, 1906, he joined the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company of America as an office boy and began his career in wireless. When the Radio Corporation of America was formed, in 1919, he became its Commercial Manager. General Sarnoff was elected President of RCA in 1930, at the age of 39. In 1947, he was elected Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer. In 1966, he relinquished the post of Chief Executive Officer, continuing to serve actively as Chairman of the Board. A memorandum he wrote to his superior officer at Marconi in 1916 has become famous in the annals of American industry. In it, he proposed a plan for broadcasting programs into the home by using a "radio music box." This proposal led directly to the development of the radio and radio broadcasting as it is known today. General Sarnoff likewise was the moving force behind the development of both black -and -white and all -electronic, compatible color television. In 1944, the Television Broadcasters Association conferred upon him the title "Father of American Television." In addition to his scientific and industrial activities, General Sarnoff has achieved wide recognition for his efforts in military communications, especially during World War II. He served as Special Consultant on Communications at SHAEF Headquarters in Europe, and was elevated to the rank of Brigadier General on December 6, MERGERS From Dynascan Corporation comes good news for the servicemen who have been unable to obtain replacement parts for test instruments made by Precision Apparatus. Dynascan has acquired the inventory of Precision, Paco, and Precision -Paco divisions of Precision Apparatus. The address is: Precision Apparatus Division Dynascan Corporation 1801 W. Belle Plaine Ave. Chicago, Illinois Oak Electro/Netics Corp. acquired the business and Sure seems we started something! Yes; over ten years ago, when we started overhauling tuners (all makés and models), we set a price of $9.95 for this service. Apparently there are those who would like to imitate our achievement-and for 45 less. Maybe the special skills, special equipment and downright 'old fashioned experience we built up during these past years are worth that little extra.-you be the judge. Remember; 45 buys you more than a quarter of a million man/hours of experience, plus true devotion to our business our only business... overhauling... your television tuners the best way we know how. And in over ten years we sure know how! Castle - The Pioneer of TV tuner overhauling Not the cheapest - just the best. For complete tuner overhaul we still charge only $9.95. This includes all labor and parts; except tubes and transistors, which are charged extra at low net prices. Simply send us the defective tuner complete; include tubes, 1 shield cover and any damaged parts with model number and complaint. Your tuner will be expertly overhauled and returned promptly, performance restored, aligned to original standards and warranted for 90 days. UV combination tuner must be single chassis type; dismantle tandem UHF and VHF tuners and send in the defective unit only. Exact Replacements are available for tuners unfit for overhaul. As low as $12.95 exchange. (Replacements are new or rebuilt.) CASTLE TV TUNER SERVICE, INC. MAIN PLANT: 5701 N. Western Ave., Chicago 45, Illinois EAST: Vernon Blvd., Long Island City 1, N.Y. CANADA: 136 Main Street, Toronto 13, Ontario *Major Parts are additional in Canada Circle 9 on literature curd October, 1966/PF REPORTER 17

20 FUSEHOLDERS For BUSS FUSES Panel mounted, in -the -line, lamp indicating, signal activating, visual indicating-with solder terminals or quick -connect terminals-for fuses from 1/4 x 5/8 inches and larger. Fuseholders to meet Commercial and Military specifications. Write for BUSS Bulletin SFB. INSIST ON circuit TV, master antenna TV, educational TV and community antenna equipment. Corning Glass Works has announced it will build a plant at State College, Pa., to manufacture glass for color television tubes. Increased capacity is needed because of the rapid growth of television industry requirements, and Corning will continue to make television bulbs at its other television plants at Albion, Mich., Bluffton, Ind., and Corning, N. Y. It was also announced that Corning Glass Works of Canada Ltd. will construct a plant at Bracebridge, Ont., which initially will manufacture glass for television tubes for the Canadian market. POTPOURI Admiral Corporation has received a contract from several NATO countries for a quantity of new low light -level television cameras developed by the company's government electronics division. The new system will aid the detection of airborne targets when they are surrounded by waves, mountains, rugged terrain and other radar reflective material known to the military as "clutter". The Admiral low light TV camea, incorporating the same type of pick-up tube used by television networks in studio cameras, can be utilized as a reinforced kind of detection system because it can track low -flying aircraft. It is capable of operating under all daytime and nighttime conditions. The compilation of the first six months of returns to the 1966 continuous year -long survey by the National Fed- BUSSMANN MFG. DIVISION, McGraw Edison Co., St. Louis, Mo USS : The Complete Line of Fuses and assets of Phillips -Advance Control Co., the relay division of Phillips -Eckardt Electronic Corporation, for $1.8 million in cash. Phillips -Advance, and its subsidiary, Phillips Control Corp. of Puerto Rico, which was also acquired by O/E/N in the transaction, produce a broad line of relays for the electronics and communications industries. The formation of a new company, RCA Colour Tubes Limited, to manufacture RCA color television picture tubes in England for the British and export markets, was announced jointly by the Radio Corporation of America and Radio Rentals Limited. The company's initial product line will include 25 -inch and 19 -inch rectangular color television picture tubes similar to those now manufactured in quantity by RCA in the United States. It was emphasized that the output of RCA Colour Tubes Limited is intended primarily for the British market, although it is expected that some of the tubes will be exported. It was also pointed out that the tubes will operate equally well with the color television system to be used in the United Kingdom and any system that has been proposed for use in Europe or elsewhere. EXPANSIONS Blonder -Tongue Laboratories, Inc., has launched production in a new 36,000 -square -foot plant, its sixth in Newark, N.J. The new manufacturing facility is being devoted to the production of selected items from the company's various lines-distributor products, laboratory instruments, closed- 18 PF REPORTER/October, 1966 TRON SUB -MINIATURE PIGTAIL FUSES BODY SIZE ONLY.145 x.300 INCHES VISUAL INDICATING For use on miniaturized devices, or on gigantic space tight multi -circuit electronic devices. Glass tube construction permits visual inspection of element. Smallest fuses available with wide ampere range. Twenty-three ampere sizes from 1/100 thru 15 amps. Hermetically sealed for potting without danger of sealing material affecting operation. Extremely high resistance to shock or vibration. Operate without exterior venting. Tell us what you need or... INSIST ON Write for Buss Bulletin SFB BUSSMANN MFG. DIVISION McGraw -Edison Co., St. Louis, Mo Circle 10 on literature card

21 CCz3, Z -4$Z) "Quick -Acting" fuses for protection of sensitive instruments or delicate apparatus;-or normal acting fuses for protection where circuit is not subject to current transients or surges. INSIST ON quick -acting BUSSMANN MFG. DIVISION, McGraw -Edison Co., ST. LOUIS, MO Interconnected on a printed ceramic substrate on which resistors have been screened. The new IF amplifier has an overall gain of 55 db with a maximum output level swing of 1 volt rms. The unit operates from +10 volts and -4 volts with a total current drain of 6mA. The Zenith Radio Corporation filed additional technical data on its subscription TV system in response to a request issued by the Federal Communications Commission. The document filed gives full details on its Phonevision system and describes a new decoder engineered for color as well as black -and-white subscription telecasts. The new Phonevision decoder contains a TV tuner that can accommodate any VHF or UHF channel, and is quickly installed by shifting the subscriber's antenna connection from receiver to decoder and then attaching the decoder output wires to the TV set's antenna terminals. When the subscriber wishes to watch a program, he turns his decoder to the proper program code as shown in a special program guide, then inserts a ticket in the decoder. This connects the decoder to the TV receiver and also drives a series of pins through the ticket in a pattern dictated by the program's code number. The sound and picture are then unscrambled for the duration of the program. Shortly before the end of the current month or validity period, the subscriber is sent his next ticket and a selfaddressed envelope for returning the used ticket to the subscription TV company. The ticket is processed through a computer, which provides a bill to be mailed to the subscriber. Please turn to page 89 Fuseholders of Unquestioned High Quality la,24aera,. eration of Independent Business shows that since last year 37% of the firms have expanded, with an average investment per expanding firm of $22,764. However, new job creation by the independent firms appears to be slightly lower than the previous year. In another national survey by NFIB, 35% of the independent businessmen report difficulties with collections, up from 31% at the end of the first half of the year. In some states though, business has apparently been tightening upon credit and been more active in collecting overdue accounts. Many states show substantial reductions in firms with collection problems. Further computerized checking indicates that the big rise in collection problems started in June, coinciding with the time that the new income tax withholding schedules went into effect. One of the newest integrated circuit developments from the Sprague Electric Research and Development Center was revealed for the first time at the opening of the WESCON show. A complete 455 khz amplifier on a ceramic plate only 1" wide by 1' " long was achieved by using a combination of thick -film, thin-film, and diffused microcircuit technology in combination with discrete capacitive elements. No transformers or external components are required. The 455 khz intermediate frequency amplifier consists of two tuned IF stages and an AGC circuit. It has a Q of 55, and the center frequency of 455 khz has a stability of ±0.5%. The active electronics and frequency -determining components are provided by monolithic microcircuits. FUSETRON dual -element Fuses slow blowing "Slow blowing" fuses prevent needless outages by not opening on harmless overloadsyet provide safe, protection against shortcircuits or dangerous overloads. INSIST ON BUSSMANN MFG. DIVISION, McGraw -Edison Co., ST. LOUIS, MO. E3107 Circle 10 on literature card October, 1966/PF REPORTER 19

22 Recommended Equipment for UMMei SCUARE WAVE TE TI G by Robert G. Middleton Equipment recommendations for square -wave testing depend upon the job that you wish to accomplish. For example, the equipment needed 100 i 90 L u x `A 40 LL 0 30 C.) (A) Circuit. UNIVERSAL RC TIME -CONSTANT CHART -(a) -(b) Fig. 1. to make square -wave tests of integrating circuits is much less elaborate (and much less expensive) than the equipment needed to make TIME IN RC UNITS -- (B) l 1eforms. Simple integrator. 5 some of the key tests that concern the technician, and note the square - Again, the equipment required for the same test of video amplifiers. tests of video amplifiers is much less elaborate (and far less costly) than the equipment needed for tests of snap -recovery diodes. Within each category of test requirements, there is an area of personal choice. For example, we can make square -wave tests of integrating circuits with a calibrated or uncalibrated scope. But if we use an uncalibrated scope, we must follow up our square -wave test with a signal -generator check of the time -base speed in the scope. This takes more time than if we use a scope that is calibrated. In general, we use square -wave tests to make streamlined analyses of components, circuits, stages, amplifiers, receivers, and systems. Therefore, if we employ square -wave equipment that requires an excessive number of auxiliary procedures and measurements, we are defeating the primary intent of the test method. It is good practice to utilize square - wave equipment that is fully adapted to the job. By the same token, it is wasteful to use unnecessarily elaborate and expensive equipment to make simple and undemanding tests. Accordingly, we will summarize 20 PF REPORTER/October, 1966

23 tli wave equipment that is fully adapted to each category of test. Integrator Circuits Among the various circuits and units encountered in routine troubleshooting work, integrators make minimum demands upon square - wave equipment. This fact results from the very limited frequency response of conventional integrators. In turn, the rise of the output waveform from an integrator is quite slow. This response places only a limited demand on the rise time of the square -wave generator. It also places only a limited demand on the rise time of the scope. Since we evaluate an integrator unit on the basis of rise time, it is very helpful to employ a scope that has a calibrated time base. Fig. I A shows the simplest form of integrating circuit. We are chiefly interested in the output voltage waveform (a) in Fig. 1B. Waveform (b) is the circuit current-the voltage waveform across the resistor.* This integrator was used in some early TV receivers, but has been supplanted by more complex circuits. Nevertheless, it serves as an instructive introductory example. The time constant of the integrator is approximately 0.5 millisecond, which means that it can be tested satisfactorily with a square -wave generator and scope that have comparatively slow rise times. We must not suppose, however, that there are no other requirements. An integrator operates in a TV receiver at a 60 -Hz repetition rate, so our basic test is a 60 -Hz square - wave test. The square -wave generator should supply a flat-topped 60 - Hz square wave, and the scope should reproduce a flat-topped 60 - Hz square wave. Most instruments meet this requirement, but there are exceptions. Therefore, it is advisable to check the generator and scope, as depicted in Fig. 2. Although a small amount of tilt, such as 5% or 10%, can be tolerated in practical work, a large degree of tilt in a 60 -Hz square wave is unsatisfactory; the output waveform shown in Fig. 1B will be distorted objectionably. *Derivation of the universal time -constant chart is explained in the Oct., 1965 issue of PF REPORTER. Note that the tilt distortion seen in Fig. 2B can be caused by the square -wave generator, by the scope, or by a combination of tilt in both instruments. A DC scope is best, because it will introduce no tilt even at very low square -wave frequencies. An AC scope is satisfactory for integrator tests if it does not impose more than a small percentage of tilt in a 60 -Hz square wave. Some square -wave generators have DC -coupled output circuits, and these generators will introduce no tilt, even at very low square -wave frequencies. A generator with an AC -coupled output circuit is adequate if it does not produce more than a small percentage of tilt in a 60 -Hz square wave. Time -Base Calibration Service -type scopes that have good 60 -Hz square -wave response nevertheless have uncalibrated time bases. This means that you cannot evaluate a waveform from the universal time -constant chart in Fig. 1B until the sweep speed has been checked. If you have an accurate audio signal generator, it is quite practical to check the sweep speed, although this does entail an additional step in the test. Most modern scopes are provided wtih a graticule that is ruled with lines spaced at uniform intervals. The horizontal intervals are used when we calibrate the sweep speed. Beginners may suppose that the time base is calibrated in a service - type scope, because the sweep -range control is marked in frequency steps. However, from the standpoint of measuring rise time, the scope is un - calibrated. First, the various frequency steps serve only as a rough guide-the indicated values are not held to a tight tolerance. Secondly, the sweep -vernier control is completely uncalibrated, so we have only a rough idea of the sweep speed if we rely on the control indication. Therefore, we must make a sweep -speed calibration as illustrated in Fig. 3. The audio generator is set to a frequency f at which the displayed sine wave occupies a chosen horizontal interval, such as from zero to Tï in Fig. 3. Then, the sweep speed is given by 1/f. For example suppose that the audio gener- LOW-C PROBE =-- SQUARE- WAVE SCOPE GEN. _ov 0 ` og o (A) Equipment set-up. (B) 60Hz square -wave with excessive tilt. Fig. 2. Checking equipment for tilt. ator is set to a frequency of 1 khz. Then, the time from zero to T., in Fig. 3B is equal to 1 millisecond. The time from zero to T, is equal to 0.5 millisecond. As long as we do not change the sweep -control settings on the scope, we know that each horizontal interval on the grati - cule represents 0.5 millisecond. Note that it is not necessary to use triggered sweep in order to have a calibrated time base. We can use a scope with free -running sweep. However, after a scope with free - running sweep has been calibrated for sweep speed, we cannot touch any of the horizontal controls; this includes the sync control. Any variation of controls in the horizontal - sweep will upset the time -base calibration. Therefore, we can save a considerable time by using a scope FREQUENCY f (A) Equipment set-up. (B) 0 to T2 equals 1/f. Fig. 3. Calibrating the time base. October, 1966/PF REPORTER 21

24 Fig. 4. Moderately -priced lab scope. with triggered sweep and a calibrated time base-with this type of scope, any of the horizontal -sweep controls can be reset at any time, and we merely read the sweep speed directly from the settings of the time -base controls. Note Fig. 4. This is a utility -type lab scope with triggered sweep and calibrated time base. Since the sweep is triggered, the sweep speed is not affected by the setting of the sync - amplitude control. Calibration of the time base is held to a tight tolerance, so that the sweep speed is indicated accurately at any setting. Therefore, we dispense with the calibration procedure shown in Fig. 3 when using a lab -type scope. Since the vertical amplifier of the scope is flat to 5 MHz, color waveforms can be evaluated in detail. Unless we use triggered sweep, waveform detail cannot be expanded-fig. 5 shows how a portion of a color -bar signal can be expanded with a wide -band triggered -sweep scope. Intermediate Scopes In between the service -type scopes and the utility -type lab scopes, we find the scope that provides trig - IN IT1i 17711" H Ijl'IIII!PI IIIIIÌIIII1il 1 I=l,` 'Ii1lWll! III Illltï lliz. Fig. 5. Expansion of color -bar signal shows 3.58 MHz sine wave. 22 PF REPORTER/October, 1966 gered sweeps with an uncalibrated time base. An intermediate scope permits expansion of waveform detail. However, rise times cannot be measured unless the scope is calibrated in a separate procedure. Note that it is not difficult to provide a simple version of triggered sweep in a service -type scope. This modification was discussed in the March 1966 issue of PF REPORTER. The principle of the modification is to provide an adjustable cutoff bias for the sweep oscillator. Horizontal deflection is initiated by the arrival of the leading edge of an input signal. The intermediate scope provides a choice of free -running, triggered, or magnified sweep. When set to the free -running mode, the sawtooth oscillator operates as in a conventional service -type scope. In the triggered mode of operation, a potentiometer provides an adjustable cutoff bias on the horizontal sweep oscillator. Consequently, there is no horizontal beam deflection until the leading edge of an input signal arrives. The beam then makes one horizontal excursion; another excursion cannot occur until the next leading edge arrives to bring the sweep oscillator out of cutoff. The sweep speed is unaffected by the setting of the sync - amplitude control; nevertheless, the exact sweep speed is unknown in this type of scope unless a calibration is made as illustrated in Fig. 4. Sweep magnification employs free - running sweep, and is useful for expansion of waveform detail in the same general way as with triggered sweep. As before, the sweep speed is unknown unless separate calibration is made. Sweep magnification is accomplished by greatly overdriving the horizontal -amplifier tubes so that only a portion of the incoming waveform is displayed horizontally. The desired portion to be expanded is chosen by adjusting the grid -cathode bias for the horizontal amplifier. Sweep Triggering Now let us consider a further requirement in the square -wave testing of RC circuits. If we connect the scope across R in Fig. 1, the circuit is being operated as a differentiating circuit, and the waveform has a very fast rise, as shown in Fig. 1B. In some applications, we may be con- cerned merely with the decay interval of the differentiated square wave -in such case, we do not make a rise -time measurement. On the other hand, there are numerous applications in which we are chiefly concerned with the rise time of the differentiated square wave. This measurement requires a square -wave generator that supplies a fast -rise square wave and a scope that can display the fast rise. In order for the scope to display the rise of the differentiated square wave, horizontal deflection must start at the beginning of the leading edge, as depicted in Fig. 6. This entails the basic problem of triggering the sweep slightly before the waveform starts to rise. Any sweep oscillator requires a small amount of time to respond to a trigger voltage. Therefore, if a sweep system were used such as in the intermediate scopes, more or less of the leading edge in Fig. 6 would be "lost" and could not be displayed on the scope screen, and a rise -time measurement becomes impossible to make. This problem is overcome in scopes such as illustrated in Fig. 4, by means of a delay line which is connected in series with the vertical amplifier. The delay line "holds" the input signal for a short period of time, while the trigger pulse gets the horizontal sweep system started. Horizontal deflection will have started by the time the signal arrives at the vertical deflecting plates of the Tp INPUT PULSE WAVEFORM EXPANDED LEADING EDGE SCOPE SCREEN Fig. 6. Sweep must start at the beginning of the pulse.

25 VERTICAL DELAY VERTICAL o --- ATTENUATOR LINE AMPLIFIER TRIGGER AMPLIFIER HORIZONTAL SWEEP SYSTEM Fig. 7. Delay line permits early triggering of sweep. CRT, and all of the leading edge in the waveform is displayed. Fig. 7 shows the plan of a triggered -sweep scope with a delay line. Delay lines for triggered -sweep scopes are elaborate, compared with those used in color -TV receivers. The delay is comparatively short, but many sections are used in a scope delay line to avoid distortion of the waveform. A typical scope delay line employs 40 LC sections, connected in cascade (see Fig. 8). This is a low-pass filter configuration, with a cutoff frequency higher than that of the vertical amplifier. Because many sections are used, the response is very uniform and there is no observable phase shift. Scope delay lines typically have an elapsed time of 0.25 microsecond from input to output. This short delay suffices for the horizontal sweep system to start operating before the signal arrives at the vertical deflection plates of the CRT. Hold -Off or Lockout Circuit When the leading edge of a waveform is greatly expanded, as shown in Fig. 6, the sweep oscillator completes its operating cycle before the applied waveform has decayed to zero. Thus, the expanded leading edge represents a complete sweep cycle which is followed by the decay interval of the pulse. The decay voltage can also trigger the sweep oscillator and will produce a confusing overlapped pattern unless the decay Fig. 8. interval is locked out. This is the function of the hold -off or lockout circuit which is provided in most triggered -sweep scopes. Lockout is automatic, and functions as follows: When the leading edge of the incoming signal produces an output voltage from the trigger amplifier, the lockout circuit is simultaneously energized. It feeds back a cutoff bias to the trigger amplifier so that no signal can pass for a certain interval. The trigger pulse has been applied to the horizontal sweep system, but the trigger amplifier is immediately disabled so that another trigger pulse cannot be produced until the lockout bias has decayed to zero. Thus, false triggering and overlapping patterns are avoided, no matter what type of waveform may be fed into the vertical amplifier. CRT Unblanking The more elaborate triggered - sweep scopes also have a CRT un - blanking circuit. This is necessary to avoid screen burns. Observe Fig. 9. The leading edge of the square wave rises so fast that it is invisible. If we should advance the intensity control sufficiently to make the leading edge visible, the flat tops would become excessively bright (because the beam is moving slowly), and the CRT screen would be burned. When the leading edge of a fast -rise waveform is expanded, as in Fig. 6, the pattern is invisible until we advance the intensity control sufficiently. Basic delay -line circuit. Fig. 9. Leading edge is invisible. This requirement involves the problem of the beam "spot" in between successive sweeps. The spot remains motionless at the left-hand side of the screen after the leading edge is completed, and until the next trigger pulse is produced. Therefore, display of the resting spot cannot bè permitted-it would immediately burn a hole in the screen. The CRT unblanking circuit prevents any screen display until the horizontal sweep system starts to operate; the CRT beam is then unblanked for the duration of the forward sweep. As soon as the forward sweep is completed, the CRT beam is again blanked. Thus, in the absence of an input signal, the screen of a triggered -sweep scope remains completely dark. Conclusion In this article, we have observed some introductory facts concerning recommended equipment for square - wave testing. Integrator circuits make minimum demands on square - wave generators and scopes. This is shown by the universal RC time - constant chart which depicts the slow rise. Nevertheless, although a narrow -band scope is adequate, it is helpful to employ calibrated sweeps. By way of comparison, differentiating circuits make maximum demands on square -wave generators and scopes, if we are concerned with the rise time of the output waveform. This requirement can be met only by fast -rise square - wave generators, and triggered - sweep scopes with lockout and beam-unblanking functions. All such scopes have calibrated time bases. If a narrow -band scope is used in this type of test, the output waveform will be highly distorted. Its rise will indicate the rise time of the scope-not of the circuit. October, 1966/PF REPORTER 23

26 *Al SYNC by Stan Prentiss Do you believe that horizontal and vertical sync problems must continue to plague the novice and amuse the pros? Or do you suppose there's a straightforward way to solve any sync difficulty just by ogling the schematic and testing once or twice with an oscilloscope probe? The following case discussion should help you answer these questions. Circuit Operation The circuit of Fig. 1 is a vertical multivibrator and vertical -output tube combined, with RC coupling from the output back to the input for positive feedback. The vertical sync pulses, previously separated, are amplified by the sync amplifier. VERT 5 SYNC AMP 2 SYNC 3 SEP HORIZ AFC Al2AU7 82 DI 35V integrated by R85 and C81, and coupled to the grid of the vertical multivibrator through C82, R90, and C83. A DC control bias is generated through R5 (the vertical -hold control) and R4 (the vertical linearity control) whose No. 1 terminal approaches ground through R97. Normally, with no signal applied, the DC voltage measured at the grid of V 14B is -46 volts. The tube is then completely cut off. In the absence of trigger pulses, conduction is accomplished by the large positive AC spikes (from the vertical - output tube) that constitute both the vertical sweep and multivibrator free -running trigger. Since AC cannot be measured on a DC meter, there is no way to detect their pres- 22K.015 VERT MULI Al2AU K.0039.B082 VERT. HOLD CONTROL l.5 MEG 6V V 5 HEIGHT CONTROL 3.5 MEG I 27 22K 33K DO NOT T3 BLUE 5 MEASURE J420O -20v6 2 s5v B_ óg RN x S 159 DEFLECTION II I R96 470K = YOKE K 1 RED rt, 8 R' K RB 27 BOOST+ 500V 90K I VERT INEARITY 12K 7S t 255V CONTROL 2.5 MEG/1 Fig. 1. Vertical section of RCA Chassis KCS84F. VERT MULL VERT OUTPUT 6A05 90K 39 ente without an oscilloscope unless the raster can be viewed. The positive transitions are rapid and must overcome the negative bias and allow the tube to conduct and produce positive drive pulses for the output. Scope to the Rescue In this instance, both free -running and sync triggers were present, but there was not a full raster. The weak cathode ray tube vaguely showed that the bottom portion of the picture was cut off and the top elongated. An oscilloscope, with low capacitance probe, showed the incoming trigger pulse "sitting" at 100 volts DC, at an amplitude of 70 volts peak -to -peak (Fig. 2 ). The vertcial multivibrator output, however, was only 85 volts DC at 100 volts peak -to -peak (Fig. 3), indicating that the tube was operating at almost 100 volts DC less than normal with a resultant shortening of the multivibrator waveform. Rotating the 3.5-megohm height control filled the picture at the bottom, but left the top stretched out of proportion. A quick check of the boost voltage supply showed a full 500 volts on the bottom side of R121, the 270K dropping resistor. So I knew there was enough plate voltage available for the multivibrator if I could just get it there. The waveform of the multivibrator did, however, indicate one other prime aspect. Note that some of the vertical output pulse widths (Fig. 3) are shorter or longer than others. A check on the vertical circuit side of R85 revealed that the vertical oscillator was out of sync (Fig. 4). Adjusting the vertical -hold control 24 PF REPORTER/October, 1966

27 Fig. 2. Scoped vertical sync trigger. knob would not align a symmetrical number of positive pulses with the same number of negative pulses. Even adjusting the linearity control produced no more than a shift in frequency. Thus the weak CRT had failed to show a multiple increase in the vertical frequency, which varied with the setting of the vertical -hold control. The negative pulses, of course, are the actual vertical oscillator frequency spikes from the feedback network, while the positive spikes are the incoming sync pulses as amplified and integrated. The two sets of pulses must coincide to produce vertical sync lock. My Problem This, indeed, was a problem. Several years ago, I had replaced most of the paper capacitors in this circuit with Mylar and paper units to prevent leakage and changes in filter, divider, and sawtooth forming capacitors C84, C85, and C86. I also replaced C90 to prevent any positive DC leakage to the grid of the vertical -output tube. Such leakage would cause the grid to be driven positive, producing insufficient peak plate current, which in turn would result in a white foldover at the bottom of the raster. G i 41 f 4-! t. Fig. 3. Abnormal vertical -output pulse. A quick check of R92, R89. R93, and R94 showed no changes in value. Replacing capacitor C83 had no effect. Therefore, my trouble had to be either in the triggering pulses or in the potentiometer controls. As far as I could tell, all pertinent drive pulses were well shaped and of sufficient amplitude. This left only the potentiometers as the possible source of trouble. Disconnecting all leads from the 2.5-megohm vertical linearity control, I found it had increased in value to more than 3 megohms. Doing the same to the vertical -hold control, I found, to my amazement, that this control had decreased in value from 1.5 megohms to 90K. The Causé Normally these controls change little with the small amounts of current generated by excitation bias. The only explanation I can offer is that at one time the vertical multi - vibrator tube must have shorted, causing a partial change in the characteristics of both 125 and R4, but in opposite directions. There would be, of course, almost twice the current through R5 as through R4 because of the different resistances. Usually, a quick increase in current will cause a carbon resistor to decrease in value, while a slow excess current will increase the value of the carbon toward an open. That's why discolored banding on any composition resistor should always be investigated. By the same reasoning, any sign of leakage of electrolyte from a filter capacitor demands a quick check with a capacitance checker to be sure the filter does not have an unusually large power factor, or is not partially or completely open. The Cure Both potentiometers were replaced, and the vertical multivibrator-output waveform returned to normal, as shown in Fig. 5 (inverted and "hanging" at almost 200 volts, with an amplitude of nearly 200 volts p -p). The sync functioned normally (waveform repetitions equal), and sufficient AC was developed to drive the vertical -output amplifier adequately. Fig. 4. Vertical oscillator out of sync. Conclusion The input time constants of C83 and R5 govern the timing of the vertical multivibrator, which consists of both the oscillator and output tubes-one conducting during trace time and the other conducting during retrace time. An increase in RC value will lower the oscillator frequency and make the picture roll up. A decrease in the value of RC (the trouble in the previous discussion) causes the picture to roll down. In the case just mentioned, the bottom of the picture was superimposed on the top and the scanning lines were spread too far apart. How useful was the oscilloscope? Would a DC meter have told the whole story? Hardly! In this case, the use of a DC oscilloscope gave both DC levels and AC amplitudes at the same time, cutting the troubleshooting time in half by allowing both waveforms to be viewed simultaneously. There is also another good point to remember: Always troubleshoot television receivers with a signal applied. I have never seen a piece of signal -sensitive, electronic equipment that would operate by quiescent voltages alone. Fig. 5. Normal vertical -output pulses. October, 1066/PF REPORTER 25

28 's 1 /1P''''\1GMV 581; 14. móré 20 ábout INCLUDING TRA T oo\,ljo T by Allen F Kinckiner Previous Shop Talk articles about Keyed AGC made little mention of AGC sensitivity control circuits, even though such circuits were included in the article's schematics. The more common types of AGC sensitivity control circuits are presented in Figs. I A and 1B. In virtually every receiver having an AGC control, the circuit will be a variation of one of these. Moreover, even through Figs. 1 A and 1B differ considerably, the control functions are identical; they set the static bias level of the AGC tube. The dynamic bias, which varies with the strength of the received signal, produces AGC voltage in proportion to the strength of the signal. In Fig. 1A, the Magnavox T-904 circuit, AGC sensitivity is controlled by varying cathode voltage of the AGC tube. In Fig. 1B, the Admiral D-61 circuit, the AGC tube's cathode voltage is fixed and its sensitivity is controlled by varying the G-1 voltage. An entirely different approach to obtain correct AGC voltages is used in some Westinghouse receivers (Fig. 2). Here, instead of varying the AGC tube's sensitivity, the amplitude of the keying pulse is varied. This keying pulse, taken from the junction of capacity voltage divider C-60 and C-61, is supplied from a tap on the horizontal output transformer. With C-60 at minimum capacity, high keying pulse amplitudes are applied to the keyer's plate, and high levels of AGC voltage will be obtained. With C-60 at maximum capacity lesser values of AGC voltage will be obtained. Knowledge of this circuit led to correcting a "tough dog" AGC trouble encountered in a receiver that did not have any type of AGC control circuit. The receiver involved was a 'deal- ers stock' Philco 16J27 chassis with the circuit shown in Fig. 3. When the receiver was turned on it played faultlessly for as long as it remained tuned to the same channel. However, if channels were changed after initial warm-up, a picture similar to Fig. 4 resulted. The same condition could be induced by momentarily grounding the control grid of the first video IF tube. Substituting a complete set of new tubes only proved that tubes were not the trouble. Varying the noise inverter control had no effect, and led to the suspicion that the noise inverter stage was causing sync lockout. This might also account for the AGC malfunctioning and the negative picture condition. Therefore every component and voltage in the V -3b circuit (Fig. 3), was checked and double checked. The only abnormality found was that the grid of V -3b remained at minus 7 volts regardless of the setting of R-7. By shunting R-49 with a 3.9 meg resistor the grid voltage could be varied from minus 7 to minus 9.5 VID AMP PLATE AGC TO IF & RF KEY PULSES n n KEY PULSES Fig. 1. Sensitivity of keyed AGC stage is controlled by either of these circuits in many designs Fig. 2. Westinghouse controls levels of AGC voltage developed by varying amplitude of keying pulses via variable capacitor C PF REPORTER/October, 1966

29 RF AGC Fig. 3. Decreasing capacity of C-7 to 820 pf volts. At the higher value the trouble was far less severe; the negative picture did not occur, although syncing took about twenty seconds each time channels were changed or the signal was interrupted. Earlier tests had shown that a high minus voltage, suggesting IF oscillation, existed on G-1 of the first video IF during the negative picture, out of sync condition. Now every component in the AGC circuit was critically checked and found to be right up to par. The large capacity of C-7 from plate to ground of the AGC tube did not seem correct. When an 820 pf. unit was substituted for C-7 the trouble was cured entirely. Now when channels were changed pix overload never occured and sync lock -in was immediate. Since C-7 is one element of a capacity voltage divider, decreasing its value slightly increased the keying pulse amplitude and produced better AGC action. Transistorized Keyed AGC There are a few similarities but also many differences between Keyed AGC in transistor TV receivers and Keyed AGC in tube receivers. One similarity does stand out; in either type, control of the AGC stage is obtained from voltage shift in a video amplifier load. When the voltage shift is obtained from a transistor collecter load, operation is quite like plate load voltage shift in tube receivers. However, in transistor receivers it is also possible to use the signal induced voltage shift in the emitter load of a video amplifier. A comparative circuit in tube sets cured trouble in Philco. would be the use of voltage shift in a video amplifier cathode resistor. The variety of designs in transistor receivers is great because of the greater flexibility of transistors. While tube gain can be decreased only by decreasing tube current, gain in transistors can be decreased by decreasing current( reverse biasing), or by increasing current (forward biasing). With tube designs the keying pulse is invariably positive arid developed AGC voltage is negative; with transistors the keying pulse cari be of either polarity and developed AGC can be of either polarity depending on whether the controlled transistors are PNP or NPN units. In tube sets one stage is usually enough for good AGC operation; in transistor receivers it is not uncommon to use an AGC amplifier stage. In transistor receivers, both plain or Zener diodes are often employed, whereas diodes are rarely used in tube sets except occasionally 1ST VID VIDOUT r 000 AVIGATESE Fig. 5. -x000 ' VIDEO TG CRT 6.8K 120K o o 3. K AGC GATE o o K. P. AGC SOURCE o ce) Fig. 4. Trouble in Philco appeared only in changing channels or when signal was interrupted. to clamp the delayed AGC to the tuner. AGC circuits in tube sets usually supply many times the amount of AGC needed for transistor sets. Overall, a great variety of circuit designs are found in transistorized AGC, whereas tube circuits generally conform to a few basic designs. Zenith Chassis IM30T20 (Fig. 5) Conduction of the AGC transistor, X-8, is controlled by voltage applied to its base through R-52. This voltage varies in step with signals from the video section. Specifically, the DC levels attained at X -6's collector at horizontal sync pulse times furnish dynamic bias of the AGC keyer. Correct magnitudes of AGC voltage are developed from the pulses applied to X -8's collector circuit. These keying pulses have approximately 25 volts positive polarity, and are fed through R-122 and C-61 to diode X-39. Negative DC AGC voltage proportionate to signal levels at the video detector develops at the junction of X-39 and C-61. R-90 and R-10, also in the base circuit of X-8, set the static bias level. AGC AMP 1 X2 2ND IF IC) 1ST IF o o -9 TUNER TUNER AGC DELAY Late transistorized TV by Zenith uses this keyed AGC circuit with some interesting features. October, 1966/PF REPORTER 27

30 8 V. DET NOISE GATE VID AMP y VID OUT K. AGC 1-EFFir AGC SOURCE H.O.T. WDG V 1ST IF +29.5V Fig. 6. RCA transistorized TV uses simpler keyed AGC circuit. The noise gate also has a small amount of control over X -8's conduction. Positive bias is applied during large noise bursts through R-97 to the emitter of X-8. AGC developed at the junction of C-61, R-92 and X-39 is filtered by R-92 and C-9 and fed to the base of X-9. The AGC time constants are not very different from those of tube circuits and are capable of minimizing fading signal effects while providing quick acting AGC. The voltage applied to X-9 receives additional filtering and power amplification and is then fed to the return of the base resistor of X-2, the second IF stage. Up to this point this AGC circuit has some similarities to tube circuits; here we come to a major difference. Since the AGC has a negative DC polarity and is applied to the base of a PNP transistor, it constitutes forward biasing and increases current +29.5V of X-2. Inasmuch as it is the function of increasing AGC to reduce gain, it might be wondered how increasing X -2's current can reduce its gain. Here's how forward biasing does it: The increased current produces a greater voltage drop across resistors R-24, R-25, R-26 in the emitter circuit, and also across R-28 in the collector circuit. Therefore the operating voltage of X-2, from emitter to collector, is reduced and gain will be reduced also. But that's not the whole story-higher voltage is also present at the junction of R- 24 and R-25 and is fed to the base of X-1 which it controls by forward bias in similar fashion. In addition, the greater voltage difference between the top of R-28 and the junction of R-25 and R-26 produces delayed AGC from X-7 to control the tuner (forward biasing also). It is interesting to note that not only is this AGC via forward biasing dif- ferent than AGC in tube receivers, it is directly opposed to gain control in transistor radios, where gain is reduced by reducing forward bias. RCA Chassis KCS -153 (Fig. 6) While AGC in the RCA KCS -153 shares some similarities with the Zenith just discussed, it also has its differences. Horizontal sync tip DC levels at the emitter of the first video amplifier, X-4 in Fig. 6, are applied through R-72 to the base of X-6, thus furnishing dynamic bias. From a winding on the horizontal output transformer a 25 -volt negative keying pulse is applied to X -6's collector through X-33. When the two signals at base and collector arrive simultaneously, a positive AGC voltage is developed which charges C-16. After being filtered, the AGC voltage is applied to the base of X-201, the RF transistor. Since X-201 is an NPN transistor and AGC is positive voltage, gain of X-201 is controlled by forward bias, and the greater the forward bias the lower the gain. Voltage drop across R-207 in the collector circuit of X-201 is amplified by increased forward bias and this amplified DC is used to reduce bias and gain of X-1, the first video IF transistor. R-5 and R-19 form a voltage divider across a positive voltage regulated by Zener diode X-43. Voltage at the arm of R-5 is fed to the base of the first IF transistor through X-34. Under reasonably low signal conditions this voltage is the only bias on X-1, but when strong signals are received the amplified AGC from X-201 provides gain reduction in X-1. Thus the IF stage receives delayed AGC-delayed not in time but until the amplified AGC from X-201 attains a certain level. This RCA AGC system has three really interesting features: (1) It employs both reduction and increasing of forward bias to control gain in separate stages. (2) It uses one transistor; X-201, to double as an RF amplifier and also as an AGC amplifier. (3) It applies delayed AGC to an IF stage. Fig. 7. Philco 16JT26 intermixes tubes and transistors but keyed AGC circuits uses transistors. Shop Talk Editor thinks three circuits are typical of future designs. Philco Chassis 16JT26 (Fig. 7) In addition to the all -transistor receivers, which usually drive a 14 inch or smaller picture tube, some Please turn to page PF REPORTER/October, 1966

31 This Service -Dealer is a Wise Guy. He Replaced a Portable TV Antenna With a New JFD Exact Replacement. He's latched on to the biggest money -making idea in years- JFD Exact Replacements. He knows that within twelve months the antennas of 11/2 million portable TV sets (out of the 33 million now in use) will require replacement. He counts on JFD for the right Exact Replacement that earns him a tidy profit on the sale and the installation charge. Besides, who but JFD follows through with big merchandising and promotion aids that tell the world he is Portable TV Antenna replacement headquarters. Interested in getting a share of this nine million dollar after - service market? Then see your distributor. Join the thousands of smart service -dealers who are making it big with JFD Exact Replacements. Write for 1966 JFD Exact Replacement Portable TV antenna catalog. See your SAMS Photofact folders for detailed information. JFD' JFD ELECTRONICS CO. 15th Avenue at 62nd Street, Brooklyn, N.Y JFD International, Woodside Ave., Woodside, N.Y , JFD Canada, Ltd., Canada JFD de Venezuela, S.A., Avenida Los Haticos , Maracaibo, Venezuela ONLY receiving tubes are replaced more often than portable TV antennas! Circle ll on literature ur(1 October, 1966/PF REPORTER 29

32 TUBE and TRANSISTOR DATA RECEIVING TUBES 1 BH2 High -Voltage Rectifier Fil. 0.2A 0.5ma 12BV11 Color Demodulators Fil. 0.45A (11 sec) 9RG 1 2HB 2-7 6BV1 1 Color Demodulators Fil. 0.9A 1 2DW4A Damper Fil. 0.6A (11 sec) 250ma 1 2HB 9HP NOVAR 6HS5 High -Voltage Regulator Fil. 1.5A HL7 Video Amplifier Fil. -6.3/ 0.6/0.3A GY 6 9BF 6KR8A Pentode-Video Amplifier Triode-General Purpose Fil A 12JS6 Horizontal Output Fil A 9DX 1 2FY 30 PF REPORTER/October, 1966

33 17BF11A Pentode 1-Power Output Pentode 2-FM Detector Fil. 0.45A (11 sec) Shorter bulb than original 33GY7A Pentode-Horizontal Output Diode-Damper Fil. 0.45A (11 sec) Less snivets than original EZ 1 2FN DW4A Damper Fil. 0.45A (11 sec) 40KD6 Horizontal Output Fil HP NOVAR 1 2GJ CATHODE-RAY TUBES 9UP4 16CQP4 Protection-none Protection-none Deflection Deflection Filament Filament 0.45A (11 sec) Grid 2-100V 1-5 Grid 2-140V 2-6 Neck Diam " 6 Neck Diam " 3 7GR 7GR 1 2CDP4 16CVP4 Protection-none Protection-none Deflection Deflection Filament (11 sec) Filament (11 sec) Grid 2-140V 1-5 Grid 2-50V 1-5 Neck Diam " GR 8HR 12CTP4 Protection-tension band Deflection -110 Filament (11 sec) Grid 2-100V Neck Diam.-.788" JBP Protection-tension band 3 Deflection Filament 0.6A (11 sec) 4 Grid 2-400V 7GR 8HR October, 1966/PF REPORTER 31

34 State TRANSISTORS (CASE) AD149 Vertical Output PNP-Germanium 2N3566 Voltage Regulator NPN-Germanium AF179 Video IF Amplifier PNP-Germanium 2N3567 Horizontal Amplifier NPN-Germanium CASE Who Said Precision Scopes Have To Be Expensive? Compare the new HEATHKIT DC -8 MHz triggered -sweep scope kit $ wired 10W-14 $ N3568 Horizontal Amplifier NPN-Germanium 2N3569 Horizontal Oscillator NPN-Germanium DC to 8 me bandwidth usec rise time Triggered sweep - 18 calibrated rates Delay -line vertical amplifiers for fast -rise signal analysis 3% calibrated vertical attenuator v/cm to 120 v/cm, 600 v. (max.) input Electronically regulated power supplies Forced air ventilation,built for continuous -duty industrial & lab use L FREE CATALOG Describes this and over 250 other Heathkits. Save up to 50%. Use this coupon for your free copy. Heath Company, Dept Benton Harbor, Michigan Please send FREE Heathkit Catalog & Information describing the New Heathkit Oscilloscope Enclosed is S plus shipping. Please send model Name Address City - Prices & specifications subject to change without notice. Zip_ TE -146 J 2N3638 Vertical Oscillator PNP-Germanium 32 PF REPORTER/October, 1966

35 (CASE) 2N3640 Audio IF Amplifier PNP-Germanium 2N3731 Horizontal Output PNP-Germanium 2N3663 Video IF Amplifier NPN-Silicon 2N3855 Audio IF Amplifier NPN-Germanium 2N3691 Audio IF Amplifier NPN-Germanium 2N3885 Audio IF Amplifier NPN-Germanium WORLD'S FINEST EASIN MULTILORE ARE YOU CASHING -IN ON THE PROFITABLE 2 -WAY RADIO SERVICE BUSINESS? * Motorola will train you for this rewarding, elite profession * Send for our FREE EVALUATION EXAM. Prove to yourself that you are ready to learn FM 2 -way radio servicing. Opportunities in 2 -way radio servicing are virtually unlimited. Just one of the hundreds of successful Motorola Service Stations writes, "we would be pleased to interview any graduate of your school that has received some training in 2 -way radio maintenance. We are an established firm, 10 years old, with a promise of expansion governed by our ability to obtain com- petent technicians." Get all the facts today. There is no obligation and no salesman will call. MOTOROLA TRAINING INSTITUTE 4545 West Augusta Blvd. Chicago 51, Illinois Dept. APX 641 Name Send me FREE entrance exam. Send full details on Home Study Course on FM 2 -way Radio Servicing Send me details on how you can help me prepare for an FCC License. Occupation i BUY IT AT RADIO-TV PARTS STORES Multicore Sales Corp. Westbury, N.Y Circle 13 on literature card I Add regs City Zone State October, 1966/PF REPORTER 33 J

36 how to SELL TV Antennas! by Lon Canter 1965 was a banner year for color television. More than 2.5 million sets were sold. And because color TV is more difficult to receive properly than black -and-white, 1965 was also a banner year for TV antenna sales. The demand was so great that every major antenna manufacturer in the country was heavily back -ordered last fall promises to be even better. Industry experts predict sales of more than 5.5 million color sets. This, in fact, will be the first year that color set sales exceed those of black -and-white receivers. Therefore, sales will soar for those technicians who know how to merchandise color antennas properly. Merchandising is not some mysterious black art. It's just as logical an undertaking as determining why a resistor has burned out. Merchandising principles are well known and widely used in many fields. More important, these principles have been applied to antenna sales by a number of installers across the country. Thus, the techniques discussed in this article are tried and tested. They are a synthesis of the most effective methods used by the most successful TV antenna installers. In short, these techniques can double or triple your antenna business. Tell 'Em What You Got Communication is the first step in selling anything. You have to offer your products for sale. In fact, for mass merchandising, you have to offer your products for sale to many 34 PF REPORTER/October, 1966 people. Further, you have to offer the products to the right people, at the right time, and in the right way. There are two moments in a person's life when he is susceptible to buying a new outdoor antenna: (1) When he buys a new TV set. (2) When his old antenna gets wornout or damaged. If you could have a salesman ready to contact all of the people in your area at these two moments in their lives, you'd enjoy fantastic sales. Unfortunately, that ideal is unattainable. But you can try. Your first step should be to contact all TV appliance stores in your area. Offer to install antennas for them on a contract basis. Here's what you do for the appliance dealer: (1) You train his TV salesmen in how to sell antennas. You show them which antenna to sell for which area (a marked -up map of the area is helpful), and indicate a price for each installation. (2) You install the antenna for him, supplying all parts and labor. (3) You stand behind the installation, handling any callback problems. Here's what he does for you: (1) He sells the antenna installation. (2) He collects from the customer. (3) He pays you for the installation, deducting his profit. In selling TV appliance dealers, point out that what they make on the antenna sale is pure profit. They carry no inventory, have no turnover problems, and no headaches. Experience has shown that, in most areas, from 40% to 60% of their customers will buy antenna installations. Moreover, a good antenna keeps the color set sold and prevents callbacks. Here's how the average sale works: Charge to customer $59.95 Appliance dealer cost Appliance dealer profit $14.95 or 25% Your Costs Antenna $12.00 Mast, cable, hardware, etc Labor Total $30.00 Your profit $15.00 or 33% As you can see, this sale is very profitable, both for you and the appliance dealer. Generally, the appliance dealer gives his floor salesman a 5% commission on the sale (in the case of the $59.95 antenna the salesman gets $3.00). Encourage this. It gives the salesman a good reason to try hard for the antenna sale. Make the salesmen's commission part of your original proposal to the appliance dealer. He pays the commission out of his 25% profit. Use manufacturers' sales aids and literature in the appliance dealer's store. TV -set knob danglers (see

37 Get this $65 RCA color TV course L D 3t rssttr'('rh:r.. rx( IUWn fyiknrftntirr OY A!M.M1tt'a tabwuxxy^#y'e`áe),yre-baßyºfl3<y-ruezc'sy` { Ir«ir+.º wwt <n. wn.nm:.m i. `M 1rrMstaº X.'d iml.eeew xa0 aamlm,n4 art fmb pry COLOR TELEVISION 14OME MOT cour"), RCA INS71tU1R5)NC. n. CrA innrta,. ire us Mew sun,.c. Y when you buy this or this or this or this WR -64B RCA Color Bar/Dot/Crosshatch Generator WR -69A RCA TV -FM Sweep Generator That's right! RCA Institutes famous Home Study Color TV Servicing Course FREE, when you buy ANY ONE of the instruments shown here. Buy all four... get four courses. Enroll all your technicians while you equip your shop with the instruments you'll need for color TV servicing anyway. Here's how it works: Simply buy one, or all, of the four instruments shown, the WR -64B, WR -69A, WR -99A, or WO-91B- ALL essential color TV test instruments-from your Authorized RCA Test Equipment Distributor between now and November 15, Fill out your warranty registration card and attach the white identification label on the carton. Send tl-em to RCA, Test Equipment Headquarters, Bldg. 17-2, Harrison, New Jersey. We will send you the enrollment form and a binder WR -99A RCA Marker Generator WO-91B RCA 5" Scope containing the first two lessons. When you complete the lessons and forward them to RCA Institutes for grading, the next lessons will be supplied to you directly from RCA Institutes, all without charge to you. But do it now. This offer is good only for equipment purchased between September 1, and November 15, To allow for postal delay, we will honor cards received up until December 1, Here's your chance to equip your shop for color servicing while we train your people for FREE! Electronic Components and Devices, Harrison, N.J. The Most Trusted Name in Electronics October, 1966/PF REPORTER 35

38 Fig. 1. TV -set knob dangler. Fig. 2. Store display is lighted and animated. Fig. 1) will serve to remind the customers that they can get an antenna with the TV set. Simple in-store displays (Fig. 2) invite antenna inquiries. Marked -up literature (Fig. 3) can be used by the set salesman to recommend the right antenna and show the customer what he is getting for his money. Of course, you'll need an excellent knowledge of reception conditions throughout your area to recommend the right antenna for each job, and you'll have to negotiate suitable packages for each appliance dealer. Once the customer has been sold a new set, what about the TV owner with the beat -up antenna? How do we reach him? The answer is his TV repairman. Many of the most competent technicians hate to climb roofs. They actually discourage antenna business. Call on all of the TV repair shops in your area and offer to contract antenna installations. Offer them the same terms as you offered the appliance dealer. Point out that you do all the work, have all the headaches, and yet they make 25%. Show them how easy it is to sell an antenna installation after they've repaired the set and reception is still far from perfect. Help them to step their customers up from an older antenna to a quality color antenna. They'll make a lot more money and you will, too. Direct Selling Thus far we have discussed ways of increasing your business through other people. This is important. If you follow this program, you will add many men to your sales force. However, we should not neglect direct sales. One important reason is that you make more money on your own direct sales-the 25% commission becomes yours. Your first step in this direction is identification. You and all of your men should wear uniforms, with the name of your company and the antenna you carry marked prominently on them. Your trucks should be well painted and conspicuously marked. If you have a store front, window signs should be used, such as the American Institute for Better Television Reception sign shown in Fig. 4. And if you have any walk-in Please turn to page 72 a..-gi479if C-3 I:D :'rä. i á SPECIALIST Fig. 3. Sales brochures should always be available. Fig. 4. Window sign identifies you. 36 PF REPORTER/October, 1966

39 install ALLIANCE Tenna-Rotor... now Profit now with world-famou Tenna -Rotors: You'll sell more than ever before. And they're twice as easy to sell! In-store demonstrations sell on sight! Hook up a Tenna-Rotor... Every color set needs one... Then, watch their faces light up when you turn the dial and they see a beautiful color picture. Switch to black & white or FM Stereo. Same result: Tenna-Rotor pulls 'em in sharp, clear, bright and strong! Use the color -TV delivery lag to sweeten up profits with Tenna-Rotor sales, antenna and lead-in wiring jobs. Then, you'll be all set for fast, easy deliveries and installations. Install the world famous Alliance Tenna-Rotor' "TV's Better Color Getter" IANCE Manufacturing Company, Inc. (Subsidiary of Consolidated Electronics Industries Corp.) ALLIANCE, OHIO eallthe Maker of GENIE a Garage Door Openers Circle 15 on literature card October, 1966/PF REPORTER 37

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Electronics Repair Manual

Transcript

Electronics Repair Manual • Electronics Repair Basics • Tools and Test Equipment • Troubleshooting and Maintenance • Specific Repair Instructions • Schematic Diagrams • Component/Manufacturer Indices Editor Gene B. Williams © WEKA Publishing, Inc., 1993 New York • Munich • Zurich • Paris Milan • Amsterdam • Vienna The publisher shall not be liable to the purchaser or any other person or entity with respect to any liability, loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by this book. When attributed as a source, the named manufacturer reserves all rights to the information presented. WEKA Publishing reserves the rights to the format in which such information is presented in the Electronics Repair Manual. For the sum of the other material in the book, all rights reserved by VVEKA Publishing. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means-graphic, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping or information storage and retrieval systems-without the permission of the publisher. WEKA Publishing 97 Indian Field Rd Greenwich, CT 06830 (203) 622-4177 FAX (203) 622-4187 A member of the international WEKA Publishing Group New York· Munich· Zurich· Paris· Milan· Amsterdam· Vienna ©WEKA Publishing, Inc., 1993 ISBN: 0-929321-06-5 WEKA Publishing, Inc 97 Indian Field Road Greenwich, CT 06830 Phone: 203-622-4177 Toll-free: 1-800-222-WEKA ~ Fax: 203-622-4187 L..- ...I USA • Gennany • Switzerland • France • Italy • Netherlands • Austria • Belgium Dear Subscriber, As Product Manager for the Electronics Repair Manual, I'd like to welcome you personally to what I think is the most useful reference source for electronics repair. Your manual occupies a unique place in today's array of electronics books andmagazines; unique simply because it covers and explores all of the areas which are of interest to professionals and hobbyists. From repairing audio and video equipment, to computers, to household appliances and automobile electronics, this manual is packed with valuable information, references, and step-by-step instructions-things you want and need to kll1ow. Repair All Kinds of Electronics Yourself Radio receivers, television sets, VCRs, camcorders, personal computers and peripherals, CD players - whatever your repair job, you'll have comprehensive information within easy reach. For each device covered you'll find: • fundamentals of operation • necessary tools and test equipment • preventive maintenance • troubleshooting and repair instructions Use Universal Repair Instructions for General Troubleshooting Universal repair instructions are provided that apply to entire groups of equipment. You'll find general approaches on how to locate the faulty parts of your device and how to repair it. You can be working on one of the hundreds of VCR models in use today and have valid repair instructions at your fingertips. Profit from Model-Specific Repair Instructions Specific repair instructions show you step-by-step troubleshooting and repair for partilcular models. This in-depth information is illustrated with drawings and pictures, accompanied by checklists and diagrams. As a beginner or professional, this section offers you a tr~asure of tips and hints that will increase your success with repairing all kinds of electronics equipment. Now You Have a Complete Reference Source at Your Fingertips In addition to universal repair instructions and model-specific repair instructions, your manual provides you with schematics, valuable data tables on electronic components, an in-depth section on tools and test equipment, and lists of suppliers and manufacturers. Your Manual Continues to Grow in Size and Value Your quarterly updates to the Electronics Repair Manual provide you with an everexpanding source of repair information. You'll keep up with technological developments and increase your productivity through additional hands-on projects. Shape Your Supplements Use the enclosed questionnaire to help us select the devices and topics for future updates. What devices are you interested in? Do you like more universal or more model-specific repair instructions? What kind of component indices would be of help to you? In a sense, you become a member of our editorial team. You help us to make the manual your manual- to make it what you want it to be. I hope you'll enjoy your edition of the Electronics Repair Manual! Any comments and suggestions you may have regarding this book and the updates are welcomed. We look forward to hearing from you. Sinc:erely, ~!J.U Christopher B. Smith Product Manager for Electronics Publications P.S.: If you like to save time and money, please feel free to give our Customer Service Department a call in order to take advantage of our special subscription offer. You'll be saving shipping and handling for a whole year and you'll receive an additional binder for free! So why don't call today! Our toll-free number is 1·800·622·WEKA. Electronics Repair Manual· Questionnaire 1 How Interesting are the different sections of the manual to you? (please indicate: 1 = highest interest; 5 = lowest interest) Name: Address: 1 Electronics Repair Basics Tools and Test Equipment Video Television Audio Automobile Electronics Computer EqUipment Home Appliances Reference Materials: -Addresses -Indices - Schematics 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 City: Phone Number: ( • State:___ZIP:_ _ ) 2 How Important Is our toll-free hotllne service to you? (1 =very important; 5 =not imponant) 2 0 1 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 3 Which devices would you like to see covered In future updates? Please indicate whether you are interested in: a) maintenance; b) general trOUbleshooting techniques and repair inlitructions; c) troubleshooting certain problems (please indicate the problem) d) case studies to various models [(please indicate the manufacturer and model(s)]; e) schematic diagrams [(please indicate manufacturer and model(s)]. Please note the most important manufacturers for each area. 5 Please mention any other topics that Interest you: 6 Which kind of indices would you like to receive? [Please mention for each index, whether it should be a part number index (p), a functional index (f), or alternate source index (a)] o Thyristors and Triacs o Transistors o Linear ICs such as 0 Diodes 0 Microcontrcillers o Microprocessors o Memories o Other Digital ICs 7 I use th,e "Electronics Repair Manual" for Hobbyonly 8 As a repair technician, do you consider yourself: o 9 o Hobby and business o Business only o Beginner o Advanced o Professional Do you use a computer? 0 No 0 IBM Comp~ltible 0 Disk Drive: o Yes o Macintosh 051/.1" 10 .Which other areas would you like to receive more detailed Information about? o o Other 3Y2" o Integrated Circuits o Data Acquisition 0 Electronics Projects o Electronics Basics o Home Office Computing o Other o Radio Electronics 0 PopUlar Electronics 0 McGraw Hill Electronics Book Club 11 Which magazines do you read? Section 11 Miscellaneous Devices 11/A An Introduction Copier An Introduction Troubleshooting and Repair Fax Machine An Introduction Maintenance Telephone An Introduction Test Equipment Troubleshooting and Repair 11/C 11/C - A 11/C - TR 11/F 11/F - A 11/F - M 11/Tel 11/Tel- A 11/Tel- TE 11/Tel- TR section 12 Reference Materials 121A 12/1 12/5 Addresses Indices Schematics (Note: For more detailed information see "Table of Contents" at the beginning of each section.) Page 4 Section 2 • Preface Table of Contents Section 2 Preface Table of Contents 2/1 Welcome How to Use Your Manual Safety Procedures 2/2 2/3 Page 1 Section 2 • Preface I I Coptents I Ta~le of Page 2 Section 2 • Preface 2/1 Welcome 2/1 Welcome Welcome to the Electronics Repair Manual! This unique publication aims to provide the starter, as well as the professional, with clear and concise information on how to repair and maintain a wide range of electronic equipment. Electronic equipment is complex, becoming more complex almost by the day. Our main objective is to ensure that the Electronics Repair Manual contains comprehensive, instructive and up-to-date material. To help us meet this goal, regular supplements to the book willprovide you with additional troubleshooting and repair instructions, and technological updates. In many cases, electronic equipment is delicate. Touch the wrong point with a probe, or use an improper cleaning material, and what was a simple job turns into a much more extensive one. One home technician was trying to lubricate the tracking bars of a CD player with a spray can ofWD-40. His intention was to cure the skipping that was occurring. Instead he ended up destroying the main circuit board and the laser's lens. The Electronics Repair Manual will help you avoid mistakes, and give you plenty of repair tips and helpful advice. Safety is the most important consideration when you are working with electronics. Always take precautions for your personal safety and the safety of the equipment on which you are working. Your manual includes a detailed safety article which outlines the steps you should take to avoid injury. The article also describes the measures to take in the event of an injury. It is imperative that you only tackle those faults which you understand. Putting this another way, you should only attempt to repair an item of electronic equipment if you are fully confident that you understand what you arle doing. Your Electronics Repair Manual will give you the information and confidence to tackle even complex problems. However, you should proceed cautiously at all times. WEKA Publishing is not responsible for any damage to health or equipment. Page 1 Section 2 • Preface 2/1 I Welcome Many ofyou will wish to specialize in particular areas ofelectronic maintenance. Others will wish to obtain a broader understanding of how to service electronic equipment. The Electronics Repair Manual is designed to satisfy both needs, providing introductory and advanced information on a variety of equipment. We welcome responses from our readers. Your comments and suggestions help us to determine the contents of your future supplements. In a sense, you become a member of our editorial team. You help us to make the manual your manual - to make it what you want it to be. Please use the attached questionnaire to let us know your interests. Tell us which devices, general references, indices, and technologies you would like to see covered in the future. Whether you are a professional technician or an enthusiast working at home, we hope that you enjoy using the Electronics Repair Manual and wish you great success in all of your efforts! Sincerely, Gene Williams Editor, Electronics Repair Manual Page 2 Section 2 • Preface 2/2 How to Use Your Manual 2/2 How to Use Your Manual The Electronics Repair Manual contains 12 sections. Each section is further divided into chapters. Sections 1 to 4 cover general information: Table of Contents, lPreface, Electronic Repair Basics, and Tools and Test Equipment. The chapters in these sections are divided numerically, as you can see in the Table of Contents in Section 1. Sections 5 to 11 contain repair information on specific types of electronic equipment, ranging from radio receivers and CD players to personal computers. The chapters in these sections are divided alphabetically. For example, in "Section 5: Video" you can locate information on camcorders by looking for articles with "5/Cam" as a heading. When you need VCR information, look for "5NCR". This structure will help you keep your manual organized as it grows in the future, allowing you to quickly locate needed information. Below are headings for different sections, showing how the sections are subdivided by numbers and/or alphabetically. Section 3 • Electronics Repair Basics 3/2 Electronics Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - PC 3/2 - C - PC - R Components Passive Components Riesistors Section 5 • Video Steam Camcorders S/Cam - TR S/Cam - TR - PS Troubleshooting and Repair Power Supplies Page 1 Section 2 • Preface /2 HoWl to Use Yourl Manual If you were interested in finding some basic information on resistors, the first place you would look would be "Section 3: Electronic Repair Basics". Once in Section 3, you would locate "Chapter 2: Electronic Fundamentals". In example 1, you will see "3/2 Electronic Fundamentals" in the black box. Once you are in Chapter 2, you would look under the subhead "Components", which is again divided into"Active Components" and "Passive Components". Since resistors are passive components, you would look into this subheading. As you can see in example 1, the subhead abbreviation for "Components" is C. The abbreviation for "Passive Components" is PC. Under the passive compo~ nents subheading you will find the resistors article abbreviated s "R". That is how the article got its chapter number "3/2-C-PC-R". The second example shows you how to locate information on troubleshooting camcorder power supplies. 1) You would look for camcorders in "Section 5: Video" under "5/Cam". 2) All troubleshooting and repair information is abbreviated with "TR". 3) A logical abbreviation for power supplies is "PS". The article you are looking for is labeled "S/Cam-TR-PS". The following short list will show you some abbreviations that are used for each section: A: An Introduction F: Features M: Maintenance TE: Test Equipment TR: Troubleshooting and Repair VCS: Various Case Studies All other abbreviations reflect the starting letters of the devices, parts, and components for which you are looking. Section Twelve contains Reference Materials. This section is subdivided into "12/A" for Addresses, "12/1" for Indices, and "12/S" for Schematics. We developed this alphabetical structure for your manual to allow you to easily insertfuture articles into the book, without messing up a numerical structure. As your manual grows, you will always have a reference that's well organized, upto-date and easy to use. Page 2 Section 2 •. Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures 2/3 Safety Procedures Nothing is more importantthan safety. Trying to save a few dollars in repair costs isn't worth risking electrocution. Safety can be divided into two overall parts-your personal safety and equipment safety. Even an expensive computer system can be replaced. Your health, or your life, cannot. The most basic rule of safety is that if you think safety is for the other guy, let the job be, too. Keep in mind that it isn't just your own safety that is of concern. You are responsible for the safety ofeveryone around you as well. Even ifyou re:cognize that a certain spot inside the TV set you're working on is dangerous, someone else may not. You might understand that the soldering iron is on and hot--a small child coming into your work area might think that it looks like a fun toy. Once you and those around you are safe, be sure that the equipment is safe. Once a technician who was probing a powersupply during an initial diagnosis, touched the probe in a way that caused a short circuit, and blew out the power supply. Warnings • When replacing afuse, use one thatis an exactmatch. Ifthe value is too small, the fuse is likely to blow; if the value is too high, the fuse can't provide protection. NEVER use a wire or other conductor to replace a fuse-not even tempo rari/y. When possible, test and diagnose withthe power offand the unit unplugged. Don't assume an unplugged unit is safe. Some components, particularly capacitors, can hold lethal charges for long periods of time. When power has. to be applied, proceed with extreme caution. Whenever possible, use the "One Hand Rule" (keep one hand in your pocket). Use insulated tools, and hold them ONLY by the insulation. • • • • • Page 1 Section 2 • Preface Pro4edures S~fety I /3 • • • • Wear insulated shoes. Work on nonconductive sUlface, NEVER on a metal table. Be sure the work area is sufficiently lighted. The work area in general should be clean and well organized. a • Remember that heat may also be a danger. Some components get very hot during operation. • Some tools, such as soldering irons, are meant to be hot. If the tip is hot enough to melt solder, it is hot enough to cause serious burns, damage to components and sUlfaces, and ijyou're careless the tip can melt through wires, including the tool's power cord. Always use the right toolfor the job. For example, the tip ofthe screwdriver or wrench has to fit correctly. When clipping wires, use a wire cutter (and of the right size) not scissors. When replacing components, use an exact replacement. Remember: WHEN IN DOUBT, DON'T DO IT! • • • Electric:al Shock Usually there is very little danger from the DC voltage in most equipment. It is generally of low value, in voltage and current. The greatest danger in these areas is to the equipment itself. However, do not throw caution to the wind. Always assume the voltage and current are lethal, and you won't get into trouble. Unless the device is powered by batteries, there is a power supply. This converts AC into DC. The danger to you begins at the wall outlet and could continue well past the power supply. (A television set, for example, takes a very high voltage from the power supply to drive the picture tube.) The AC in the standard wall outlet is 117 VAC (nominal) and is normally protected by a 15 A or 20 A breaker or fuse. The purpose of the breaker or fuse is to reduce the danger of fire. DO NOT count on them to protect you or the equipment. At 117 VAC, it takes just a fraction of an amp to cause your muscles to become Page 2 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures paralyzed. If this happens you won't be able to let go ofwhat is causing the shock. With just a fraction of an amp more, your heart can become paralyzed. That fuse or breaker allows 15 or more amps to flow almost indefinitely. This is hundreds of times what it takes to kill a person. Worse, since these !breakers are designed to allow the heavier current draw for times when motors start, for a second or so the amperage flowing can be much higher. The lesson, again, is that you should not be thinking of that breaker or fuse as a device that will protect you. It won't! As stated above, when working around dangerous voltages and currents, you need to be insulated from the surroundings. It is not overly cautious to work on an insulated surface, while wearing insulated shoes on an insulated floor. Even then, keep one hand in your pocket (the "One Hand Rule") to avoid accidentally having yourself become part of the AC circuit. Merely keeping that other hand back isn't enough. You might be tempted to reach forward with it. Placing it in your pocket will force you to think 'about whatyou are doing. Fire Hopefully you will never have to deal with this problem. If you are careful, you never will. However, you need to be prepared, just in case. The first step is to be sure that there is a safe and quick exit from the work area. This is yet another reason to keep the working area clean and uncluttered. If you have to get out of the area fast, climbing over boxes or taking the chance of tripping on electrical cords increases the danger. Why would you suddenly have to flee? There are two main reasons. One is that you may not be able to get the fire under control. The other is that some electrical fires can release poisonous gases in the air. Even if the fire is out, it may not be safe for you to remain. At least one fire extinguisher should be immediately at hand, and easily accessible. This must be of the right type. For electrical fires you'll need the dry powder type (Type C). Liquids, and water in particular, only make matters worse. Having a fIre extinguisher around won't do much good if you don't know how to use it. The unit should also be serviced on a regular basis (some suggest once per year as a minimum). Don't rely on the gauge. Even ifit shows "good" on the dial, the unit may not be functioning. Page 3 Section 2 • Preface S~fety i /3 Proqedures The working area should be protected with aproper alarm system. The fire alarm, like the fire extinguisher, should be tested regularly. Experts suggest that once per month is not too frequent. First Aid It is a good idea to have a quality first aid manual. You should know the basicsand know them well enough to apply them calmly under an emergency situation. You might even consider taking classes. Many hospitals and medical clinics offer free classes in CPR. The working area should contain a complete first aid kit. As supplies are used from it, they should be replaced. Make sure that the kit is always fully stocked, and with fresh materials. The Shock Victim In the event of an electrical shock the first thing to do is to disconnect the power supply, or remove the person from the supply. Do this ONLY if it can be done safely and without risk of shock to yourself. This may mean standing on insulating material (if available) and pushing the live conductor with an insulator, such as a broom handle. If the person is not breathing, and the heart is not beating, it is essential to act as quickly as possible. The ABC of first aid in these circumstances is: Figure 1: Turn the person onto their back and tilt the head. Page 4 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Airway Open the airway by rolling the person on his or her back, gently lifting the chin forward with one hand while pressing the forehead back with the other. This has the effect of lifting the tongue forward so that it does not block the airway. (See Figure 1). Pinch the victim's nose with your fingers and close it. Take a deep bre~ath, and blow into the victim's mouth. Watch the chestto see ifitrises (Figure 2). Remove your mouth and see ifthe chest sinks. If the chestdoes not go up and down, adjust the position ofthe head andjaw to clearthe airway (Figure 3). Repeat the process. Now check for a pulse as an indicator that the heart is beating (Figure 4). If it is not, go immediately to "Circulation". Breathing Figure 2: Pinch the nose, create a seal between your mouth and theirs, and bllow while watching to see if their chest rises. If the heart is beating, continue mouth-to-mouth resuscitation at a rate of about 14 times per minute until natural breathing begins again. When natural breathing has started, put the victim in the recovery position. That is, move the person so that the front of the body is to the ground and the head is resting with the right side to the ground and the chin tilted to keep thc~ airway clear (Figure 5). The right arm should be down and beside the body, with the left arm forward. The left knee should be bent. Circulation The mostreliable way for an amateur to check the pulse ofan unconscious person is as follows: PageS Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Figure 3: If the chest does not rise and fall, tilt the chin again. Figure 4: Check the pulse for sign of heartbeat. Place two fingertips on the voice box (Adam's apple) and slide them around the neck to either side. A pulse should be felt in either of the two carotid arteries that run up the sides of the neck (Figure 4). The victim must be on his or her back and on a firm surface. Kneel beside the victim and find thepoint where the ribs join atthe bottom ofthe breastbone. Place the heel of one hand on the breastbone about two finger-widths above this point. (Figure 6.) Put your other hand on top of the first and get into position over the victim with your arms straight and your shoulders directly above the breastbone. Keeping your arms straight, press down on the breastbone about 2 inches. Relax the pressure and repeat the process at a rate of just over one per second. Don't Page 6 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Figure 5: With breathing restored, move the person into the recovery position. bang on the chest. Try to simulate the smooth, steady action of normal beating. Complete 15 of these actions and then go back to the head, open the airway and give two cycles of mouth~to-mouthresuscitation. Continue with 15 chest compressions followed by two mouth-to-mouth cycles, checking for a pulse after the first minute and then repeating the entire cycle again, with a pulse check every three minutes. Stop the chest compressions as soon as a pulse is detected. Continue mouth-tomouth until natural breathing starts. If necessary, assist with the natural breathing to help the victim return to his or her natural rate. Figure 6: Pushing on the spot shown causes pressure on the heart. Page 7 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Figure 7: The CPR position. Even with a transformer, where there is an apparent increase in power, the increase in the voltage level is accompanied by a decrease in the amperage. In an ideal (theoretical) transformer, the two balance and there is no net gain in power. (In reality there is a net loss.) Active components can do a variety of things to the current. They can amplify it, modify it in a number of ways and basically make it behave in a desired manner. Vacuum tubes are active components. However, they have been almost entirely replaced by semi-conductors (diodes, transistors, etc.). Semi-conductors are smaller, lighter, or require less energy to operate and are tougher and more capable. You may encounter tubes in old equipment or in equipment that handles large amounts of power (such as large transmitters). Even here tubes are disappearing, since semi-conductors can handle more power. Page 1 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - A Components Active Components An Introduction Page 2 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes 3/2 - C - AC Active Components 3/2 - C - AC-O Diodes Diodes generally comprise a semiconductor P-N junction of either silicon (Si) or germanium (Ge). In order to obtain conduction, the P-type material must be made positive with respect to the N-type material. (The N-type connection is the cathode.) The direction of current flow is from anode to cathode when the diode is conducting (as shown in Figure 1). Very little current flows in the reverse direction. (The amount of reverse current is negligible in most silicon devices.) + A~~C Current flow _ .. Cathod e + Anode P N Figure 1: Forward biased (conducting) diode Diodes exhibit a low resistance to current flow in one direction and a high resistance in the other. The direction in which current flows is referred to as the forward direction, while negative current is called the reverse direction.When a diode is conducting, it is said to be forward biased, and a small voltage (ideally zero) is dropped across it. This voltage is known as the foward voltage drop. The maximum reverse voltage that a diode can tolerate is usually specified in terms of its reverse repetitive maximum voltage, or peak: inverse voltage (PIV). Page 1 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - c 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes -----~~---+ No current flow + Anode Cathode Depletion region.J Figure 2: Reverse biased (non-conducting) diode Typical values of forward current and forward voltage for commonly available silicon and germanium diodes are given below: Table 1 Value of Forward Current and Forward Voltage Drop Forward Current Silicon (1N4148) Forward Voltage Drop Silicon (1N5401) Germanium (OA91) 10llA 100llA 1mA 10mA 100mA 1A - O.43V O.58V O.65V O.75V - O.55V O.60V O.65V O.72V O.85V - O.12V O.26V O.32V O.43V Germanium diodes conduct at lower forward voltages than their silicon counterparts (typically 100 mV as compared with 600 mY) but they tend to exhibIt considerably more reverse leakage current (1 pA as compared with 10 nA for an applied voltage of 50 V). The forward resistance of a conducting silicon diode is also generally much lower than that of a comparable germanium type. Thus germanium diodes are used primarily for signal detection purposes whereas silicon devices are used for rectification and for general purpose applications. Typical forward and reverse characteristics for comparable germanium and silicon diodes are shown in Figure 3. Diodes are often divided into signal and rectifier types according to their principal field of application. Signal diodes require consistent forward characteristics with low forward voltage drop. Rectifier diodes need to be able to cope with high values of reverse voltage and large values of forward current. Page 2 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 ,- C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D =-=...:..:..::r:.=..:..:..::::.::.= Components Active Components Diodes Forward current. IF Silicon (Si) 12 10 8 (mAl 6 4 Reverse voltage. (VRI 2 -100 (V) -75 -50 ~=====:!:=~d=..L....J.."7r_=,......,......:::::r_"'I__l Forward voltage. VF -6 (uA) Reverse current.lR Figure 3: Typical characteristics for comparable silicon and germanium diodes Consistency of characteristics is of secondary importance in such applications. Rectifier diodes are often available in the form of a bridge (see Figure 4) which proves full-wave rectification. »--0+ Figure 4: Bridge rectifier Page 3 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active· Components Diodes Commonly Used Abbreviations A IF c IR K Plot T TG Tj Rth = anode = cathode forward current = reverse current = cathode (in some sources) = total power loss = thermal resistance = temperature = casing temperature = junction layer temperature Tu TK ambient temperature temp. coefficient of the zener voltage t time V voltage VBR breakdown voltage VF forward voltage VR reverse voltage Vz = zener voltage PIV = peak inverse voltage VRRM = max. repetitive reverse voltage = = = = = = = Diode Coding Diode coding can be confusing. At times, several conventions are used simultaneously. For example, a diode coded AAl19 is actually a European labeling scheme (with the first letter signifying germanium, the second showing it to be a general purpose diode). Despite the fact that the label is European, the same diode, with the same label, can be found in the United States. In the European labeling: First Letter Material germanium silicon gallium arsenide, etc. photo diodes, etc. second Letter Purpose general purpose tuning (varicap) tunnel photovoltaic light emitting (LED) controlled rectifier varactor power rectifier zener A B C A B 0 a T X y Z E P With zener diodes, an additional letter may follow the number. This is the tolerance rating. A B 1% 2% C o 5% 10% Some of these conventions can be found in the United States. Cross references for diodes that fulfill the same specifications are easily located (and are sometimes printed on the package). Page 4 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes Also common in the United States is the IN and 2N prefix, which is generally taken to mean that the device is from National Semiconductor, with IN being a diode and 2N being a transistor. To make matters more confusing, the casing type may (and often does) have more than one designation. DO- is a military designation. A DO-7 case.is glass, 7.6 mm long 2.5 mm in diameter. This same casing can be DO-204AA, which is military low··cost. And the same is available as Case 51-02, which generally refers to a consumer product. Do not worry about this too much. Virtually every parts supplier can cross reference. Complete cross reference guides are also available should you wish to purchase one. These contain data about all the different semiconductors, often up to and including ICs and CPUs. (If those are contained, pin-outs and other K 1411 A 007 ~I KlI:::JA Cia. 2.5 0015 ~I KOA I~I '" + Dia.3.2 0027 K([JA Oia.5.33 4.25 0035 K~A [(::J Dia. 5.2 1.85 ~~ + o 0 ~ 0041 Kf4-1 A DDia.2.71 IAIl dimensions in mml Bridge types [ZJ o+ ""' 0 K A Figure 5: Diode casings Page 5 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes technical data for the devices are often given.) Motorola, one of the world's largest producers of semiconductor devices, has more than 50 parts sales offices across the country, and a central office which distributes literature. This includes "The Motorola Semiconductor Master Selection Guide," which is considered by many to be the definitive reference source on semiconductor cross-referencing and data. Those with computers can get all this information on disk, making access even easier. The software is available through a Motorola sales office, through the Motorola Literature Distribution center, and even via download from various computer BBS around the country. If you can't find it in your area, contact: Motorola Literature Distribution Center PO Box 20912 Phoenix, AZ 85036 The following are some typical diode listings and specificatiqns (R = Reverse; F =Forward): Example Germanium Diodes Type AA113 AA116 AA117 AA118 AA119 AA143 AA144 GD731 GD741 1N55A 1N55B 1N60 1N87 1N98A 1N100A 1N270 1N276 1N277 R Voltage 60 20 90 90 30 25 90 40 40 150 180 50 22.5 80 80 80 50 120 F Voltage 1.1 1.0 1.2 1.05 1.5 0.33 1.0

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

IRC log for #debian on 20080629

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

#1 CD Ripper :: 2005-04-19 :: 53
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.31 :: 2003-10-19 :: 59
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.34 :: 2003-10-19 :: 48
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.35 :: 2003-11-17 :: 52
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.36 :: 2003-11-17 :: 55
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.38 :: 2003-12-03 :: 63
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.39 :: 2003-12-15 :: 65
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.40 :: 2004-01-05 :: 58
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.41 :: 2004-01-18 :: 42
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.42 :: 2004-01-18 :: 58
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.43 :: 2004-02-02 :: 64
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.46 :: 2004-03-15 :: 52
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.48 :: 2004-04-02 :: 65
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.68 :: 2005-02-13 :: 40
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.69 :: 2005-02-13 :: 67
#1 CD Ripper v1.72.83 :: 2006-01-27 :: 71
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 26
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 45
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.24 :: 2005-02-13 :: 56
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.26 :: 2005-02-13 :: 66
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.5 :: 2004-03-15 :: 43
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.7 :: 2004-04-02 :: 60
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.08 :: 2003-09-02 :: 60
#1 DVD Ripper 01.03.1936 :: 2004-12-16 :: 54
#1 DVD Ripper 1.2.06 :: 2003-08-02 :: 68
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.0.8 :: 2003-10-02 :: 64
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.10 :: 2003-09-16 :: 63
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.11 :: 2003-10-02 :: 60
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.13 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.14 :: 2003-11-04 :: 57
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.16 :: 2003-11-17 :: 65
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.17 :: 2003-12-02 :: 68
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.21 :: 2004-01-15 :: 63
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.24 :: 2004-03-01 :: 82
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.25 :: 2004-03-15 :: 71
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.26 :: 2004-11-03 :: 18
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.31 :: 2004-11-08 :: 26
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.32 :: 2005-02-13 :: 75
#1 DVD Ripper 2.8.0 :: 2006-04-26 :: 32
#1 DVD Ripper 2.9.0 :: 2006-05-02 :: 83
#1 DVD Ripper 3.0 :: 2006-05-18 :: 76
#1 DVD Ripper 3.1 :: 2006-05-28 :: 80
#1 DVD Ripper 4.0 :: 2006-08-12 :: 58
#1 DVD Ripper 5.3 :: 2007-07-19 :: 87
#1 DVD Ripper SE 1.3.40 :: 2005-01-29 :: 80
#1 DVD Ripper SE 1.3.50 :: 2005-09-20 :: 78
#1 DVD Ripper v2.0 :: 2006-03-26 :: 19
#1 DVD Ripper V5 :: 2007-01-06 :: 83
#1 Popup Blocker 2.0 :: 2004-07-06 :: 37
#1 Screen Capture :: 2003-08-02 :: 54
#1 Screen Capture 3.1 :: 2003-06-17 :: 62
#1 Video Converter 3.1.2 :: 2004-03-15 :: 57
#1 Video Converter 3.1.4 :: 2004-04-02 :: 64
#1 Video Converter 3.5.1 :: 2004-09-24 :: 66
#1 Video Converter 3.6.2 :: 2005-02-13 :: 65
#1 Video Converter 3.6.3 :: 2005-02-13 :: 67
#1 video converter 3.8.1 :: 2005-05-12 :: 68
#1 video converter 3.8.4 :: 2005-06-16 :: 40
#1 Video Converter 316a :: 2004-04-03 :: 68
#1 Video Converter 4.0.1 :: 2006-01-23 :: 45
#1 Video Converter 4.1.11 :: 2006-06-24 :: 73
#1 Video Converter 4.1.14 :: 2006-08-12 :: 74
#1 Video Converter 4.1.25 :: 2007-02-26 :: 72
#1 Video Converter 4.1.27 :: 2007-04-02 :: 80
#1 Video Converter 4.1.6 :: 2006-04-26 :: 31
#1 Video Converter 4.1.8 :: 2006-05-28 :: 64
#1 Video Converter Version 3.6.14 :: 2005-03-26 :: 40
#1 Video Convertor 4.1.14 serial by Extreme Team :: 2006-09-25 :: 69
#1 Video Convertor 4.1.8 :: 2006-05-29 :: 23
#1 Video Convertor v4.1.4 :: 2006-09-08 :: 33
#1.Video.Converter.v4.1.3 :: 2006-03-09 :: 73
#PC#Protect Stealth Activity Monitor V 4.01 :: 2003-04-14 :: 62
$tock Exchange :: 2002-10-18 :: 60
(EAsports) Cricket 2002 :: 2005-10-04 :: 63
(Sonic) MyDvd :: 2005-03-28 :: 55
++Mail v.2.0 :: 2006-02-12 :: 63
.mobile for Desktop PC 1.0.40603.0 :: 2004-07-06 :: 64
00 Defrag Professional Edition 4.0.508 :: 2002-03-19 :: 15
001 Joiner & Spliter Pro 3.0 :: 2007-09-24 :: 42
001 MP3 Encoder 1.0 :: 2002-03-01 :: 14
007 DVD Copy 1.2 :: 2006-01-10 :: 29
007 DVD Copy 5.0 :: 2006-01-31 :: 65
007 DVD Copy v5.10 :: 2006-05-02 :: 48
007 DVD Copy v5.16 :: 2006-08-22 :: 33
007 DVD Copy v5.17 :: 2006-09-01 :: 57
007 DVD Copy v5.33 :: 2006-10-25 :: 80
007 DVD Creator 2.2 :: 2006-01-10 :: 82
007 DVD Maker v3.0.0.45 Keymaker :: 2006-07-03 :: 29
007 DVD Maker v3.0.0.48 :: 2006-07-16 :: 20
007 DVD Maker v3.2.0.0 Keymaker :: 2006-05-02 :: 38
007 DVD Maker v3.49 :: 2006-08-04 :: 100
007 DVD Maker v3.52 :: 2006-09-08 :: 100
007 DVD Maker v3.62 :: 2006-10-18 :: 87
007 James Bond :: 2005-01-23 :: 62
007 MP3 Sound Recorder 1.20 :: 2006-01-10 :: 56
007 night fire :: 2005-09-26 :: 65
007 Nightfire :: 2004-10-05 :: 79
007 Spy Software 3.873 :: 2007-01-09 :: 86
007 Spy Software 2.50 :: 2003-09-02 :: 29
007 Spy Software 3.0 Pro :: 2003-09-02 :: 64
007 Spy Software 3.03 :: 2003-10-17 :: 61
007 Spy Software 3.04 :: 2003-11-04 :: 55
007 Spy Software 3.12 :: 2003-12-02 :: 59
007 Spy Software 3.13 :: 2003-12-02 :: 26
007 Spy Software 3.14 :: 2003-12-02 :: 60
007 Spy Software 3.17 :: 2003-12-15 :: 62
007 Spy Software 3.18 :: 2004-01-05 :: 62
007 Spy Software 3.19 :: 2004-01-05 :: 67
007 Spy Software 3.20 :: 2004-03-01 :: 44
007 Spy Software 3.32 :: 2004-03-01 :: 58
007 spy software new :: 2007-02-23 :: 85
007 STARR Internet & PC Ueberwachung 1.34 :: 2002-08-02 :: 89
007 Stealth Activity Recorder & Reporter v1.3 :: 2004-06-01 :: 50
008soft File Tree Printer v3.1.6.83 :: 2006-03-31 :: 47
010 Editor 1.0.1 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
010 Editor 1.1 :: 2003-11-17 :: 61
010 Editor 1.2 :: 2004-02-16 :: 55
010 Editor 1.3 :: 2004-04-28 :: 50
010 Editor 2.0.1 :: 2005-05-03 :: 44
010 Editor 2.0.2 :: 2005-07-13 :: 70
010 Editor v2.0.3 :: 2006-12-07 :: 69
010 Memorizer 1.1 :: 2004-01-05 :: 60
0190Killer 1.X :: 2002-08-02 :: 60
01W Editor for Win95 1 :: 2003-09-02 :: 62
024h Lucky Reminder 1.41 :: 2004-09-17 :: 75
024h Lucky Reminder 1.5 :: 2004-06-04 :: 50
024H Lucky Reminder 1.62 :: 2004-12-16 :: 44
024h Lucky Reminder 1.71 :: 2005-01-10 :: 78
024h Lucky Reminder 1.80 :: 2005-05-21 :: 55
024H Lucky Reminder 1.81 :: 2005-05-30 :: 67
024H Lucky Reminder v1.83 :: 2007-01-06 :: 80
0FeQudf78uDTjn8inRwPWy4h-P7C861jx-3-10001.txt :: 2007-09-26 :: 0
1 ACE Search Engine Submission 1.0.0 :: 2002-01-23 :: 17
1 CD Ripper 1.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 37
1 CD Ripper 1.61 :: 2003-09-16 :: 36
1 CD Ripper 1.72.24 :: 2003-09-02 :: 61
1 Click & Lock 1.50 :: 2002-08-02 :: 82
1 Click & Lock 2.72 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
1 Click And Lock 2.81 :: 2005-10-23 :: 46
1 Click And Lock v2.9 :: 2006-08-13 :: 62
1 Click And Lock v3.2 :: 2007-01-21 :: 46
1 click anyDvd copy :: 2005-04-30 :: 29
1 click boost :: 2006-12-18 :: 17
1 Click DVD Copy :: 2006-05-10 :: 8
1 Click DVD Ripper :: 2005-01-03 :: 26
1 Click DVD Ripper v2.03 :: 2005-01-03 :: 52
1 Click DVD Ripper 2.03 :: 2005-01-03 :: 65
1 Click DVD to DivX avi :: 2004-11-03 :: 58
1 Click DVD to VCD :: 2004-12-28 :: 56
1 click DVD TO VCD 2.08 :: 2005-09-15 :: 62
1 Click PC Fix :: 2006-03-31 :: 6
1 click pc fix 2006 :: 2006-07-04 :: 7
1 Click Runner 2.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 33
1 Click Unzip! 3.0.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 47
1 Click Wallpaper 1.2 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
1 DVD Ripper :: 2005-04-19 :: 33
1 DVD Ripper 1.2.05 :: 2003-07-19 :: 32
1 Form Proposal - Invoice 1.4 :: 2004-01-05 :: 20
1 Form Proposal - Invoice 1.5 :: 2004-02-16 :: 38
1 Form Proposal Invoice 1.1 :: 2003-08-13 :: 60
1 Form Proposal-Invoice 1.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 54
1 Form Proposal-Invoice 1.2 :: 2003-09-02 :: 54
1 Form Proposal-Invoice 1.31 :: 2003-10-02 :: 36
1 Form Proposal-Invonce v1.31 :: 2003-11-16 :: 23
1 Great Craps Game 1.3.6 :: 2004-07-06 :: 80
1 Moon Above 2.2 :: 2005-02-22
1 Moon Above 3D Screensaver :: 2004-06-01 :: 42
1 Moon Above 3D Screensaver v4.3 :: 2007-09-26 :: 80
1 Moon Above 4.0 :: 2005-01-25 :: 33
1 Moon Above 4.2 :: 2005-01-25 :: 61
1 More Photo Calender 1.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 63
1 More PhotoCalendar 1.0 German :: 2003-05-11 :: 63
1 More PhotoCalendar 1.21 :: 2003-10-02 :: 43
1 more scanner 1.06 :: 2003-10-02 :: 57
1 More Watermaker 1.00 :: 2003-10-02 :: 71
1 More Watermarker 1.20 :: 2005-03-08 :: 75
1 Screen Capture :: 2003-05-11 :: 50
1 st DVD Ripper 5.0.7 :: 2004-07-20 :: 28
1 st DVS Ripper 5.0.7 :: 2004-06-04 :: 16
1 st Mass Mailer 2.3 :: 2003-09-02 :: 68
1 Step MP3 to Audio CD Maker 2.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 51
1 VSTi 2.0.3 :: 2005-06-16 :: 40
1- More PhotoCalendar 1.20 :: 2003-09-02 :: 60
1-2-3 Key :: 2005-03-01 :: 42
1-2-Convert 1.0 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
1-4-All 2.10 :: 2005-03-01 :: 40
1-ACT AntiVirus 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 45
1-ACT Computer Spy 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 18
1-ACT Registry Cleaner 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 15
1-ACT Spyware Remover 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 35
1-Calc 3.2.2 German :: 2007-07-19 :: 33
1-Click Duplicate Delete for Outlook v1.09 :: 2007-11-24
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.1 :: 2003-07-19 :: 40
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.10 :: 2004-02-02 :: 50
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.20 :: 2003-08-02 :: 46
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.30 :: 2003-10-19 :: 65
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.50 :: 2004-04-02 :: 86
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.71 german :: 2004-12-16 :: 63
1-More PhotoCalender 1.0 :: 2003-05-18 :: 63
1-More PhotoManager 1.20 :: 2004-06-16 :: 40
1-More Scanner 1.05 :: 2003-04-19 :: 64
1-More Scanner 1.06 :: 2003-05-18 :: 65
1-More Scanner 1.10 :: 2004-04-02 :: 72
1-More Watermaker :: 2004-09-17 :: 66
1-More WaterMark 1.10 :: 2004-04-02 :: 60
1-More Watermarker 1.0 German :: 2003-07-12 :: 72
1-More Watermarker 1.00 German :: 2004-04-28 :: 88
1-More Watermarker 1.02 :: 2003-11-17 :: 33
1-more Webcam 1.03 :: 2005-10-02 :: 18
1-more-scanner 1.06 :: 2003-05-18 :: 44
1-Net Pal 1.1b :: 2005-03-01 :: 30
1-Net Pal 1.2d :: 2005-03-01 :: 33
1-PhotoCalendar :: 2004-09-17 :: 83
100% Zonealarm security suite 5.5.094 :: 2005-07-17 :: 70
1000 Lots Of Happiness In The Game 1.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 75
1000 Serials 2.0 :: 2005-11-03 :: 63
10DRemote 1.1 :: 2003-11-04 :: 40
12 Ghosts HiSpirit XP 15 :: 2002-06-04 :: 69
123 Avi to Gif Converter 1.0 :: 2003-04-02 :: 63
123 Avi to Gif converter 3.0 :: 2007-07-19 :: 59
123 AVI to GIF Converter ver 3.0 full :: 2006-07-02 :: 28
123 Bulk Email Direct Sender 2003 3.40 :: 2003-08-17 :: 45
123 Bulk Email Direct Sender 2005 Build 3.50 :: 2005-03-08 :: 33
123 Bulk Email Direct Sender.2006 v4.79 :: 2006-08-25 :: 58
123 CD Ripper 1.80 :: 2002-10-04 :: 12
123 CD Ripper 2.10 :: 2005-07-13 :: 42
123 DVD Ripper v1.00 :: 2006-07-31 :: 66
123 Flash Compressor 1.00 :: 2005-02-13 :: 19
123 Flash Image Extractor 1.00 :: 2005-02-13 :: 37
123 Flash Menu 1.02 :: 2004-01-18 :: 75
123 Flash Menu 1.5 :: 2005-07-13 :: 53
123 Flash Menu 1.6.4 :: 2005-10-10 :: 26
123 Flash Menu v1.6.1 - 1.6.4 :: 2006-01-27 :: 84
123 Flash Menü :: 2005-08-05 :: 55
123 Flash Screensaver Maker Professional Plus Editor 2.0.2.242 :: 2003-06-01 :: 31
123 Flash Sound Extractor 1.00 :: 2006-10-02 :: 13
123 Flash Sound/Image Extractor 1.00 :: 2005-02-22 :: 16
123 Hidden Sender 2.41 :: 2003-08-17 :: 42
123 MP3 Wav Converter & Player 3.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 45
123 MP3 Wav Converter&Player 3.1 :: 2003-02-16 :: 21
123 Outlook Express Backup 1.02 :: 2004-06-04 :: 20
123 Pet 5.1.7 :: 2005-11-07 :: 44
123 Pet 5.1.8 :: 2005-11-21 :: 33
123 Photo Screensaver Builder Professional Plus 2.0.2.239 :: 2003-06-01 :: 39
123 Popup Maker v1.01 :: 2006-12-15 :: 53
123 Screensaver Maker 2.2 :: 2002-05-15 :: 14
123 Screensaver Maker 3.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 35
123 Sound Recorder :: 2005-04-19 :: 21
123 video converter :: 2006-05-11 :: 15
123 WashALL Pro 3.15 :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
123.DVD Ripper 1.00 :: 2007-09-26 :: 0
123ColorPicker 1.2 :: 2002-01-23 :: 25
123copydvd :: 2007-05-18 :: 10
123di 3.0 :: 2005-02-20 :: 21
123icon hunter v1.0 boilsoft :: 2004-07-30 :: 56
123IconHunter 1.0 :: 2003-02-02 :: 75
123Pe 4.2.7 :: 2004-06-04 :: 50
123Pet 4.2.7 :: 2004-06-04 :: 60
123Pet 4.2.8 :: 2004-08-01 :: 50
123Pet 4.3.4 :: 2004-12-16 :: 0
123pet 4.4.0 :: 2005-01-25 :: 33
123Pet 5.0.8 :: 2005-07-18 :: 25
123Pet 5.0.9 :: 2005-08-22 :: 44
123Pet 5.05 :: 2005-04-14 :: 62
123Pet 5.1.0 :: 2005-08-14 :: 37
123Pet 5.1.1 :: 2005-08-24 :: 28
123Pet 5.1.3 :: 2005-09-21 :: 25
123Pet 5.1.5 :: 2005-09-26 :: 44
123Pet 5.2.0 :: 2006-01-10 :: 30
123Pet 5.2.1 :: 2006-03-05 :: 33
123Pet 5.2.2 :: 2006-03-07 :: 50
123Pet v5.2.3 :: 2006-05-02 :: 20
123Pet v6.0.1 :: 2006-07-26 :: 33
123Pet v6.0.2 :: 2006-08-22 :: 0
123Pet v6.0.3 :: 2006-09-19 :: 50
123Pet v6.0.4 :: 2006-10-25 :: 62
123Pet v6.0.5 :: 2006-12-20 :: 37
123Pet v6.0.7 :: 2007-01-30 :: 50
123Pet v6.1.0 :: 2007-09-26 :: 50
123Tag 1.1.13 :: 2002-08-18 :: 27
123Tag 1.11 :: 2004-01-05 :: 27
123Tag 1.14.2 :: 2004-07-01 :: 60
123Tag v1.34 :: 2007-11-24
123Violino German 1.01 :: 2004-02-16 :: 53
123WashAll Professional 3.15 :: 2003-07-19 :: 29
128Gamma Encryption 3.5 :: 2002-10-04 :: 100
12GHOST HISPIRITS XP :: 2004-06-15 :: 75
12Ghost SuperGee v6.0.10 :: 2003-01-05 :: 45
12Ghosts HiSpirts XP 5.05 :: 2002-02-02 :: 66
12Ghosts Pro v21.05b :: 2006-07-11 :: 33
12Ghosts Pro v21.60 :: 2004-06-01 :: 20
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 37
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.1.1 :: 2003-02-02 :: 36
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.1.2 :: 2003-02-02 :: 31
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.15 :: 2003-10-19 :: 28
12Ghosts SuperGee Backup 7.02.3738 :: 2003-11-03 :: 80
12Ghosts SuperGee Shredder 7.02.3738 :: 2003-11-03 :: 77
12Ghosts Wash XP 6.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 22
13 Out Card Game 4.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 75
1503 A.D : A New World :: 2004-02-02 :: 93
1503 A.D: The New Wor s/n: ld :: 2004-05-02 :: 81
1503 AD The New World :: 2003-10-06 :: 85
16 VSTi 2.0.3 :: 2005-06-16 :: 54
1930 Ford Screen Saver Retail :: 2002-02-02 :: 25
1939 BattleFleet 1.5 :: 2003-07-19 :: 17
1999 The World Book Encyclopedia :: 2004-03-15 :: 69
1Click & Lock v2.72 :: 2004-07-20 :: 33
1Click DVD Copy :: 2005-06-18 :: 7
1Click DVD Copy 3.0.0.5 :: 2004-07-16 :: 7
1Click Dvd Copy 4.1 :: 2005-01-23 :: 7
1Click DVD Copy 4.1.1.4 :: 2005-03-07 :: 8
1Click DVD Copy 4.1.1.8 :: 2005-05-21 :: 11
1Click DVD Copy 4.2.9.1 :: 2005-11-07 :: 7
1Click DVD Copy 4.2.9.2 :: 2005-12-12 :: 8
1Click DVD Ripper 2.03 :: 2005-05-03 :: 74
1Click DVD to Divx Avi 1.21 :: 2003-12-15 :: 72
1click dvd to mpeg mpg 1.13 :: 2005-08-02 :: 29
1Click DVD to VCD 2.08 :: 2003-12-15 :: 69
1ClickDc :: 2007-03-10 :: 33
1ClickUnzip 3.00 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
1ClickWebSlideShow 2.0.0.24 :: 2003-04-02 :: 60
1ClickWebSlideShow 2.0.0.27 :: 2003-05-11 :: 37
1ClickWebSlideShow 2.0.0.28 :: 2003-06-01 :: 70
1DVDRiper v1.2.06 :: 2003-07-26 :: 31
1st Audio MP3 Maker 1.13 :: 2002-07-15 :: 58
1st Audio Splitter Extractor 1.25 :: 2005-02-13 :: 52
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 1.59 :: 2002-07-02 :: 50
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2.10 :: 2002-07-15 :: 19
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2.15 :: 2002-08-02 :: 17
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2002 1.55 :: 2002-08-02 :: 14
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2002 1.59 :: 2002-08-02 :: 18
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2002 Build 1.59 :: 2002-09-04 :: 36
1st Choice FTP Pro 8.30 :: 2002-03-01 :: 28
1st Choice FTPPro2000 v7.6 :: 2006-07-11 :: 0
1st Choics Browse 98 4.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 0
1st Class Image Viewer 6.01 :: 2002-05-15 :: 33
1st Desktop Guard 1.4 :: 2004-03-01 :: 80
1st Desktop Guard 1.5 :: 2004-09-17 :: 71
1st Desktop Guard 1.6 :: 2005-07-18 :: 21
1st Desktop Guard v1.7 :: 2006-05-19 :: 50
1st Desktop Guard v1.8 :: 2006-08-13 :: 45
1st Directory Email Spider 2002 1.18 :: 2002-08-02 :: 30
1st Directory Email Spider 2005 1.30 :: 2005-02-22 :: 57
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.50 :: 2006-08-25 :: 70
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.50-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 0
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.62 :: 2006-10-22 :: 80
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.62-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 87
1st Disk Drive Protector v1.4 :: 2006-08-13 :: 50
1st DVD ripper 5.0.7 :: 2004-10-10 :: 37
1st Email Address Harvester 1.46 :: 2002-07-02 :: 36
1st Email Address Harvester 2.02 :: 2002-07-15 :: 16
1st Email Address Spider 2.83 :: 2002-07-02 :: 25
1st Email Address Spider 2.94 :: 2002-07-15 :: 3
1st Email Address Spider 2005 3.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 28
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.48 :: 2006-05-19 :: 38
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.50-DVT :: 2006-07-16 :: 55
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.58 :: 2006-08-25 :: 93
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.58-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 62
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.70 :: 2006-10-22 :: 87
1st Email Address Verifier 1.17 :: 2002-08-02 :: 13
1st Email Address Verifier.2006 v4.60 :: 2006-08-25 :: 66
1st Email Address Verifier.2006 v4.60-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 100
1st Email Address Verifier.2006 v4.74 :: 2006-10-22 :: 64
1st Email Adress Spider.2006 v5.70-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 64
1st Email Adress Verifier.2006 v4.74-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 30
1st Evidence Remover :: 2006-06-27 :: 81
1st Evidence Remover 1.6 :: 2003-11-04 :: 55
1st Evidence Remover 1.7 :: 2004-03-01 :: 69
1st Evidence Remover 2.1 :: 2005-08-22 :: 61
1st Evidence Remover 2.3 :: 2007-09-26 :: 25
1st Evidence Remover v2.2 :: 2006-05-19 :: 54
1st Evidence Remover v2.2 REAL :: 2006-07-10 :: 53
1st Fax Extractor 3.02 :: 2005-03-29 :: 33
1st Fax Extractor v5.56-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 83
1st Fax Extractor v5.56_ :: 2006-08-25 :: 25
1st Fax Extractor v5.69 :: 2006-10-22 :: 33
1st Fax Extractor v5.69-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 20
1st Go Warkanoid II Total Edition 2.89 :: 2003-10-02 :: 82
1st Go Warkanoid II Total v2.8.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 75
1st Go Warkanoid II WildLife 2.8.1 :: 2003-02-16 :: 46
1st Go Warkanoid II Wildlife Multilingual 2.7.7 :: 2002-03-19 :: 62
1st Go Warkanoid II WildLife v2.8.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 85
1st Go Warkanoid II WildLife v2.80 :: 2003-01-18 :: 40
1st Go Warkanoid II: WildLife 2.8.3 :: 2003-02-16 :: 73
1st HTML Editor 2.03 :: 2003-07-19 :: 27
1st Journal 1.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 57
1st Look 2.0.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 23
1st Mail Bomber 9.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 83
1st Mail Bomber Pro :: 2003-06-01 :: 44
1st Mail Sender 2.5 :: 2004-01-15 :: 60
1st Mail Sender 2.6 :: 2005-01-10 :: 83
1st Mail Sender v3.1 :: 2006-08-13 :: 58
1st Mail Server v1.7 :: 2006-08-13 :: 89
1st Mail Server v2.1 :: 2006-12-24 :: 58
1st Mass Mailer 1.8 :: 2003-03-03 :: 30
1st Mass Mailer 2.5 :: 2005-02-13 :: 87
1st Mass Mailer 2.6 :: 2004-07-16 :: 88
1st Mass Mailer 3.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 56
1st mass mailer V2.6 :: 2005-09-12 :: 75
1st Mass Mailer v3.1 :: 2006-08-13 :: 73
1st MP3 Wav Converter 2.60 :: 2001-09-10 :: 58
1st Network Admin v1.6 :: 2006-08-13 :: 22
1st Network Admin v2.0 :: 2007-01-21 :: 50
1st Screen Lock 6.0 :: 2004-08-01 :: 65
1st Screen Lock v6.4 :: 2006-06-26 :: 44
1st Screen Lock v6.5 :: 2006-08-09 :: 57
1st Screen Saver Studio key v2.0 :: 2006-03-21 :: 28
1st Screensaver PHOTO Studio Pro Plus 2.02.177 :: 2003-05-11 :: 54
1st Security Administrator Pro :: 2003-06-01 :: 26
1st Security Agent 1.2 :: 2002-02-13 :: 25
1st Security Agent 2.1 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
1st Security Agent 3.3 :: 2002-09-04 :: 14
1st Security Agent 4.1 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
1st Security Agent 4.2 :: 2002-10-17 :: 12
1st Security Agent 4.7 :: 2003-06-17 :: 23
1st Security Agent 4.8 :: 2003-03-03 :: 79
1st Security Agent 5.2 :: 2003-12-15 :: 72
1st Security Agent 5.3 :: 2004-02-16 :: 63
1st Security Agent 6.0 :: 2005-01-03 :: 77
1st Security Agent 6.1 :: 2005-10-17 :: 86
1st Security Agent v4.6 :: 2003-01-05 :: 53
1st Security Agent v6.4 :: 2006-06-26 :: 70
1st Security Agent v6.5 :: 2006-08-22 :: 69
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security 6.1 :: 2005-10-17 :: 27
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.2 :: 2006-05-19 :: 33
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.3 :: 2006-06-04 :: 33
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.4 REAL :: 2006-07-10 :: 27
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.5 :: 2006-08-09 :: 64
1st Security Agent with.1st Screen Lock v6.2 :: 2006-05-19 :: 42
1st Security Agent with.1st Screen Lock v6.3 :: 2006-06-04 :: 18
1st Security Center Pro 4.2 :: 2004-12-16 :: 45
1st Simple HTML Editor 2.0.3 :: 2003-05-18 :: 44
1st Simple HTML Editor 2.1 Build 5 :: 2003-10-19 :: 15
1st SMTP Server 2.2 :: 2003-05-18 :: 87
1st SMTP Server 2.4 :: 2004-03-01 :: 83
1st SMTP Server v2.6 :: 2006-04-04 :: 66
1st SMTP Server v2.7 :: 2006-05-19 :: 62
1st SMTP Server v2.8 :: 2006-08-13 :: 88
1st SMTP Server v2.9 :: 2007-01-09 :: 85
1st Sound Recorder :: 2005-04-19 :: 64
1st Sound Recorder 2.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 47
1st Sound Recorder 4.1.63 :: 2003-02-16 :: 81
1st Sound Recorder 4.1.71 :: 2003-04-02 :: 46
1st Sound Recorder 4.1.75 :: 2003-04-19 :: 91
1st Source 1.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 46
1st STMP Server 2.5 :: 2004-08-01 :: 54
1st There 1.1 :: 2004-01-18 :: 50
1st There 1.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
1st video converter v5.3.7 :: 2004-11-03 :: 42
1st Warkanoid II : Total 2.8.2 :: 2003-02-16 :: 30
1st Warkanoid II : WildLife 2.8.1 :: 2003-02-16 :: 60
1st Warkanoid II : WildLife 2.9.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 57
1st Webcollector 1.28 :: 2002-08-18 :: 33
1st Webcollector 1.68 :: 2002-10-17 :: 35
1stCalendar :: 2006-10-07 :: 0
1stCalendar 1.1 :: 2005-03-08 :: 44
1stCalendar 1.2 :: 2005-04-08 :: 23
1stclass 3000.5 :: 2002-03-11 :: 76
1step MP to CD.maker 1.2.2 :: 2002-01-23 :: 50
1Step MP3 To Audio CD Maker 2.0.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 47
1Stop Organizer v1.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 62
1toX 2.57 :: 2002-01-23 :: 38
1toX 2.59 :: 2002-02-13 :: 50
1toX 2.62 :: 2004-02-02 :: 40
1toX 2.63 :: 2004-02-02 :: 52
2 2.0 :: 2005-12-29 :: 33
2 Decoder and Streaming Pack 3.0 :: 2005-12-29 :: 40
2 Find MP3 :: 2006-10-04 :: 21
2 Power v1.1 :: 2003-01-05 :: 83
2+ Block Buster :: 2004-02-02 :: 40
20/200 2.2 :: 2005-02-17 :: 40
2000 1.08o :: 2005-02-13 :: 100
2000 1.10 :: 2005-04-14 :: 23
2000 1.10.2 :: 2005-02-22 :: 0
2000 1.10.5 :: 2005-10-14 :: 40
2000 1.11.1 :: 2006-03-05 :: 0
2000 Fractal Calendar :: 2006-07-11 :: 50
2000i :: 2004-06-01 :: 28
2000th Firestorm 2.0 (PC) :: 2003-02-14 :: 21
2000th Firestorm 2.0 Screensaver :: 2003-02-14 :: 17
2000th FireStorm Screen Saver :: 2002-01-23 :: 18
2000th HellFire Screen Saver :: 2003-12-28 :: 13
2001 TetRize 2.14 :: 2002-03-19 :: 71
2002 Fifa World Cup Korea Japan :: 2005-10-26 :: 88
2006 Fifa World Cup :: 2006-06-13 :: 49
2006 FIFA World Cup (TM) :: 2006-07-30 :: 72
21 And Fast 1.26.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 20
21 Dic 5.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 20
21 Flying Images Screen Saver :: 2002-01-23 :: 58
21 Hearts 1.0 :: 2003-08-17 :: 55
232Analyzer 4.1 :: 2006-03-07 :: 33
232Analyzer v4.3 :: 2006-05-02 :: 58
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.13 :: 2003-10-02 :: 50
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.16 :: 2003-12-15 :: 75
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.17 :: 2004-03-01 :: 50
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.21 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.24 :: 2005-02-13 :: 75
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.5 :: 2003-05-11 :: 25
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.6 :: 2003-05-18 :: 58
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.7 :: 2003-06-01 :: 43
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.8 :: 2003-06-17 :: 68
24x7 Scheduler Java Edition 2.1.104 :: 2005-05-03 :: 52
24x7 Scheduler Java Edition 2.1.95 :: 2005-04-08 :: 30
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 3.2.7.410 :: 2005-03-18 :: 73
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 4.0.3 :: 2005-08-23 :: 39
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 4.0.4 :: 2005-09-21 :: 30
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 4.0.6 :: 2005-12-07 :: 35
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE v4.0.10 :: 2006-10-18 :: 85
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE v4.0.8 :: 2006-05-11 :: 67
2D 3D Puzzle Dreamy Kiss v1.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 81
2D 3D Puzzle Flowers No1 v1.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 88
2D 3D Puzzle Say I Do 1.0 :: 2003-02-02 :: 30
2D 3D Puzzle War Craft No1 1.0 :: 2003-02-02 :: 55
2D 3D Screensaver Maker 3.10 :: 2005-10-31 :: 28
2D 3D Screensaver Maker 3.61 :: 2007-09-26 :: 50
2D and 3D Animator Deluxe 1.4 :: 2003-03-03 :: 60
2D and 3D Animator Deluxe v1.4 :: 2003-01-05 :: 60
2D DLL Aztec 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 33
2D DLL DataMatrix 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 0
2D DLL MaxiCode 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 100
2D DLL PDF417 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 50
2D DLL RSS 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 0
2D DLL Universal 3.30 :: 2005-01-10
2D IMG Server for IIS 2.0 :: 2005-01-10 :: 50
2D plus 3D_Screensaver_Maker_v3.6 :: 2007-09-26
2D Vector Pak for ACDSee 1.0 :: 2003-08-02 :: 56
2D&3D Animator 1.5 :: 2004-03-01 :: 59
2D+3D Screensaver Maker :: 2007-07-05 :: 30
2Flyer Screensaver Builder 3.0 :: 2002-02-13 :: 27
2Flyer Screensaver Builder 6.0.1 :: 2003-09-02 :: 27
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 4.8.2 :: 2002-10-04 :: 52
2flyer screensaver builder pro 5.0.0 :: 2003-03-10 :: 64
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 5.0.2 :: 2003-03-17 :: 55
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 5.2.1 :: 2003-05-18 :: 30
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 6.2.1 :: 2004-04-02 :: 73
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 6.3.5 :: 2004-12-16 :: 80
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.0 :: 2005-02-22 :: 78
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.1 :: 2005-04-14 :: 65
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.1.1 :: 2005-05-21 :: 43
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.2.0 :: 2005-08-14 :: 35
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.3.0 :: 2005-09-21 :: 53
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.3.1 :: 2005-10-17 :: 40
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.3.2 :: 2005-11-21 :: 50
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.4 :: 2006-02-05 :: 60
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.4.1 :: 2006-03-07 :: 45
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro v7.5.0 :: 2006-04-04 :: 38
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro v7.5.4 :: 2006-09-19 :: 57
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro v7.6 :: 2006-11-20 :: 42
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Professional 4.71 :: 2002-08-02 :: 47
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Standard 5.0.2 :: 2003-03-17 :: 31
2Flyer Screensaver Builder v6.2.2 :: 2004-09-10 :: 60
2Gif 2.7 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
2JPEG 4.0 :: 2002-03-01 :: 72
2Jpeg v2.7 :: 2006-07-11 :: 25
2M Arcade Bubbles 1,3 :: 2003-09-16 :: 30
2M Arcade Bubbles 1.2 :: 2003-08-17 :: 37
2M Arcade Bubbles 1.4 :: 2003-11-04 :: 55
2M Arcade Bubbles 1.8 :: 2005-02-13 :: 80
2M Blocks Swapper :: 2004-08-14 :: 33
2M Blocks Swapper 1.4 :: 2003-04-19 :: 57
2M Blocks Swapper 1.5 :: 2003-05-11 :: 22
2M Blocks Swapper 1.6 :: 2003-06-01 :: 15
2M Blocks Swapper 1.8 :: 2003-09-02 :: 42
2M Blocks Swapper 2.0 :: 2003-11-17 :: 33
2M Blocks Swapper 2.1a :: 2004-01-15 :: 57
2M Blocks Swapper 2.2 :: 2004-04-28 :: 0
2M Blocks Swapper 2.4a :: 2005-02-13 :: 66
2M Blocks Swapper v1.5 :: 2003-04-28 :: 23
2M Bubble Lines 1.0a :: 2005-02-13 :: 42
2M Flower Garden 1,1 :: 2003-09-16 :: 41
2M Flower Garden 1.1a :: 2003-11-04 :: 61
2M Flower Garden 1.2 :: 2004-02-02 :: 42
2m Puzzles Letters 1.3 :: 2004-08-01 :: 37
2m Puzzles Letters 1.3b FR :: 2004-12-16 :: 0
2M Solitaires 1.3 :: 2003-04-19 :: 40
2M Solitaires Collection 1,8 :: 2003-09-16 :: 46
2M Solitaires Collection 1.12 :: 2004-04-28 :: 46
2M Solitaires Collection 1.3 :: 2003-08-02 :: 28
2M Solitaires Collection 1.4 :: 2003-05-11 :: 66
2M Solitaires Collection 1.5 :: 2003-06-01 :: 50
2M Solitaires Collection 1.7 :: 2003-08-17 :: 42
2M Solitaires Collection 1.9 :: 2003-11-04 :: 45
2M Solitaires Collection 2.0 :: 2004-06-16 :: 59
2M Solitaires Collection 2.0a :: 2005-02-13 :: 68
2M Solitaires Collection v1.4 :: 2003-04-28 :: 57
2M SolitairesCollection 1.1 :: 2004-01-05 :: 50
2M Tetrix Collection 1.4 :: 2003-04-19 :: 53
2M Tetrix Collection 1.5 :: 2003-05-11 :: 40
2M Tetrix Collection 1.6 :: 2003-06-01 :: 58
2M Tetrix Collection 2.1 :: 2003-11-17 :: 76
2M Tetrix Collection 2.1a :: 2003-12-02 :: 60
2M Tetrix Collection 2.3 :: 2004-04-28 :: 75
2M Tetrix Collection 2.4 :: 2004-06-16 :: 45
2M Tetrix Collection 2.5 :: 2005-02-13 :: 76
2M Tetrix Collection v1.5 :: 2003-04-28 :: 62
2M Words Collection 1.0 :: 2003-12-03 :: 54
2M Words Collection 1.2a :: 2005-02-13 :: 85
2nd Speech :: 2006-01-23 :: 20
2nd Speech Center 1.30 :: 2003-09-02 :: 50
2nd Speech Center 1.00 :: 2002-02-13 :: 57
2nd Speech Center 1.00 Build 020131 :: 2002-03-19 :: 57
2nd Speech Center 1.10 :: 2001-09-10 :: 66
2nd Speech Center 1.10 build 020415 :: 2002-08-18 :: 60
2nd Speech Center 1.21 :: 2002-07-15 :: 44
2nd Speech Center 1.21.020904 :: 2002-10-04 :: 42
2nd Speech Center 1.3 :: 2003-11-03 :: 50
2nd Speech Center 1.30 :: 2003-04-02 :: 71
2nd Speech Center 1.5 :: 2004-02-02 :: 68
2nd Speech Center 1.50.040216 :: 2004-03-01 :: 63
2nd Speech Center 2.00.041201 :: 2004-12-16 :: 76
2nd Speech Center 2.00.050103 :: 2005-01-31 :: 66
2nd Speech Center 2.00.050428 :: 2005-05-03 :: 50
2nd Speech Center 2.00.050508 :: 2005-05-21 :: 61
2nd Speech Center 3.00.050818 :: 2005-08-24 :: 56
2nd Speech Center 3.00.050830 :: 2005-09-21 :: 62
2nd Speech Center v3.30.7.1025 :: 2007-11-24
2of5 3.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 100
2Remember 1.02 :: 2004-02-02 :: 28
2SXSI-DUHGK-EWIX1-B1Q7F-845T.txt :: 2007-11-24 :: 0
2thumbs up v 2.0 :: 2002-06-17 :: 33
2X Application Server v3.6 :: 2006-06-26 :: 53
2x Cherry Slots All :: 2002-04-01 :: 62
2X Dynamite Slots 1.1 :: 2002-08-18 :: 44
2X Load Balancer v4.02 :: 2006-06-26 :: 44
2X Wild Stars 1.1 :: 2002-05-15 :: 42
2xCalc 5.2 :: 2002-03-01 :: 37
3 Blaster v1.1 :: 2003-01-05 :: 21
3 ds max 5 :: 2005-02-01 :: 44
3 gp video converter :: 2007-02-05 :: 27
3 webTotal TV & Radio Tuner :: 2006-07-31 :: 25
3-D GraphSaver 2.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 0
3-IN-A-BED (Three In a Bed) 2.01 :: 2005-03-01
3-IN-A-BED (Three In a Bed) 3.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 100
3-IN-A-BED 2.01 :: 2003-03-17 :: 13
30 Happy Easter Riddles Screen Saver 5.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 66
30 Happy Easter Riddles Screen Saver 5.00 Us :: 2003-05-18 :: 25
30 Happy Easter Riddles Screensaver 5.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 37
30 Wildlife Scenes Screen Saver 5.00 :: 2004-06-16 :: 55
3001 Space Oddities 1.1.x :: 2003-08-17 :: 46
3001 Space Oddities Screen Saver 1.1.1 :: 2002-02-02 :: 62
31 release 4 (null) :: 2002-01-23 :: 40
32 Card Bridge 1.6 :: 2002-03-01 :: 75
32 Developers Kit 7.10 :: 2005-01-10 :: 33
321 Studios DVD Copy Plus 4.2.0 :: 2004-10-13 :: 12
321 Studios DVD Copy Plus 4.2 :: 2003-08-02 :: 15
321 Studios DVD X Copy Platinum 4.0.3.8 :: 2006-01-04 :: 12
32bit Convert It 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 25
32bit Convert It 9.36.18 :: 2002-01-23 :: 44
32bit Convert It 9.39.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 33
32bit Convert it 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 25
32bit Convert it 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
32bit Convert IT 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 33
32bit Convert IT 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 63
32bit Convert It 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 66
32bit Convert It 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 37
32bit Convert It 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 60
32bit Convert It 9.62.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 80
32bit Convert It 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 50
32bit Convert It 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.67.01 :: 2004-08-01 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13
32Bit Convert It 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 33
32Bit Convert It 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 66
32bit Convert It 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 45
32bit Convert It 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 45
32bit Convert It 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 31
32bit Convert It 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 40
32bit Convert It 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 50
32bit Convert It 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 18
32bit Convert It 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 9
32bit Convert It 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 30
32bit Convert It 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 36
32bit Convert It 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 16
32bit Convert It 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 53
32bit Convert It 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 40
32bit Convert It c9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 37
32Bit Convert It c9.73.01 :: 2005-01-11 :: 0
32bit Convert It c9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 21
32bit Convert It v07.09.01 :: 2007-10-04 :: 0
32bit Convert It v07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04
32bit Convert It v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 75
32bit Convert It v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 50
32bit Convert It v9.89.01 :: 2006-05-19 :: 37
32bit Convert It v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 0
32bit Convert It v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 75
32bit Convert It v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 14
32bit Convert It v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 0
32bit Convert It v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 45
32bit Convert It v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 83
32bit Convert It v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 33
32bit Convert It vc9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 24
32bit Email Broadcaster :: 2005-04-19 :: 36
32bit Email Broadcaster 07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.37.01 :: 2002-01-23 :: 20
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 25
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 20
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 38
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 11
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 14
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 28
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 66
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
32Bit Email Broadcaster 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 66
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 28
32Bit Email Broadcaster 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 55
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 35
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 12
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.78.10 :: 2005-07-13 :: 28
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 11
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 12
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 31
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 14
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.51.01 :: 2003-04-02 :: 31
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 50
32Bit Email Broadcaster e9.73.01 :: 2005-01-11 :: 60
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 38
32bit Email Broadcaster v07.09.01 :: 2007-10-04
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 66
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 46
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 37
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 36
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 75
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 0
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 20
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.97.01 :: 2007-01-20 :: 57
32bit Fax 9.42.01 :: 2001-09-10 :: 60
32bit Fax 9.43 :: 2002-07-15 :: 60
32bit Fax 9.43.01 :: 2002-07-15 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 71
32bit Fax 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 80
32bit Fax 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 81
32bit Fax 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 33
32bit Fax 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 15
32bit Fax 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 36
32bit Fax 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 44
32bit Fax 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 45
32bit Fax 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 25
32bit Fax 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
32bit Fax 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 20
32bit Fax 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 25
32Bit Fax 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 20
32bit Fax 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 9
32bit Fax 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 30
32bit Fax 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 38
32bit Fax 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 54
32bit Fax 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 38
32bit Fax 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 21
32bit Fax 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 28
32bit Fax 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 18
32bit Fax 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 23
32bit Fax 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 43
32bit Fax 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 37
32bit Fax v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 0
32bit Fax v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 44
32bit Fax v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-31 :: 50
32bit Fax v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 40
32bit Fax v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 43
32bit Fax v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 50
32bit Fax v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 0
32bit Fax v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 0
32bit Fax v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 44
32bit Fax v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 61
32bit Fax x9 75.01 DateCode 03102005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 30
32bit Fax x9.57.01 :: 2003-10-02 :: 60
32bit Fax x9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 37
32bit Fax x9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 83
32Bit FaxAmatic 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 0
32bit FaxAmatic 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
32bit FaxAmatic 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 40
32bit FaxAmatic 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 61
32bit FaxAmatic 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 52
32bit FaxAmatic 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 70
32bit FaxAmatic 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 66
32bit FaxAmatic 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 33
32bit FaxAmatic 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit FaxAmatic 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 25
32bit FaxAmatic 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 70
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 72
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.46.01 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 40
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 60
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 20
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 62
32Bit Faxmail Network 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 0
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 66
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 66
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.46.01 :: 2002-10-17 :: 88
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 71
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 16
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
32bit FTP 9.42.01 :: 2001-09-10 :: 0
32bit FTP 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 25
32bit FTP 9.43.01 :: 2002-07-15 :: 100
32bit FTP 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 50
32bit FTP 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 0
32bit FTP 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 40
32bit FTP 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 100
32bit FTP 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 20
32bit FTP 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 50
32bit FTP 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 62
32bit FTP 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 30
32bit FTP 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 42
32bit FTP 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 40
32bit FTP 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
32Bit FTP 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 100
32bit FTP 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 40
32bit FTP 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 58
32Bit FTP 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 33
32bit FTP 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 9
32bit FTP 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 61
32bit FTP 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 26
32bit FTP 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 6
32bit FTP 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 27
32bit FTP 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 55
32bit FTP 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 0
32bit FTP 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 45
32bit FTP 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 31
32bit FTP 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 41
32bit FTP 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 40
32bit FTP p9.51 :: 2003-04-02 :: 27
32bit FTP p9.54.01 :: 2003-08-17 :: 55
32bit FTP p9.60.01 :: 2003-12-15 :: 0
32bit FTP p9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 42
32bit FTP p9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 0
32bit FTP p9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 42
32bit FTP v07.09.01 :: 2007-10-04
32bit FTP v07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04 :: 100
32bit FTP v07.10.01 :: 2007-11-24
32bit FTP v07.10.24 :: 2007-11-24
32bit FTP v9.47.22 :: 2003-01-05 :: 0
32bit FTP v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 69
32bit FTP v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 16
32bit FTP v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 50
32bit FTP v9.89.01 :: 2006-05-19 :: 50
32bit FTP v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 14
32bit FTP v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 71
32bit FTP v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 100
32bit FTP v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 50
32bit FTP v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25
32bit FTP v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 42
32bit FTP v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 12
32bit FTP v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 40
32bit Internet Fax 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 60
32bit Internet Fax 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 30
32bit Internet Fax 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 80
32bit Internet Fax 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 20
32bit Internet Fax 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 75
32bit Internet Fax 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13
32bit Internet Fax 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 33
32Bit Internet Fax 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 33
32bit Internet Fax 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 25
32bit Internet Fax 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 43
32bit Internet Fax 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 30
32bit Internet Fax 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 20
32bit Internet Fax 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 38
32bit Internet Fax 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 46
32bit Internet Fax 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 20
32bit Internet Fax 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 28
32bit Internet Fax 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 42
32bit Internet Fax 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 53
32bit Internet Fax 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 0
32bit Internet Fax i9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax i9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 16
32bit Internet Fax i9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 73
32bit Internet Fax i9.75.01 DateCode 03102005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 52
32bit Internet Fax i9.87.01 :: 2006-04-04 :: 44
32bit Internet Fax v7.09.07 :: 2007-10-04 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 100
32bit Internet Fax v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 33
32bit Internet Fax v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 37
32bit Internet Fax v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 37
32bit Internet Fax v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax x9.51.0 :: 2003-04-06 :: 52
32Bit Multi Clipboard 9.39.01 :: 2001-09-10 :: 0
32Bit Multi Clipboard 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 8
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 55
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 66
32bit MultiClipboard 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 60
32bit Service Monitor 9.38.01 :: 2003-06-17 :: 42
32bit Service Monitor 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 80
32bit Service Monitor 9.43.01 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
32Bit Service Monitor 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
32Bit Service Monitor 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
32Bit Service Monitor 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 71
32bit Service Monitor 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 60
32bit Service Monitor 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 75
32bit Service Monitor 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 20
32bit Service Monitor 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 62
32bit Service Monitor 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 100
32Bit Service Monitor 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16
32bit Service Monitor 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 75
32bit Service Monitor 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit Service Monitor 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 53
32Bit Service Monitor 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 40
32bit Service Monitor 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 30
32bit Service Monitor 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 20
32bit Service Monitor 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 70
32bit Service Monitor 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 31
32bit Service Monitor 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 25
32bit Service Monitor 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 13
32bit Service Monitor 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 44
32bit Service Monitor 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 38
32bit Service Monitor 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 57
32bit Service Monitor 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 37
32bit Service Monitor 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 44
32bit Service Monitor s9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 100
32bit Service Monitor s9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 36
32bit Service Monitor v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 100
32bit Service Monitor v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-24 :: 16
32bit Service Monitor v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 66
32bit Service Monitor v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 25
32bit Service Monitor v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 18
32bit Service Monitor v9.97.01 :: 2007-01-20 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.43.01 :: 2002-08-02 :: 42
32bit Web Browser 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 100
32bit Web Browser 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 40
32bit Web Browser 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 25
32bit Web Browser 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 41
32bit Web Browser 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 12
32bit Web Browser 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 33
32bit Web Browser 9.61.01 :: 2004-01-18 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.63.01 :: 2004-04-28 :: 33
32bit Web Browser 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 100
32bit Web Browser 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 100
32bit Web Browser 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 25
32bit Web Browser 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 20
32Bit Web Browser 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 33
32bit Web Browser 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 16
32bit Web Browser 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13
32bit Web Browser 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 28
32Bit Web Browser 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 37
32bit Web Browser 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 23
32bit Web Browser 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 42
32bit Web Browser 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 10
32bit Web Browser 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 44
32bit Web Browser 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 18
32bit Web Browser 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 8
32bit Web Browser 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 23
32bit Web Browser 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 50
32bit Web Browser 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 25
32bit Web Browser 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 33
32bit Web Browser v07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04
32bit Web Browser v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 50
32bit Web Browser v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 25
32bit Web Browser v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 18
32bit Web Browser v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 12
32bit Web Browser v9.89.01 :: 2006-05-19 :: 0
32bit Web Browser v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 25
32bit Web Browser v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 25
32bit Web Browser v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 60
32bit Web Browser v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 42
32bit Web Browser v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 0
32bit Web Browser v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 12
32bit Web Browser v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 75
32bit Web Browser w9.38.01 English :: 2001-09-10 :: 16
32bit Web Browser w9.61.x :: 2004-02-02 :: 25
32bit Web Browser w9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 33
32bit Web Browser w9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 55
32bit Webbrowser 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 58
35.000 Rezepte mit Le Chef :: 2003-04-02 :: 59
355 Monitor 2.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 28
355 Monitor 3.0.0.1 :: 2004-07-16 :: 0
355 Monitor 3.0.2.0 :: 2004-12-16 :: 100
360 Professional Suite :: 2002-07-02 :: 57
386 Max 7.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
386 Max 8.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 57
3A PDF to HTML Batch Converter 2.0 :: 2005-07-17 :: 16
3A PDF to Text Batch Converter 2.0 :: 2005-07-17 :: 9
3A PDF to Word Batch Converter 2.0 :: 2005-07-17 :: 22
3aLab iRadio 1.1.0.152 :: 2004-01-05 :: 36
3C Chess 1.2 :: 2003-02-16 :: 70
3clickBudget 1.1.18.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
3D Browser 5.51 :: 2003-03-03 :: 80
3D Browser v5.51 :: 2003-01-05 :: 0
3D Button generator :: 2004-06-09 :: 0
3D Mark03 Pro :: 2006-07-11 :: 82
3D 4-in-a-Row 5.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 31
3d albam :: 2005-02-20 :: 42
3D Analog Clock :: 2003-09-16 :: 29
3D Animated Wallpaper :: 2002-04-24 :: 42
3d Animated Wallpaper 1.1 :: 2003-02-02 :: 64
3D Animated Wallpaper 3.0 :: 2003-05-18 :: 43
3D Art Screen Saver 5.00 :: 2002-08-02 :: 0
3D Art Screen Saver 5.00 Us :: 2003-05-18 :: 46
3D BattleShip 1.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 34
3D BattleShip 1.01 :: 2003-06-17 :: 44
3D Belote 2 french :: 2003-02-16 :: 39
3D Blocks 2000 :: 2003-11-17 :: 44
3D Blocks 2004 1.04 :: 2004-08-01 :: 0
3D Blocks.2006 v2.63 :: 2006-07-16 :: 66
3D Blocks.2006 v2.71 :: 2006-11-27 :: 0
3D Blocks.2006 v2.72 :: 2007-01-06 :: 50
3D Blocks.2006 v2.73 :: 2007-01-30 :: 8
3D Bloobs 2.09 :: 2002-02-13 :: 68
3D Box Maker Professional 1.1 :: 2005-11-28 :: 8
3D Box Maker Professional 2.0 :: 2006-01-31 :: 60
3D Box Maker Professional v1.1 - 2.0 :: 2006-02-06 :: 42
3D Browser 5.51 :: 2003-03-03 :: 42
3D Browser Pro 6.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 37
3D Browser v5.51 :: 2003-01-05 :: 75
3D Bungalow Aquarium Screensaver 1.0 :: 2006-05-03 :: 75
3D Button Creator Gold 1.0 :: 2003-04-02 :: 31
3D Button Creator Gold 3.02 :: 2004-10-05 :: 49
3D Button Creator Pro 3.01 :: 2003-07-19 :: 76
3D Button Creator s/n: Gold 3.01 :: 2004-05-02 :: 55
3D Button Studio Creator Gold 3.02 :: 2005-02-17 :: 40
3D Calandar :: 2005-10-26 :: 56
3D Calendar 1.0.05 :: 2003-10-02 :: 57
3D Calendar 3.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 37
3D Calendar 32 4.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 75
3D Calender 5.0 :: 2007-09-07 :: 66
3D Canvas Pro 1.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
3D Canvas Pro 5.08 :: 2002-02-02 :: 30
3D Canvas Pro 5.5 :: 2002-03-01 :: 20
3D Canvas Pro 5.5b :: 2002-03-19 :: 44
3D Canvas Pro 5.5c :: 2002-03-19 :: 0
3D Canvas Pro 5.5c Revision 5 :: 2002-04-24 :: 25
3D Canvas Pro 5.5c Revision 7 :: 2001-09-10 :: 36
3D Canvas Pro 5.6 :: 2002-05-15 :: 35
3D Canvas Pro 5.7a :: 2002-08-18 :: 36
3D Canvas Pro 6.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 20
3D Canvas Pro 6.0 R3 :: 2003-03-17 :: 28
3D Canvas Pro 6.0 R4 :: 2003-05-18 :: 22
3D Canvas Pro 6.0.1 :: 2003-10-19 :: 9
3D Canvas Pro 6.0.1.2 :: 2003-10-02 :: 17
3D Canvas Pro 6.01 :: 2004-06-04 :: 20
3D Canvas Pro v6.01 :: 2003-07-19 :: 16
3D Canyon Flight Screensaver :: 2006-12-29 :: 70
3D Checkers 1.6 :: 2005-08-23 :: 58
3D Christmas Tree Screensaver 1.06 :: 2004-01-05 :: 41
3D Christmas Tree Screensaver v1.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 21
3D Combine 2.6.7 :: 2002-01-23 :: 50
3D Combine 2.6.9 :: 2002-04-24 :: 40
3D Combine 2.7 :: 2001-09-10 :: 33
3D Combine 2.8 :: 2002-07-15 :: 0
3D Combine 2.8.2 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
3D Combine 2.9 :: 2003-02-16 :: 36
3D Combine 2.9.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 9
3D Combine 3.2 :: 2003-12-15 :: 45
3D Combine 3.20 :: 2004-01-18 :: 36
3D Combine 3.4.0 :: 2004-08-01 :: 33
3D Combine 4.0.5 :: 2005-03-18 :: 39
3D Combine v3.20 :: 2004-06-04 :: 42
3D Crazy Clock v2.2 Screensaver :: 2006-05-26 :: 53
3D Custom ScreenSaver 1.0.276 :: 2004-07-07 :: 40
3D Custom Screensaver 3.73 :: 2002-01-23 :: 31
3D Custom Screensaver V3.80 V3.80 From ZDNET :: 2002-04-09 :: 34
3D Designer 9.014 :: 2004-12-16 :: 57
3D Designer German 9.014 :: 2004-12-16 :: 62
3D Desktop Destroyer 1.6 :: 2004-02-02 :: 33
3D Developer Studio 6.0 :: 2005-03-23 :: 78
3D Domino v1.6 :: 2006-02-06 :: 62
3D Dominos 1.4 :: 2002-04-24 :: 57
3d driving school :: 2005-10-24 :: 65
3D Driving-School 3D Simulator :: 2004-11-19 :: 65
3D Earth v2.1 Screensaver (by AOload) :: 2006-05-26 :: 17
3D Fahrschule 5 :: 2007-01-12 :: 55
3d Field 1.9.6.0 :: 2002-02-02 :: 33
3d Field 1.97 :: 2002-01-23 :: 40
3d Field 1.98 :: 2002-02-02 :: 62
3d Field 1.99 :: 2002-02-02 :: 75
3d Field 2.01 :: 2002-03-19 :: 50
3d Field 2.03 :: 2002-08-02 :: 40
3D Fish School 2.21 :: 2004-01-18 :: 65
3D Fish School 2.22 :: 2004-01-18 :: 68
3D Fish School Screensaver :: 2005-03-05 :: 54
3D Fish School Screensaver 1.6 :: 2003-06-17 :: 53
3D Fish School Screensaver 3.92 :: 2007-08-20 :: 30
3D FISH! 2.65e :: 2002-01-23 :: 57
3D FISH! 2.70e :: 2002-01-23 :: 68
3D Formula 1 Screensaver v1.0 :: 2005-05-21 :: 83
3D Foto Studio 1.2 :: 2004-02-02 :: 36
3D Four in a Row 5.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 30
3D FTP 4.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 80
3D FTP 5.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 83
3D FTP 6,01 :: 2003-09-16 :: 39
3D FTP 6.01 :: 2005-03-01 :: 22
3D FTP v7.01 :: 2005-12-01 :: 71
3D Galaxy Journey Screensaver v1.1 :: 2005-04-14 :: 13
3D Geometrical Objects :: 2006-01-10 :: 33
3D Geometrical Objects 01. Apr :: 2004-12-16 :: 50
3D Geometrical Objects 1,3 :: 2003-09-16 :: 22
3D Geometrical Objects v1.4 :: 2004-11-18 :: 55
3D GoldRush :: 2002-08-18 :: 35
3D Grandfather Clock Screensaver v1.0 :: 2005-09-12 :: 74
3D Graph Generator 1.0.0 :: 2004-04-02 :: 66
3D Ground Zero :: 2003-06-01 :: 54
3D Hard Core :: 2003-06-01 :: 60
3D Headings 2.0.140 :: 2003-10-02 :: 68
3D Invigorator Pro (for Adobe After Effects) 3.08 :: 2004-04-28 :: 44
3D Lines And Blocks 1.0 :: 2003-11-03 :: 58
3D Mail Effects 5.5.0 :: 2002-06-04 :: 37
3D Maker 1.1.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 43
3D Maker 2.0.0 :: 2003-12-02 :: 31
3D Maker 2.1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 16
3D Maker for Photoshop 1.2 :: 2003-12-02 :: 52
3D mark 03 :: 2007-05-22 :: 91
3D Mark 03 PRO 3.1.3 :: 2003-04-20 :: 53
3D Mark 06 v1.0.2 :: 2006-04-03 :: 13
3D Mark 2001 :: 2004-06-01 :: 85
3D Mark 2001 built 200 :: 2004-11-03 :: 76
3D MARK 2001 SE :: 2002-10-11 :: 93
3D Mark 2005 :: 2004-12-03 :: 88
3D Mark 2006 :: 2006-01-23 :: 65
3d Mark 2006 Basic Edition 1.0.2 :: 2006-01-23 :: 94
3d mark Pro :: 2003-01-05 :: 14
3D Mark v1.00 :: 2006-12-18 :: 25
3D Mark03 Build 340 :: 2004-05-05 :: 92
3D Master 1.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
3D Matrix screensaver : Inside The Matrix 1.2 :: 2004-09-01 :: 30
3D Matrix Screensaver Inside the Matrix 1.3 :: 2005-02-22 :: 58
3D Matrix ScreenSaver: Inside the Matrix :: 2004-06-04 :: 59
3D Matrix ScreenSaver: Inside the Matrix 1.3 :: 2005-02-22 :: 25
3D Matrix ScreenSaver: The Endless Corridors :: 2005-11-16 :: 67
3D Max 5 :: 2004-02-05 :: 58
3d max 6 :: 2005-05-14 :: 31
3d max 6.0 :: 2004-12-04 :: 34
3d max8 :: 2007-09-30 :: 27
3D Maze Cube 1.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 50
3D Menu Pack Multi Site Edition 1.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 66
3D Miracle 1.60 :: 2003-02-16 :: 0
3D Miracle 1.71 :: 2003-07-19 :: 40
3D Miracle 1.72 :: 2003-09-02 :: 14
3D Miracle 1.73 :: 2004-06-16 :: 71
3D Miracle And 3D Monster Toolkit 4.9 :: 2004-06-16 :: 80
3D Miracle x.xx-1.72 :: 2004-01-05 :: 33
3D Monster 1.51 :: 2003-02-16 :: 50
3D Monster 1.53 :: 2003-07-19 :: 33
3D Monster 1.54 :: 2004-06-16 :: 71
3D Morris 1.4 :: 2002-02-13 :: 54
3D Morris Retail 1.56 :: 2004-06-04 :: 79
3D MP3 Sound Recorder 3.8.12 :: 2005-10-04 :: 41
3D MP3 Sound Recorder 3.8.13 :: 2005-10-31 :: 66
3D Nature :: 2002-10-17 :: 16
3D Night Scenes Screensaver 1.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 30
3D Night Viper :: 2003-09-16 :: 35
3D Night Viper ScreenSaver 1.01 :: 2004-07-16 :: 25
3D Nomaad 1.5 :: 2004-02-02 :: 50
3D Object Converter 1.40 :: 2003-02-16 :: 16
3d object converter 2.0 :: 2003-04-06 :: 45
3d Object Converter 4.0 :: 2007-08-20 :: 65
3D Outer Space Screensaver 1.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 33
3D Photo Browser 8.2 :: 2005-08-24 :: 50
3D Photo Browser 8.5 :: 2006-03-07 :: 60
3D Photo Browser v8.51 Multilingual :: 2006-05-02 :: 75
3D Photo Builder 1.1 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
3D Photo Builder 1.2 :: 2003-12-02 :: 66
3D PhotoStudio 1.1 :: 2002-08-02 :: 87
3D PhotoStudio 1.2 :: 2001-09-10 :: 41
3D PhotoStudio v1.2 Win9xNT :: 2006-07-11 :: 33
3D Pim 1.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
3D PINS 1.2 :: 2002-02-02
3D Producer 1.1 :: 2003-12-15 :: 35
3D Puzzle Cube 1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 16
3D Rad 1.5.3 :: 2005-03-01
3D Rad 2.5.4 :: 2005-03-01 :: 54
3D RainDrop Screensaver 2.0 :: 2003-10-19 :: 51
3D Rijschool SP3 :: 2005-01-04 :: 31
3D RPG Editor :: 2004-08-11 :: 33
3D Sapper 1.1 :: 2003-01-18 :: 62
3D Schach 5.0 :: 2006-04-17 :: 25
3D Sea Aquarium Screensaver v1___ :: 2005-04-15 :: 32
3D Seahorses 1.2 :: 2003-07-31 :: 25
3d sex villa :: 2007-06-23 :: 30
3D Sexvilla :: 2007-05-16 :: 16
3D Sharks Aquarium Screensaver :: 2006-12-22 :: 36
3D Slip Sliding X-Mas Penguins Screensaver 1.2 :: 2003-10-19 :: 27
3D Software Object Modeller Pro :: 2007-10-27 :: 75
3D Soma Puzzle 2.2 :: 2002-04-24 :: 33
3D Spades Deluxe 3.3 :: 2004-11-19 :: 42
3D Star Wars Screensaver 1.3 :: 2007-07-06 :: 16
3d studio max :: 2005-12-27 :: 45
3D Studio Max 2.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 55
3D Studio MAX 4.0 , 5.0 :: 2003-05-10 :: 46
3D Studio Max 4.2 :: 2003-09-02 :: 31
3d Studio Max 5 :: 2007-01-30 :: 41
3d studio max 5 italian :: 2003-06-05 :: 37
3d studio max 5.0 :: 2004-11-03 :: 35
3d studio max 6 :: 2004-10-01 :: 26
3D Studio Max 6 (Spanish) :: 2004-10-04 :: 37
3D studio MAX 6.0 :: 2004-07-30 :: 41
3D Studio Max 7 :: 2005-10-10 :: 30
3D Studio Max 7 trial :: 2006-04-23 :: 49
3D Studio MAX 7 Trial 100% working+activation :: 2007-08-20 :: 18
3d Studio Max 8 full activation :: 2006-02-10 :: 30
3D Studio Max hmm? :: 2004-10-10 :: 17
3D Studio Max R2.5 :: 2007-05-29 :: 25
3D Studio Max v3.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 88
3D Studio Max V4.0 :: 2002-07-22 :: 39
3D StudioMAX R 2.5 :: 2007-05-29 :: 37
3D Studiomax V.6.0 :: 2007-02-26 :: 33
3D Supernova Screensaver 1.1 :: 2005-11-28 :: 78
3D Texture Painter v1.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 80
3D Tiger Tank v2.1 Screensaver :: 2006-05-26 :: 38
3D Titanic Screensaver v1.0 :: 2007-09-26 :: 80
3D Tower Clock Screensaver v1.1 :: 2005-07-17 :: 6
3D Ultra Pinball 1.01 :: 2002-03-19 :: 52
3D Ultra Pinball Real Games :: 2002-04-01 :: 75
3D Ultra Pinball Thrill Ride :: 2002-09-17 :: 80
3D UZ 3.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 53
3D Valentine Hearts Screensaver 1.1 :: 2005-03-07 :: 23
3D View (null) :: 2002-01-23 :: 55
3D Waterfall Screensaver v1.0 :: 2005-08-24 :: 76
3d webmaster 3dstate :: 2007-03-25 :: 69
3D Website Builder 10 :: 2002-01-23 :: 45
3D world map :: 2006-07-20 :: 47
3D World Map (4692-5) :: 2004-10-13 :: 69
3D World Map 1.20 :: 2003-10-17 :: 53
3D World Map 2.0 :: 2005-01-03 :: 74
3D World Map 2.1 :: 2005-02-22 :: 69
3d world map v.2 :: 2004-10-19 :: 60
3D Yams XP 2 french :: 2003-02-16 :: 62
3D Yams XP French :: 2003-07-19 :: 44
3D-ALBUM Commercial Suite v3.28.0 RETAIL-Lz0 :: 2006-07-31 :: 73
3D-Fahrschule 4.5 Europa-Edition :: 2006-09-19 :: 42
3D-FTP 4.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 33
3D-FTP 6.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 27
3D-FTP 6.01 :: 2005-01-23 :: 49
3D-FTP 7.01 :: 2004-11-04 :: 80
3D-FTP v4.02 :: 2006-07-11 :: 66
3D-FTP v6.0 :: 2003-10-30 :: 28
3D-SHAPE 3DViewer v1.50 :: 2007-09-26
3D-SHAPE 3DViewer v1.52 :: 2007-11-24
3dAliens Glu3D v1.3.08 for 3dsmax 7 :: 2005-01-11 :: 25
3dDom 2.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 100
3deep space all :: 2005-04-19 :: 21
3DEM 15.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 75
3DEM 8.0.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
3DField 1.75 :: 2002-08-02 :: 16
3DField 1.86 :: 2002-08-02 :: 66
3DField 1.99 :: 2002-02-02
3DField 2.00 :: 2002-02-13 :: 37
3Dfm 1.0 :: 2002-06-04 :: 0
3DFX Video Renderer 1.2 :: 2002-03-01 :: 25
3DJongg 2.5 :: 2003-03-03 :: 16
3DJongg v2.5 :: 2003-01-05 :: 17
3DMaker 3.2.1 :: 2004-12-02 :: 50
3DMark 03 3.6.0.0 :: 2007-03-21 :: 54
3dMark 03 Pro v3.1.3 :: 2004-04-19 :: 92
3DMARK 06 :: 2006-01-23 :: 96
3DMark 2000 1.1.Pro Build 340 :: 2002-02-13 :: 38
3DMark 2000 v1.1.Pro Build 340 :: 2004-06-01 :: 67
3DMark 2001 :: 2003-02-16 :: 88
3DMARK 2001 PRO SE build 340 :: 2004-06-01 :: 95
3DMark 2003 :: 2003-09-16 :: 63
3DMARK 2003 (1st Release) :: 2003-02-12 :: 49
3dMark 2003 build 330 :: 2003-10-24 :: 93
3DMark 2003 Pro :: 2004-07-11 :: 43
3DMark 2003 Profesional Edition :: 2003-06-03 :: 52
3dmark 2005 :: 2004-09-30 :: 67
3DMark 2006 Professional 1.0.2 :: 2006-01-23 :: 91
3DMark 99 Max Pro - Build 200 99 Max Pro build 200 :: 2005-04-06 :: 64
3DMark Pro 03 :: 2003-05-11 :: 50
3DMark-2005 :: 2005-01-25 :: 90
3DMark03 320 :: 2003-07-21 :: 64
3dMark03 Pro v3.1.3 :: 2004-04-19 :: 94
3DMark05 1.0 :: 2004-10-10 :: 91
3DMark05 1.1.0 :: 2004-12-02 :: 86
3DMark05 Pro 1.3.0 :: 2007-06-21 :: 91
3DMark05 Pro v1.0 :: 2007-01-20 :: 85
3DMark05 Pro [by Pitulon] 1.2.0 :: 2005-03-17 :: 76
3DMark2001 :: 2004-06-15 :: 78
3DMark2001 SE Pro 1.0 :: 2002-02-13 :: 94
3DMark2005 :: 2004-12-09 :: 81
3dmax 6 :: 2004-05-06 :: 43
3dmax7 :: 2005-02-05 :: 37
3DMeNow 1.5 :: 2003-01-18 :: 48
3DMeNow 1.5.111 :: 2002-02-02 :: 59
3DMiracle 1.40 :: 2002-04-24 :: 20
3DMiracle 1.60 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
3DMiracle 1.70 :: 2003-02-16 :: 75
3DMiracle 1.72 :: 2003-09-02 :: 50
3DMobiles ScreenSaver 1.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 60
3DMonster 1.51 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
3DMonster 1.53 :: 2003-09-02 :: 80
3DNA Desktop 1.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 29
3DNA Desktop 1.0.1 :: 2003-03-17 :: 32
3DNA Desktop v1.0 :: 2003-01-07 :: 16
3DNA Loft Package 1.0.0 :: 2003-07-13 :: 11
3DProducer v2.2.1 :: 2006-07-03 :: 60
3DRT Ping Pong :: 2005-10-31 :: 45
3ds max 4 :: 2004-04-06 :: 26
3ds max 4.2 :: 2002-07-29 :: 40
3DS mAX 5.0 :: 2003-03-31 :: 32
3ds max 5.1 :: 2005-03-17 :: 42
3ds max 6 :: 2005-02-25 :: 44
3Ds Max 6.0 :: 2004-08-13 :: 51
3ds max 7 :: 2006-01-23 :: 32
3DS MAX 7.0 7.0 :: 2004-12-16 :: 34
3ds max 8 :: 2007-03-18 :: 32
3ds max 9 :: 2007-11-05 :: 0
3ds max 9 serial :: 2007-05-15 :: 15
3ds max4 :: 2004-07-13 :: 46
3DSexVilla :: 2006-04-28 :: 32
3dsmax :: 2005-10-31 :: 35
3dsmax 4 :: 2002-12-12 :: 39
3dsmax 5.1 :: 2003-06-17 :: 45
3dsmax plugin polyboost 3.0 :: 2007-10-13 :: 18
3dsmax6 :: 2005-06-08 :: 55
3dsmax7 :: 2005-09-09 :: 50
3DSpins 1.3 :: 2002-02-13 :: 28
3DState Developer Studio 6.0 :: 2006-09-13 :: 24
3dstudiomax 4 :: 2003-08-03 :: 35
3DSwapBalls 1.3 :: 2002-02-13 :: 50
3Dt 1.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 33
3DVista Batch 1.1 :: 2005-03-29 :: 35
3DVista Flash VT Exporter 3.6 :: 2005-03-29 :: 39
3DVista Publisher Pro 2.6 :: 2005-03-29 :: 27
3DVista Real Estate 1.0 :: 2005-03-29 :: 21
3DVista Show 1.6 :: 2005-03-29 :: 25
3DVista Skin Editor 2.3 :: 2005-03-29 :: 33
3DVista Skin Editor 3.0 :: 2005-07-18 :: 23
3DVista Stitcher 2.5 :: 2005-03-29 :: 21
3DVista Stitcher 3.0 :: 2005-05-03 :: 24
3dVista Studio 1.9 :: 2002-10-17 :: 28
3DWebButton 1.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 35
3gp converter :: 2006-05-09 :: 37
3GP Movie Studio v1.0.1.109 :: 2006-12-20 :: 72
3GP To AVI Converter Splitter 1.0 :: 2007-09-26 :: 50
3GP to GIF JPEG Converter 1.0 :: 2005-11-07 :: 53
3gp video :: 2007-10-12 :: 33
3gp video converter :: 2007-02-05 :: 30
3GP Video Converter 3.1.5.0512b :: 2006-06-03 :: 43
3GP-Converter :: 2007-06-03 :: 31
3gp-video-converter :: 2007-02-22 :: 41
3gpConvert 2.0 :: 2006-04-19 :: 61
3gpConvert 2.5 :: 2006-01-05 :: 51
3gpConvert 3.0 :: 2007-01-11 :: 51
3IAB Three In A Bed 3.0 :: 2003-05-11 :: 23
3MBTech DVD Jaguar 2.4.1.0.21 :: 2005-03-01 :: 60
3nity CD DVD Burner v1.7 :: 2007-09-26 :: 40
3Planesoft Voyage of Columbus.3D Screensaver v1.0 :: 2006-06-04 :: 57
3Planetsoft Mayan Waterfall 3D Screensaver 1.0 :: 2007-10-04 :: 37
3rd Degree Burn 2003 1.1.2111 :: 2003-01-18 :: 57
3rd Degree Burn 2003 v1.1.2102 :: 2003-01-05 :: 50
3rd PlanIt 7.03 :: 2002-08-02 :: 30
3rd PlanIt 7.05.29 :: 2003-09-02 :: 54
3rd PlanIt 7.08.016 :: 2004-01-05 :: 66
3rd PlanIt 7.10.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 22
3rd PlanIt 7.10.06 :: 2004-03-15 :: 66
3rd PlanIt v6.03.001 :: 2006-07-11 :: 80
3rd PlanIt v8.00.077.1032 :: 2007-09-26 :: 33
3rd PlanIt v8.00.082.1065 :: 2007-10-04 :: 75
3rd PlanIt v8.01.002 :: 2007-11-24
3rd PlanIt v8.01.006 :: 2007-11-24
3six5 3.1 :: 2002-02-02 :: 45
3six5 Personal Pictures 1.0 :: 2002-02-02 :: 42
3S_Accounting_v4.0 :: 2007-09-26
3wGet 1.0.80 Beta :: 2003-11-04 :: 52
3wGet 1.2 :: 2003-10-19 :: 63
4 Corners 4.2 :: 2003-02-02 :: 60
4 Dos 5.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4 Home Edition :: 2004-06-19 :: 40
4 in 1 row :: 2002-08-02 :: 25
4 In a Row 1.1 :: 2005-03-01
4 In a Row 2.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
4 In A Row v1.1 :: 2003-01-05 :: 55
4 Kingdoms 1.0 :: 2003-11-03 :: 45
4 Screens 2.15 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
4-Net 1.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 38
4-Net 2.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4.0 Student 5.00 :: 2002-10-17 :: 34
40.000 Wahammer Dawn of War :: 2006-12-12 :: 63
41437f33ac0bcbb67482ac7c38c360f7c926a.txt :: 2007-11-24
4C 1.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 18
4ComTech Recipe Browser 1.1 :: 2005-03-18 :: 47
4Corners Solitaire 4.1 :: 2002-07-02 :: 23
4Dev Support Fetch Dog 1.0 :: 2003-09-02 :: 36
4Disk Clean Gold 4.50 :: 2004-03-01 :: 35
4DiskClean Gold 3.0 :: 2002-01-23 :: 13
4DiskClean Gold 4.5 :: 2004-03-01 :: 13
4DiskClean Gold 4.5.120804 :: 2004-12-16 :: 13
4DiskClean Gold 5.0.122104 :: 2004-12-27 :: 16
4DiskClean Gold 5.0.122804 :: 2005-02-13 :: 16
4DiskClean Gold v2.5 :: 2006-07-11 :: 30
4DiskClean Lite 2.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 9
4HTML Assistant 1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 33
4Level eZeeScroller 1.0 :: 2004-02-16 :: 33
4S Lock v1.07 :: 2006-07-24 :: 66
4Screens 3.19 :: 2003-03-17 :: 66
4slideshow 1.0.0.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 68
4T DVD and 4T CD :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
4T nox :: 2005-03-01 :: 100
4T Nvntory :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4T Pet :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4T Publication :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
4th Right :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
4TOPS Compare Excel Files 1.0 :: 2005-08-12 :: 40
4TOPS Compare Excel Files v1.0 :: 2006-05-11 :: 18
4TOPS Compare Excel Files v1.1 :: 2006-05-29 :: 21
4U AVI MPEG Converter 1.2.8 :: 2004-12-16 :: 11
4U AVI MPEG Converter 1.3.8 :: 2005-01-10 :: 16
4U AVI MPEG Converter 2.0.5 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
4U AVI MPEG Converter 2.1.8 :: 2005-03-07 :: 37
4U AVI MPEG Converter 2.3.8 :: 2005-03-08 :: 42
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.0.2 :: 2005-06-16 :: 15
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.1.0 :: 2005-08-22 :: 37
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.2.0 :: 2005-10-04 :: 26
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.3.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 58
4U AVI MPEG Converter v3.6.2 :: 2006-04-07 :: 15
4U AVI MPEG Converter v3.8.0 :: 2006-05-02 :: 55
4U AVI MPEG Converter v3.9.2 :: 2006-08-25 :: 52
4U AVI MPEG Converter v5.0.3 :: 2006-11-27 :: 51
4U AVI MPEG Converter v5.2.6 :: 2006-12-15 :: 74
4U DVD Ripper v2.0.2 :: 2006-07-31 :: 20
4U DVD Ripper v2.0.2.8 :: 2006-07-31 :: 58
4U DVD Ripper v2.2.0.3 :: 2006-08-25 :: 72
4U MP4 Converter V.2.1.2 :: 2007-08-25 :: 33
4U MP4 Video Converter v1.2.0 :: 2006-11-06 :: 31
4U MP4 Video Converter v1.6.6 :: 2006-11-27 :: 50
4U MP4 Video Converter v1.8.2 :: 2006-12-20 :: 74
4U MP4 Video Converter v2.1.2 :: 2007-06-09 :: 10
4U MP4.Video Converter v2.1.8 :: 2007-09-26 :: 62
4U MP4.Video Converter v2.2.6 :: 2007-10-04 :: 72
4U Wma mp3 converter :: 2007-11-05 :: 55
4U WMA MP3 Converter 2.2.1 :: 2003-08-17 :: 32
4U WMA MP3 Converter 2.2.3 :: 2003-11-17 :: 26
4U WMA MP3 Converter 2.3.8 :: 2003-12-03 :: 43
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.0.8 :: 2004-01-15 :: 55
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 58
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.1.5 :: 2004-07-26 :: 25
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.6.2 :: 2004-11-03 :: 60
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.8.6 :: 2005-01-31 :: 40
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.0.2 :: 2005-02-13 :: 46
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.0.3 :: 2005-03-07 :: 35
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.0.8 :: 2005-08-12 :: 46
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.1.0 :: 2005-09-26 :: 23
4u wma mp3 converter 5.10 :: 2005-10-23 :: 6
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.3 :: 2006-05-18 :: 14
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.9.2 :: 2007-03-18 :: 20
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.9.3 :: 2007-05-15 :: 17
4U WMA MP3 Converter v3.1.5 :: 2004-12-04 :: 13
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.1.0 :: 2006-02-06 :: 40
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.1.1 Keymaker :: 2006-03-23 :: 31
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.3.0 Keymaker :: 2006-05-02 :: 52
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.6.0 :: 2006-11-27 :: 9
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.6.0-DVT :: 2006-10-25 :: 26
4U WMA MP3 Converter(Version 5.6.0) :: 2007-01-12 :: 63
4U WMA-MP3 Converter 5.0.8 :: 2005-09-15 :: 12
4UMP4VideoConverter :: 2007-04-09 :: 20
5 Card Dash :: 2003-10-28 :: 28
5 clicks 4.0.1 :: 2003-09-16 :: 9
5 Clicks Screen Capture 4.2 :: 2004-04-02 :: 13
5 Dices 1.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 100
5 Or More 2.0a :: 2005-03-01 :: 40
5 Star Zip 1.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
5 StarZIP 2001 v1.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 0
533Soft Box Shot Maker :: 2005-12-12 :: 47
533Soft Exe Wrapper 2.1 :: 2005-10-31 :: 35
533Soft Exe Wrapper 2.36c :: 2006-01-05 :: 70
533Soft Exe Wrapper 2.3c :: 2005-11-21 :: 62
533Soft Exe Wrapper v2.4c :: 2006-05-19 :: 45
533Soft Icon Changer 1.80 :: 2006-03-05 :: 36
54hdd v0.6a6 :: 2004-10-04 :: 33
59+ Log Lite 1.4.0 :: 2004-06-16 :: 57
5Account R2.4 :: 2002-01-23 :: 60
5MCC 2006 :: 2006-07-31 :: 9
5mHerbal 6.0.177 :: 2004-09-17 :: 20
5mID 4.0.176 :: 2004-09-17 :: 40
5mOrtho 4.0.178 :: 2004-09-17 :: 10
5star Audio Studio 1.0.0.0 :: 2006-03-07 :: 29
5star Game Copy 1.0.5.118 :: 2006-03-07 :: 87
5star Game Copy 1.0.5.124 :: 2006-04-26 :: 89
5star mobile video :: 2006-02-26 :: 26
5star Mobile Video 1.5.1.1222 :: 2006-03-07 :: 85
5StarZip 2001 1.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 37
5Talk 1.01 :: 2002-01-23 :: 50
5Time 3.2 :: 2002-01-23 :: 100
5Xpence 3.9 :: 2002-01-23 :: 100
602 Internet Server 3.32c :: 2004-02-02 :: 50
602 Lan suite 2004 :: 2004-07-16 :: 46
602 Messaging Server 3.32c :: 2004-02-02 :: 14
602 SOFTWARE :: 2004-12-17 :: 30
602LAN SUITE 2004 :: 2004-07-11 :: 51
602PC SUITE :: 2005-07-17 :: 21
602pc suite 4.1 (2004) :: 2004-11-08 :: 27
602PC Suite 4.2.06.0213 :: 2006-03-05 :: 31
602Print Pack 3.0 :: 2003-12-15 :: 15
602Print Pack 4.1.04.1027 :: 2005-02-17 :: 6
602Print Pack 4.1.05.0223 :: 2005-03-07 :: 34
602Print Pack 5.0.05.0805 :: 2005-08-22 :: 25
602Print Pack v5.0.06.0426 :: 2006-05-11 :: 39
602Pro PC SUITE :: 2004-08-27 :: 20
602Pro PC Suite 2001 :: 2001-09-10 :: 57
602Pro Print Pack 4.1.05.0322 :: 2005-05-30 :: 35
640 VLK key for Windows XP pro :: 2005-04-19 :: 52
64hdd v0.7a0 :: 2004-10-04 :: 50
64hdd v0.6a7 :: 2004-10-04 :: 50
64hdd v0.7a1 :: 2004-10-04 :: 77
64hdd v0.7a3 :: 2004-10-04 :: 42
64hdd v0.7a5 :: 2004-10-04 :: 50
68000 Integrated Development Environment 2.00 :: 2005-09-26 :: 53
7 dicnnaires utiles :: 2004-08-30 :: 28
7 Download Services 3.2.4 :: 2005-02-13 :: 59
7 Download Services 3.2.5 :: 2005-03-07 :: 50
7 File Boss 1.0 :: 2006-02-13 :: 6
7 iPod Helper 1.0.1 :: 2006-02-13 :: 55
7 Sins :: 2005-05-24 :: 17
7 View Slide Show 1.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 60
7 View Slide Show 2.0.0 :: 2003-08-17 :: 50
72(t) Distribution Software 5.00 :: 2005-02-22
767 PILOT COMMAND :: 2003-01-18 :: 35
767 Pilot in Command :: 2004-06-01 :: 41
7D Swapper 1.4 :: 2002-07-15 :: 60
7View Slide Show 1.0.0 :: 2002-06-04 :: 100
8 Away :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
8085 Simulator IDE v1.80 :: 2003-12-19 :: 42
88 Edit v1.05 :: 2006-07-05 :: 12
8848Soft Convert Doc to PDF for Word v3.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 25
8848Soft Convert Doc to PDF for Word v3.50 :: 2007-06-13 :: 16
8848Soft Convert PPT to PDF for PowerPoint v3.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 23
8848Soft Convert XLS to PDF for Excel v3.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 30
8848Soft PDF Decrypter v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 10
8848Soft PDF Decrypter v2.50-ARN :: 2006-11-06 :: 8
8848Soft PDF Encrypter v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 25
8848Soft PDF Encrypter v2.50-ARN :: 2006-11-06 :: 20
8848Soft PDF Merger v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 4
8848Soft PDF Splitter v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 18
8848Soft_Convert_Doc_to_PDF_for_Word_v3.50-DIGERATI :: 2006-11-12 :: 13
8Mile :: 2003-04-23 :: 50
8Signs Firewall 2.2a :: 2004-02-16 :: 84
8Signs Firewall 2.30 :: 2006-01-31 :: 67
8signs Firewall Remote Administration Tool 2.25 :: 2004-12-16 :: 47
8Signs Firewall Remote Administration Tool 2.30 :: 2006-01-31 :: 45
99 Bottles 1.0 :: 2002-10-17 :: 20
9Tuner 5.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 25
@Air 3.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
@Risk 4.0 :: 2005-12-04 :: 24
@Spider 1.0.2 :: 2004-07-07 :: 71
@Spider 1.2.5 :: 2001-09-10 :: 75
@Spider 1.24 :: 2002-06-04 :: 50
@Spider 1.25 :: 2002-07-15 :: 50

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

5

1.3.1.

Caution for fuse replacement

1.4.

Protection Circuitry

The protection circuitry may have operated if either of the following conditions are noticed:

• No sound is heard when the power is turned on.

• Sound stops during a performance.

The function of this circuitry is to prevent circuitry damage if, for example, the positive and negative speaker connection wires are

“shorted”, or if speaker systems with an impedance less than the indicated rated impedance of the amplifier are used.

If this occurs, follow the procedure outlines below:

1. Turn off the power.

2. Determine the cause of the problem and correct it.

3. Turn on the power once again after one minute.

Note:

When the protection circuitry functions, the unit will not operate unless the power is first turned off and then on again.

1.5.

Safety Parts Information

Safety Parts List:

There are special components used in this equipment which are important for safety.

These parts are marked by (

) in the Schematic Diagrams & Replacement Parts List. It is essential that these critical parts

should be replaced with manufacturer’s specified parts to prevent shock, fire or other hazards. Do not modify the original design

without permission of manufacturer.

Safety

Ref. No.

Part No.

Part Name & Description

Remarks

23

RGRX0071J-F

REAR PANEL

PN

23

RGRX0071M-A

REAR PANEL

PX

37

RKMX0141-1K3

TOP CABINET

65

REXX0728

BLACK WIRE (SMPS-AC)

66

REXX0730

RED WIRE (SMPS-AC)

73

REXX0643

BLUE WIRE (VOLT.SELECT-SMPS)

PX

74

REXX0729

WHITE WIRE (VOLT-SELECT-SMPS)

PX

340

RD-DDTX005-V

TRAVERSE UNIT

(RTL)

A2

K2CB2CB00021

AC CORD

PN

A2

K2CQ2CA00007

AC CORD

PX

A3

RQTX0221-2P

O/I BOOK (En)

PX

A3

RQTX0296-M

O/I BOOK (Sp/En)

PN

PCB8

REPX0728E-C

SMPS P.C.B

(RTL) (PN)

PCB8

REPX0728R

SMPS P.C.B

(RTL) (PX)

PCB9

REPX0728E-C

AC INLET P.C.B

(RTL) (PN)

PCB9

REPX0728R

AC INLET P.C.B

(RTL) (PX)

PCB12

REPX0728R

VOLTAGE SELECTOR P.C.B.

(RTL) (PX)

DZ5701

ERZV10V511CS ZNR

S5701

K0ABCA000007

SW VOLTAGE SELECTOR

PX

L5701

ELF15N035AN

LINE FILTER

L5702

ELF22V022A

LINE FILTER

PX

L5702

ELF22V035B

LINE FILTER

PN

L5703

ELF22V035B

LINE FILTER

T2900

G4D1A0000117

SWITCHING TRANSFORMER

T5701

ETS42BM18GAD

MAIN TRANSFORMER

PN

T5701

ETS42BN1A6AD

MAIN TRANSFORMER

PX

T5751

ETS19AB2A6AG

BACKUP TRANSFORMER

PC5702

B3PBA0000402

PHOTO COUPLER

PC5720

B3PBA0000402

PHOTO COUPLER

PC5799

B3PBA0000402

PHOTO COUPLER

RY5701

K6B1AEA00003 RELAY

F1

K5D802BNA005 FUSE

PX

F1

K5D802APA008 FUSE

PN

F2

K5G162B00016 FUSE

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

449464408 Sm E265 Tier3 En Pdf 1 499

by rce

Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland Less

Read the publication

Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland E265 E305 (Tier 3) WORKSHOP MANUAL R0077 All the information and data contained in this manual are based upon most recent information available at the time of its publication. NEW HOLLAND KOBELCO has the right to implement, at any time, any modification without providing any communication. NEW HOLLAND KOBELCO CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY S.p.A. - Product Support Print No. 604.13.674 Edition - March 2006

Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 IN-1 INTRODUCTION TO THE READER • This manual is written for an experienced techni- - If you have any questions or comments, or if you cian to provide technical information needed to found any errors regarding the contents of this maintain and repair this machine. manual, please contact: - Be sure to thoroughly read this manual for correct NEW HOLLAND KOBELCO information concerning the service procedures. CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY S.p.A. Strada Settimo, 323 San Mauro Torinese (TO) 10099 ITALIA PRODUCT SUPPORT Fax. ++39 011 0077357 ADDITIONAL REFERENCES • Please refer to the materials listed below in addition to this service manual: - Operation and Maintenance Instruction Manual - Parts Catalog WORKSHOP MANUAL COMPOSITION • The Workshop Manual consists of five parts: - The “Operational Performance Test” part includes - “Safety Precautions” the information needed to carry out the machine - “Operational Principle” operational performance test. - “Operational Performance Test” - “Troubleshouting” - “Repair Instructions” - The “Troubleshooting” part includes the technical information needed for troubleshooting and mal- - The “Safety Precaution” part includes the recom- function detection. mended procedures that, if followed, can avoid the risk of accident for operator and for staff related to the work and maintenance machine operations. - The “Repair Instruction” part includes information needed for maintenance and repair of the machine, - The “Operational Principle” part includes the techni- tools and devices needed for maintenance and cal information concerning the operation of main repair, maintenance standards, removal/installa- devices and systems. tion and assembly/disassembly procedures.

Copyright © New Holland IN-2 E265-E305 INTRODUCTION PAGE NUMBER • Each page has a number, located on the external upper corner of the page. Each page number contains the following information: Example: T 1-2-3 Consecutive page number for each group Group number (if exist) Section number T : Technical Manual W : Workshop Manual SYMBOLS In this manual, the following safety alert symbol and signal words are used to alert the reader to the potential for personal injury or machine damage. This is the safety alert symbol. When you see this symbol, be alert to the potential for personal injury. Never fail to follow the safety instructions prescribed along with the safety alert symbol. The safety alert symbol is also used to draw attentio in to component/part weights. To avoid injury and damage, be sure to use appropriate lifting techniques and equipment when lifting heavy parts. UNITS USED SI Units (International System of Units) are used in this manual. MKSA system units and English units are also indicated in parentheses just behinds SI units. Example: 24.5 MPa (250 kgf/cm2) A table for conversion from SI units to other system units is shown below for reference purposes. To To Quantity convert Into Multiply by Quantity convert Into Multiply by from (SI) (Others) from (SI) (Others) Lenght mm in 0.03937 Pressure MPa kgf/cm2 10.197 mm ft 0.003281 MPa psi 145.0 L US gal 0.2642 Power kW CV-PS 1.360 Volume L US qt 1.057 kW HP 1.341 m3 yd3 1.308 Temperature °C °F °C x 1.8 + 32 Mass kg lb 2.205 Velocity km/h mph 0.6214 -1 Force N kgf 0.10197 min rpm 1.0 N lbf 0.2248 Flow rate L/min US gpm 0.2642 Torque N.m kgf.m 0.10197 mL/rev cc/rev 1.0 N.m lbf.ft 0.7375

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 INDEX INDEX MANUAL INDEX SAFETY PRECAUTIONS Pag. Section 1 GENERALITIES .................................................................... S1 Section 2 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS .................................................. S2 Section 3 SAFETY PLATES ................................................................ S3 OPERATIONAL PRINCIPLE Section 1 GENERAL Group 1 Specifications ........................................................................... T1-1 Group 2 Component Layout ................................................................... T1-2 Section 2 SYSTEM Group 1 Mechatro Control System ........................................................ T2-1 Group 2 Mechatro Controller ................................................................. T2-2 Group 3 Hydraulic System .................................................................... T2-3 Group 4 Electrical System .................................................................... T2-4 Section 3 COMPONENT OPERATION Group 1 Hydraulic Pump Assy .............................................................. T3-1 Group 2 Pilot Valve ................................................................................ T3-2 Group 3 Control Valve ........................................................................... T3-3 Group 4 Swing Device .......................................................................... T3-4 Group 5 Travel Device ........................................................................... T3-5 Group 6 Swivel Joint ............................................................................. T3-6 Group 7 Cylinders ................................................................................. T3-7 Group 8 Air Conditioner ........................................................................ T3-8 OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE TEST Section 4 OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE TEST Group 1 Introduction .............................................................................. T4-1 Group 2 Standard Performances............................................................ T4-2 Group 3 Test Procedures ....................................................................... T4-3 Group 4 Mechatro Controller Adjustment ............................................... T4-4 TROUBLESHOOTING Section 5 TROUBLESHOOTING Group 1 Mechatro Control ..................................................................... T5-1 Group 2 Hydraulic System .................................................................... T5-2 Group 3 Electrical System .................................................................... T5-3 Group 4 Engine ..................................................................................... T5-4

Copyright © New Holland INDEX E265-E305 INDEX REPAIR INSTRUCTIONS Section 1 GENERAL INFORMATION Group 1 Precautions for Disassembly and Assembly ...................... W1-1 Group 2 Tightening Torque ............................................................... W1-2 Section 2 UPPERSTRUCTURE Group 1 Cab ....................................................................................... W2-1 Group 2 Air Conditioner ...................................................................... W2-2 Group 3 Counterweight ....................................................................... W2-3 Group 4 Main Frame ........................................................................... W2-4 Group 5 Pump Device ........................................................................ W2-5 Group 6 Control Valve ........................................................................ W2-6 Group 7 Swing Device ........................................................................ W2-7 Group 8 Pilot Valve ............................................................................ W2-8 Group 9 Solenoid Valve Unit ............................................................... W2-9 Section 3 UNDERCARRIAGE Group 1 Swing Bearing ....................................................................... W3-1 Group 2 Travel Device ........................................................................ W3-2 Group 3 Swivel Joint .......................................................................... W3-3 Group 4 Track Adjuster ....................................................................... W3-4 Group 5 Front Idler ............................................................................. W3-5 Group 6 Upper and Lower Roller ......................................................... W3-6 Group 7 Tracks ................................................................................... W3-7 Section 4 FRONT ATTACHMENT Group 1 Front Attachment .................................................................. W4-1 Group 2 Cylinders ............................................................................. W4-2 ENGINE Refer to the manual: REPAIR MANUAL FOR CNH U.K. ENGINES 667TA/EEG - 667TA/EEC - 667TA/EBF - 667TA/EED - 667TA/EBD Print no : 604.13.689

Copyright © New Holland SAFETY PRECAUTIONS R0077

Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland SAFETY PRECAUTIONS E265-E305 INDEX Section 1 GENERALITIES Section 2 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS Section 3 SAFETY PLATES

Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S1-1 GENERALITIES GENERALITIES Such paths should be opportunely defined by compe- tent Authorities. If necessary, require that the service Read the Operation and Maintenance Instruction is interrupted or said installations are moved prior to Manual carefully before starting, operating, maintain- starting the work. ing, fuelling or servicing the machine. You must know the working capacity of the machine. Carefully read the explanation to each and all safety Define the rear upperstructure swing area and provide signs in the special section of this Manual before start- for opportune barriers to prevent access into it. ing, operating, maintaining, fuelling or servicing the Never exceed machine lifting capacity. machine. Remain within the limits shown in the loading capac- Machine-mounted safety plates are colour coded yel- ity chart which located on the machine. low with black borders when they refer to points where special ATTENTION must be paid and failure to ob- serve them may cause a serious DANGER to the in- tegrity of machine operators. They are white with red borders and black lettering when they refer to a FOR- STARTING BIDDEN practice. It is fundamental that all machine operators know very Never start or operate a failed machine. Walk all well the meaning of each safety plate as this consid- around the machine before mounting. erably decreases operating hazards and accidents. Before operating the machine, make sure that any Do not allow unauthorised personnel to operate or possible dangerous condition has been properly re- service this machine. moved. Before starting machine, check that steering Do not wear rings, wrist watches, jewellery, loose or and attachment controls are in the neutral position hanging garments, such as ties, torn clothing, and the safety lever is in the LOCK position. Immedi- scarves, unbuttoned or unzipped jackets that can get ately report any malfunction of parts or systems to caught in moving parts. Wear certified safety clothes the maintenance managers for proper action. such as: hard hat, no-slip footwear, heavy gloves, ear Prior to starting the engine, check, adjust and lock protection, safety glasses , reflector vests, respira- the driver’s seat for maximum riding comfort and con- tors every time the job requires it. Ask your employer trol accessibility. Prior to operating the machine and/ about safety regulations in force and protective equip- or its attachments, check that bystanders are out- ment. side the machine operating range. Sound the horn. Always keep the operator’s compartment, step plates, Obey all hand signals, safety indications and signs. grab-rails and handles clean and clear of foreign ob- Due to the presence of flammable fluids, never check jects, oil, grease, mud or snow to minimise the dan- fuel level, refuel, charge the batteries in the presence ger of slipping or stumbling. Remove mud or grease of smoking materials, open flames or sparks. from your shoes before operating the machine. Ensure that nobody is within the excavator operat- Do not jump on or off the machine. Always keep both ing area before starting the machine, swinging the hands and one foot, or both feet and one hand in upper structure or moving in any direction. contact with steps and/or grab rails. Adjust all rear-view mirrors for maximum visibility of Do not use controls or hoses as hand holds. Hoses the area behind the machine. and controls are movable parts and do not provide Ensure that engine speed is appropriate to the job to solid support. Besides, controls may be inadvert- be carried out. ently moved and cause unexpected movement of the If any hydraulic control or system exhibits erratic per- machine or its attachments. formance or responds abnormally, have the machine Never operate the machine or its attachments from checked for air in the system. any position other than sitting in the driver’s seat. Keep Air in these circuits may cause incorrect movements head, body, limbs, hands and feet inside the opera- with consequent accident hazard. Refer to the Opera- tor’s compartment at all times to reduce exposure to tion and Maintenance Instruction Manual about cor- external hazards. rective action to be taken. Be careful of possible slippery conditions of the steps and hand rails as well as of the ground around the machine. Wear protective boots or shoes with the soles made of highly no-slip rubber Do not leave the machine until it has come to a OPERATING complete stop. Always check height, width and weight limitations Do not run the engine of this machine in closed which may be encountered in the working site and buildings without proper ventilation capable to re- ensure the machine does not exceed them. move harmful exhaust gases which concentrate in Assess exact paths of gas ducts, water mains, tel- the air. ephone lines, sewers, overhead and underground elec- Keep the operator’s compartment free of foreign ob- tric lines and all other possible obstacles. jects, especially if not firmly secured. Never use the

Copyright © New Holland S1-2 E265-E305 GENERALITIES machine to transport objects, unless proper securing If noise level is high and exceeds 90 dB (A) over 8 points are provided. hours at the operator’s ear, wear approved ear protec- Do not carry riders on the machine. tion in compliance with local regulations. Study and familiarise with escape routes alternative Do not operate the machine if you are extremely tired to normal exit routes. or feel ill. For your personal safety, do not climb on or off the Be especially careful towards the end of the working machine while it is in motion. shift. Make sure that bystanders are clear of the machine Where removable counterweights are provided, do not operating range before starting the engine and oper- operate the machine if they have been removed. ating the attachment. Sound the horn. When operating the machine, keep in mind height lim- Obey all hand signals, safety indications and signs. its of overhead doors, arches, overhead cables and When backing, always look to where the machine is lines as well as width limits of corridors, roads and to be moved. Be alert of the position of bystanders. narrow passages. Also, get to know load limits of the Should someone enter the work area, stop the ma- ground and paving type of the ramps you are to work chine. on. Maintain a safe distance from other machines or ob- Beware of fog, smoke or dust that obscure visibility. stacles to ensure required visibility conditions. Always inspect the working area to identify potential Always give way to loaded machines. risks such as: inclines, overhangs, trees, demolition Maintain a clear vision of the surroundings of the rubble, fires, ravines, steep slopes, rough terrain, travel or work area at all times. ditches, crowns, ridge trenches,diggings in traffic Keep cab windows clean and repaired. areas, crowded parking lots, crowded service areas, When pulling loads or towing through a cable or chain, fenced zones. In such conditions, proceed with ex- do not start suddenly at full throttle. Take-up slack treme care. carefully. Whenever possible, avoid crossing over obstacles Avoid kinking or twisting chains or cables. such as very rough terrain, rocks, logs, steps, Carefully inspect the towing items for flaws or prob- ditches, railroad tracks. When obstructions must lems before proceeding. be crossed, do so with extreme care and at a Do not pull through a kinked chain or cable as the square angle, if possible. Slow down. Ease up to high anomalous stresses existing in this condition may the break-over point, pass the balance point slowly induce failures in the kinked portion. and ease down the other side also using the at- Always wear heavy gloves when handling chains or tachment, if necessary. cables. To overcome deep trenches or sinking ground, Chains and cables should be securely anchored us- place the machine perpendicular to the obsta- ing suitable hooks. Anchor points should be strong cle, drastically reduce ground speed and start enough to withstand the expected load. crossing using also the attachment if necessary, Keep anyone clear of anchor points and cables or only after assessing that ground conditions al- chains. Do not pull or tow unless the operator’s low the traverse safely and without risks. compartments of the machines involved are prop- The gradient you may attempt to overcome is limited erly protected against possible backlash in case by factors such as ground conditions, load being han- of cable or chain failure or detachment. dled, machine type and speed, and visibility. Be alert of soft ground conditions close to newly There is no substitute for good judgement and experi- constructed walls. The fill material and machine ence when working on slopes. weight may cause the wall to collapse under Avoid operating the attachment too close to an over- the machine. hang or high wall, either above or below the machine. In darkness, check area of operation carefully Beware of caving edges, falling objects and land- before moving in with the machine. Use all lights slides. Remember that such hazards are likely to be provided. Do not move into low visibility areas. concealed by bushes, undergrowth and such. If the engine tends to slow down and stall for what- Avoid faggots, bushes, logs and rocks. Never drive ever reason under load or at idle, immediately report over them, nor over any other surface irregularities this problem to the maintenance managers for proper that discontinue adherence or traction with the ground, action. Do not operate the machine until this condi- especially near slopes or drop-offs. tion is corrected. Be alert to avoid changes in adherence conditions Regularly check all exhaust system components, as that could cause loss of control. Work with extreme exhaust fumes are toxic for the operator. care on ice or frozen ground and on stepped slopes Operators must know the performance of the ma- or near drop-offs. chine they are driving. The word “bulldozing” generally refers to work in When working on slopes or near sudden level drops virgin rough terrain, characterised by the presence in the terrain, pay attention not to lose adherence of all the perils and risks listed above. We empha- and avoid loose soft ground since overturn or loss of sise the danger represented in these conditions by machine control could result. large tree limbs (possibly falling on the machine)

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S1-3 GENERALITIES and large roots (which may act as a leverage un- Avoid travelling across slopes. Proceed from uphill der the machine when up-rooted and cause the unit downhill and vice-versa. If machine starts slipping to overturn). sideways when on a slope, lower the bucket and thrust Position the machine dependent upon the loading and bucket teeth into the ground. unloading areas in order to swing leftwards to load to Working on slopes is dangerous. Grade the working obtain best visibility. area if possible. Reduce work cycle time if it is not Never use the bucket or attachment as a man lift or possible to grade the working area. carry riders.Never use the machine as a work platform Do not move full bucket or a load from uphill downhill or scaffolding. The machine must not be improperly used as this would reduce machine stability. Do not work for works not consistent with its features (such as push- with the bucket turned to the uphill side. ing railway cars, trucks or other machines). Do not work with the bucket turned uphill as counter- Always pay attention to people within the machine weights protruding downhill would reduce machine operating range. stability on the slope and increase risk of overturn- Never move or stop the bucket, other loads or the ing. attachment above ground personnel or truck cabs. We recommend to work on slopes with the bucket Ensure the truck driver is in a safe place before load- downhill, after checking machine stability with the ing the truck. bucket empty and attachment retracted, by slowly Load trucks from side or rear. swinging the upper structure by 360°. Use only the type of bucket recommended consider- Position the carriage at a right angle relative to slopes, ing machine type, materials to be handled, material hanging walls, etc. to exit the working area easily. piling up and loading characteristics, ground type and Standard use, provides for the travel controls at the other typical conditions of the work to be performed. front and travel motors at the back. Should travel When transporting a loaded bucket, keep it as rolled- motors be positioned at the front with regard to the back as possible. Keep boom and arm as low as actual travel direction. Remind relative to travel direc- possible. tion that controls are reversed. Ground speed should be adequate to the load and Always check travel motor position before moving off. ground conditions. Properly judge ground conditions with particular at- The load must always be properly arranged in the tention to consistency of the area you are going to bucket; move with extreme care when transporting work on. oversize loads. Keep the machine sufficiently far from the ditch edge. Do not lift and move the bucket overhead where per- Never dig under the machine. sons are standing or working, nor downhill when work- Should it be necessary to dig under the machine, al- ing on a slope as this would decrease machine stabil- ways ensure that digging walls are opportunely ity. Load the bucket from the uphill side. propped up against landslide to prevent the machine Loads to be raised using the machine should be ex- from falling into the trench. clusively hooked to the hitch specially provided. Do not swing the upperstructure, raise the load or The excavator is no lifting and transportation means, brake abruptly if not required. This may cause acci- therefore it should not be used to position loads accu- dents. rately. Should it be exceptionally used to lift and lay Prior to beginning the work near gas distribution mains building components, special caution must be taken or other public utilities: as follows: - Contact the company owner of the gas mains or its - The machine must be equipped without failure with nearest branch before starting the work. Look up the appropriate variant supplied, upon request, by the number in the telephone directory. NEW HOLLAND KOBELCO. Also, totally comply - Define together which precautions should be taken with the safety precautions for the operation of the to guarantee work safety. excavator as a lifting equipment. - Decrease work speed. Reaction time could be too - Secure the loads to be raised using cables or chains slow and distance evaluation wrong. fastened with appropriate hooking mechanisms. - When working near gas mains or other public utili- - Nobody should be allowed to remain under the raised ties installations, appoint a person in charge of sig- load or within the excavator operating range for any nalling duties. This person will have the responsibil- reason whatever. ity of observing the machine, any part of it and/or Never exceed specified loading capacity. Incorrect fas- the load approaching the gas mains from a stand- tening of slings or chains may cause boom/arm fail- point more favourable than the Operator’s. This sig- ure or failure of the lifting means with consequent bodily nal man (flag-man) must be in direct communica- injuries and even death. tion with the Operator and the Operator must pay Always ensure that slings and chains used for lifting undivided attention to the signals supplied. are adequate to the load and in good condition. - The gas distributing Company, if previously advised All loading capacities are referred to the machine and involved in the work, as well as machine Opera- on a level surface and should be disregarded when tor, Owner and/or any natural person or legal entity working on a slope. having rent or leased the machine or being responsi-

Copyright © New Holland S1-4 E265-E305 GENERALITIES ble at the time by contract or by law, are liable for the STOPPING adoption of the necessary precautions. Working near electric lines can be very dangerous, When the machine is to be stopped for whatever reason, therefore some special precautions must be ob- always check that all controls are in the neutral position served. and that the safety lever is on the lock position to guaran- Within this Manual, “work near electric lines” means tee risk-free start-up. when the attachment or load raised by the excava- Never leave the machine unattended with the engine run- tor (in any position) may reach the minimum safety ning. distance established by local or international Safety Prior to leaving the driver’s seat, and after making Regulations. sure that all people are clear of the machine, slowly To work without risks, keep maximum possible dis- lower the attachment until resting it safely to the tance from electric lines and never trespass minimum ground. Retract possible auxiliary tools to the closed safety distance. safety position. - Contact the Company owner of the electric lines or Check that all controls are in the neutral position. Move its nearest branch before starting the work. engine controls to the shut-down position. Switch off Look up the in the telephone directory. the key-start switch. Consult the Operation and Main- - Define together with the Company representative tenance Instruction Manual. which precautions should be taken to guarantee work Park the machine in a non-operating and no-traffic area. safety. Park on firm level ground. If this is not possible, posi- - All electric lines should be considered as operative tion the machine at a right angle to the slope, making live lines even though it might be well known that sure there is no danger of uncontrolled sliding. the line in question is out of work and visibly con- If parking in traffic lanes cannot be avoided, provide nected to the ground. appropriate flags, barriers, flares and other signals as - The Electric Power Company, if previously advised required to adequately warn the oncoming drivers. and involved in the work, as well as machine Op- Always switch off the key-start switch before clean- erator, Owner and/or any natural person or legal ing, repairing, or parking the machine to prevent acci- entity having rent orleased the machine or being dental unauthorised start-up. responsible at the time by contract or by law, are Never lower the attachment or auxiliary tools other liable for the adoption of the necessary precautions. than from sitting in the operator’s seat. Sound the horn. - Decrease work speed. Reaction time could be too Make sure that nobody is within the machine operat- slow and distance evaluation wrong. ing range. Lower the attachment slowly. - Warn all ground personnel to keep clear of the ma- Securely block and lock the machine every time you chine and/or load at all times. If the load has to be leave it unattended. Return keys to the safe place guided down for laying, consult the Electric Power previously agreed upon. Perform all necessary opera- Company to know which precautions should be tions for stopping as detailed in the Operation and taken. Maintenance Instruction Manual. - Appoint a person in charge of signalling duties. Drive the machine far from pits, trenches, rocky hang- This person will have the responsibility of observ- ing walls, areas with overhead electric lines, and slopes ing the machine, any part of it and/or the load ap- before stopping it at the end of the working day. proaching the electric lines from a standpoint more Align the upperstructure to the tracks in order to allow favourable than the Operator’s. This signal man (flag- to easily get on and off the driver’s compartment. man) must be in direct communication with the Move all controls to the position specified for machine Operator and the Operator must pay undivided at- stopping. Refer the Operation and Maintenance In- tention to the signals supplied. struction Manual. When working in or near pits, in ditches or very high Never park on an incline without accurately blocking walls, check that the walls are sufficiently propped up the machine to prevent unexpected movement. to avoid cave-in hazards. Follow stopping instructions contained in the Opera- Pay the utmost attention when working near overhang tion and Maintenance Instruction Manual. walls or where landslides may take place. Make sure that the support surface is strong enough to prevent landslides. When digging, there is the risk of cave-ins and land- slides. MAINTENANCE Always check ground conditions and conditions of the material to be removed. Support everywhere it is re- GENERALITIES quired to prevent possible cave-ins or landslides when: - digging near previous trenches filled with material Carefully read the Operation and Maintenance Instruc- - digging in bad ground conditions tion Manual before starting, operating, maintaining, - digging trenches subject to vibration from railroads, fuelling or servicing the machine in any manner. working machines or highway traffic. Read all safety plates mounted on the machine and

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S1-5 GENERALITIES observe instructions they contain before starting, op- When service or maintenance require access to ar- erating, repairing, fuelling or servicing the machine. eas that cannot be reached from the ground, use a Do not allow unauthorised personnel to repair or serv- ladder or step platform conforming to local or national ice the machine. regulations to reach the working area. If such means Follow all recommended maintenance and service are not available, use machine grab rails and steps. procedures. Always perform all service or maintenance work with Do not wear rings, wrist watches, jewellery, loose or the greatest care and attention. hanging garments, such as ties, torn clothing, Shop and/or field service platforms or ladders should scarves, unbuttoned or unzipped jackets that can get be manufactured and maintained in accordance with caught in moving parts. Wear certified safety clothes local or national safety regulations in force. such as: hard hat, no-slip footwear, heavy gloves, ear Disconnect batteries and label all controls to warn that protection, safety glasses, reflector vests, respirators service work is in progress, according to local and when required. Ask your employer about safety regu- national safety regulation requirements lations in force and protective equipment. Block the machine and all attachments to be raised Do not use controls or hoses as hand holds. Hoses according to local and national safety regulation re- and controls are movable parts and do not provide quirements. solid support. Besides, controls may be inadvert- Do not check or fill fuel tanks or install batteries near ently moved and cause unexpected movement of the burning or smoking materials and open flames due to machine or its attachments. the presence of flammable vapours. Do not jump on or off the machine. Always keep both The fuel filler pipe nozzle must be constantly kept in hands and one foot, or both feet and one hand in contact with the filler neck and this even before fuel contact with steps and/or grab rails. starts flowing in. Keep this contact from the begin- Never service the machine with someone sitting in ning to the end of the fuelling operation to avoid pos- the driver’s seat, unless this person is an authorised sible generation of sparks due to static electricity. operator assisting in the maintenance being carried Use a truck or trailer to haul a failed machine. Should out. it be necessary to tow it, provide for suitable danger Keep the operator’s compartment, step plates, grab signals as required by the local norms and regula- rails and handles clear of foreign objects, oil, grease, tions and observe recommendations given in the Op- mud orsnow to minimise the danger of slipping or stum- eration and Maintenance Instruction Manual. Load/ bling. unload the machine on firm level ground providing safe Clean mud or grease from your shoes before climbing support to the wheels of the truck or trailer. Use strong on the machine or driving it. access ramps, with adequate height and angle. Keep Never attempt to operate the machine or its attach- the trailer flatbed free of mud, oil or slippery materi- ments from any position other than sitting in the op- als. Tie the machine securely to the trailer and block erator’s seat. carriages and upperstructure. Keep the driver’s seat free from foreign objects, espe- Never align holes or slots using your fingers; cially if these are not secured. alwaysuse appropriate aligning tools. Should it be necessary to move the attachment for Remove all sharp edges and burrs from re-worked maintenance purposes, do not raise or lower the at- parts. tachment from any other position than sitting in the Use only approved and effectively grounded auxiliary operator’s seat. Before starting the machine or mov- power sources for heaters, battery chargers, pumps ing its attachment, sound the horn and require that and similar equipment to reduce electrical shock haz- nobody remains near the machine. ard. Raise the attachment slowly. Lift and handle heavy components using hoisting de- Always lock all moving components or parts of the vices of appropriate capacity. Ensure the parts are machine that must be lifted for maintenance purposes supported by appropriate straps and hooks. using adequate external means as required by local Use lifting eyes provided to this aim. and national regulations. Do not allow anyone to pass Pay attention to bystanders near the lifting area. or stay near or below a raised attachment. If you are Never pour gasoline or diesel fuel into open contain- not absolutely sure about your safety, do not stay or ers. Never use gasoline, solvents or other flammable walk under a raised attachment. fluids to clean parts. Use proprietary certified non- Do not place head, body, limbs, hands, feet or fingers flammable, non-toxic solvents only. near articulated cutting edges deprived of the neces- When using compressed air to clean parts, wear safety sary guards, unless they are suitably and safely glasses with side shields. Limit pressure to max. 2 locked. bars, in accordance with local and national safety regu- Never lubricate, repair or adjust the machine with the lations in force. engine running, except when this is specifically re- Do not run the engine of this machine in closed build- quired by the Operation and Maintenance Instruction ings without proper forced ventilation capable to re- Manual. move toxic exhaust gases concentrating in the air. Do not wear loose clothing, jewellery near rotating parts. Do not smoke, nor allow open flames or sparks nearby

Copyright © New Holland S1-6 E265-E305 GENERALITIES while refuelling the unit or handling highly flammable arc-cutting. Wear dark safety glasses when you are materials. near a welding in progress. Do not look the welding Do not use open flames as light sources to look for arc without proper eye protection. leaks or inspect anywhere on the machine. Become acquainted with all your jacking equipment Make sure that all mechanical tools provided are in and their capacity. good condition at all times. Never use tools with mush- Ensure that the jacking point on the machine is ap- roomed or damaged heads. Always wear eye protec- propriate for the load applied. Also, be sure the sup- tions with side shields. ports under the jack and between the jack and the Move with extreme care when working under, on or machine are appropriate and stable. near the machine or its attachments. Any equipment supported by a jack represents a pos- In case of attachment tests during which the engine sible hazard. Always support the load onto appropri- should be kept running, a qualified operator must sit ate blocking means as a safety measure before pro- in the driver’s seat at all times while the mechanic is ceeding with service or maintenance work, in compli- at work. ance with local or national safety regulations. Keep hands and clothes far OFF moving parts. Metal cables produce steel splinters. Always wear Stop the engine and move the safey lever to the lock certified protection clothes such as safety gloves and position before starting adjusting or repairing an as- glasses while handling them. sembly. Do not use makeshift jacks to adjust track sag. Fol- Do not carry out any work on the attachment without low instructions given in the Repair Manual. prior authorisation. Observe maintenance and repair Handle all parts carefully. Keep hands and fingers procedures. away from gaps, gears, and similar. Always use and In case of field service, move the machine to level wear certified safety clothes such as safety glasses, ground and block it. If work on an incline cannot be gloves and footwear. avoided, securely block the machine and its attach- The attachment is kept constantly in position by an ments. Move the machine to level ground as soon as oil column trapped into the high pressure circuit. Lower possible. Do not twist chains and cables. Never use a the attachment to the ground and relieve pressure from twisted chain or cable for lifting or pulling. Always wear all circuits prior to carrying out any type of mainte- safety gloves to handle chains or cables. nance or repair work. Be sure chains and cables are firmly fastened and Do not service or repair the machine if it is parked that the anchor point is strong enough to withstand downhill. If this is unavoidable, in case of emergency, the expected load. Keep all bystanders clear of the block the carriages to prevent unexpected movement, anchor point, cables or chains. Do not pull or tow particularly if the work is to be carried out on the final unless the operator’s compartments of the ma- reduction units or travel motors. chines involved are fitted with proper guards Consult the Operation and Maintenance Instruction against cable or chain backlash. Manual for correct maintenance procedure. Keep the maintenance area clean and dry at all times. Areas near articulated cutting edges where mechani- Clean immediately all water and oil spillage. cal parts are in motion are where personal injuries are Do not pile up oily or greasy rags as they represent a most likely to occur. Pay attention to prevent possible major fire hazard. Always store them in closed metal part movements by means of blocks or by keeping containers. clear of such zones when motion may take place dur- Before starting the machine or its attachment, check, ing maintenance or repair. adjust and lock the operator’s seat. Also ensure that Move the hydraulic system lock safety lever to the nobody is within the machine or attachment operating lock position when stopping the machine for what- range before starting or operating the machine and/or ever reason. its attachments. Always install the safety stays for the hood and other Sound the horn. hinged covers before performing any maintenance or Rust inhibitors are volatile and flammable. repair work in the engine compartment. Prepare parts in well ventilated areas. Keep open flames away. Do not smoke. Store containers in a cool well venti- lated place where they could not be reached by unau- thorised people. TRANSFERS AND TRANSPORTATION Do not carry loose objects in your pockets that might fall unnoticed into open compartments. Before moving or transporting the machine, block Wear appropriate safety clothing such as hard hat, upperstructure swing to prevent accidental move- safety shoes and gloves, safety glasses when splin- ment. ters or other particles may be ejected. Pay particular attention during transfer on inclines, Wear the appropriate welder’s equipment such as dark both uphill and downhill. Keep the bucket in a posi- safety glasses or mask, hard hat, protective clothing, tion to provide a possible anchor point into the safety gloves and footwear always while welding or ground in case of slipping.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S1-7 GENERALITIES During transfers on inclines, both uphill and downhill, Do not lubricate the machine with the engine running. keep the upperstructure aligned with the carriages. Do not run the engine with the air intakes open and Do not travel across the slope. not protected. If this cannot be avoided for service Never transfer the machine in the working site, in a reasons, place protection meshes on all intakes be- crowded area, or near people without having at least fore servicing the engine. one person charged with hand-signals who could guide the Operator. Sound the horn to inform that you are about to move off. It is necessary to know load limits of bridges and di- mensional limits of tunnels. Such limits must never ELECTRICAL SYSTEM be exceeded. You should also know machine height, width, and weight. Have a signal-man help you when Pay attention to connect connecting cables to cor- clearances are limited. rect poles (+ to +) and (- to -) at both ends. Do not Check distance between boom/arm and dimensional short-circuit terminals. Thoroughly follow instruc- limits during transfer or transportation. tions given in Operation and Maintenance Instruc- Rough terrain may cause the machine to sway and tion Manual. roll to such an extent that boom/arm could get to con- Always move the key-start switch in the lock posi- tact electric lines or other obstacles. Cross obstacles tion before servicing or repairing the machine. at a right angle at low speed. Pay attention to ma- Batteries contain SULPHURIC ACID. Protect the chine shaking when the centre of gravity overcomes eyes when working near the batteries against pos- the obstacle. sible sprays of the acid solution. Should acid con- Keep the bucket down at all times during transfers. tact skin, eyes, or clothes, RINSE IMMEDIATELY Drive with the lights on and use appropriate signals IN WATER FOR AT LEAST 15 MINUTES. Immedi- and flags. ately seek medical attention. Get to know and respect local and national regula- Battery released gas is highly flammable. Leave tions. the battery compartment cover open during recharg- Consider boom/arm and upperstructure dimensions ing to improve ventilation. Never check battery while turning. charge by placing metal objects across the posts. Use a ramp to load the machine on a trailer. If a ramp Keep sparks or open flames away from batteries. is not available, fabricate one using blocks. The ramp Do not smoke near the battery to prevent explo- should be sufficiently strong to support machine sion hazard. weight. Always load and unload on level surface. Before any maintenance or repair, make sure that Tow the machine following the instructions contained there are no fuel or electrolyte leaks from the bat- in the Operation and Maintenance Instruction Manual. teries. If any, correct prior to proceeding with fur- ther work. Do not recharge batteries in confined spaces. Ensure proper ventilation is provided to avoid accidental explosions due to build-up of ex- plosive gas released during charging. ENGINE Disconnect batteries before working on the electri- cal system or carrying out any other type of work. Do not run the engine in closed buildings without proper ventilation capable to remove harmful exhaust fumes. Do not place head, body, limbs, feet, hands or fingers near rotating fans or belts. Be especially careful near blower fans. HYDRAULIC SYSTEM Loosen the radiator cap very slowly to relieve system pressure before removing it. Always top-up coolant Pressure fluid escaping from a very small hole can level with the engine off or idling if hot. See the Op- be almost invisible and still have sufficient force to eration and Maintenance Instruction Manual. penetrate the skin. Always check any suspected Keep the exhaust manifold and tube free from com- pressure leaks using a piece of cardboard or wood. bustible matters. Fit the machine with shields and Do not use hands. If injured by escaping fluid, ob- guards when working in the presence of combustible tain medical attention immediately or serious in- matter free in the air. fection or reaction may develop.Stop the engine Do not refuel with the engine running, especially if and ensure pressure is relieved from all systems hot, as this increases fire hazard in case of fuel spill- before removing side panels, housings, guards and age. covers. See the Operation and Maintenance In- Never attempt to check or adjust fan belt tensions struction Manual. when the engine is running. Always use gauges of adequate capacity for pres- Do not adjust the fuel injection pump when the ma- sure testing. Refer to the Operation and Mainte- chine is operating. nance Instruction Manual or Repair Manual.

Copyright © New Holland S1-8 E265-E305 GENERALITIES TOOLS ting in the driver’s seat. Sound the horn before start- ing the machine or moving the attachment. Require Always keep head, body, limbs, feet, hands, and fin- that nobody remain near the machine. Raise the at- gers away from the bucket and attachments, when in tachment slowly. the raised position. Do not use the machine to transport loose objects, Prior to any maintenance or repair work, install all unless proper securing devices are provided. supports necessary to this aim according to local and Never use gases other than nitrogen to charge the national safety regulations. accumulators. In case the attachment is to be operated for mainte- Refer to the Operation and Maintenance Instruction nance or repair purposes, do so exclusively while sit- Manual.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-1 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS RECOGNISE SAFETY INFORMATION • This is your SAFETY ALERT SYMBOL. - When you see this symbol on your machine or in this Manual, be alert of the potential for personal injury. - Follow recommended precautions and safe oper- ating practices. S0021 UNDERSTAND SIGNAL WORDS • In this Manual you will find the following words: - DANGER; - WARNING; - CAUTION. Referring to different hazard risks. DANGER These words are always accompanied by the safety alert symbol. DANGER: Indicates an imminent hazardous situation WARNING which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury. CAUTION WARNING: Indicated a potential hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury. IMPORTANT CAUTION: Indicates a potential hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury. NOTE IMPORTANT: Indicates a situation which, if not avoided, may cause damage to the machine. NOTE: Indicates an additional explanation for informa- tion purposes. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION • This Manual also contains this symbol accompany- ing instructions for correct behaviour as regards environmental protection. S0024

Copyright © New Holland S2-2 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS FOLLOW SAFETY PRECAUTIONS • Carefully read and observe all safety signs on the machine and read all safety precautions in this Manual. • Safety signs should be installed, maintained, and replaced when necessary. - If a safety sign or this Manual are damaged or missing, obtain a replacement from your NEW HOLLAND KOBELCO Dealer in the same way you order a spare part (be sure to detail machine model and serial number upon ordering). • Learn how to operate the machine and its controls correctly and safely. • Allow only trained, qualified, authorised personnel to S0022 operate the machine. • Keep the machine in proper working conditions. - Unauthorised changes to the machine may impair function and/or safety and affect machine life. • Safety messages in this Chapter “SAFETY PRE- CAUTIONS”, are intended to illustrate basic safety procedures of the machine. However, it is impossi- ble for these safety messages to cover every hazardous situation you may encounter. If you have any doubts, consult your direct supervisor prior to operating or servicing the machine. PREPARE FOR EMERGENCIES • Be prepared if a fire starts or an accident occurs. - Keep the first-aid kit and fire extinguisher on hand. - Thoroughly read and understand the label at- tached to the fire extinguisher to use it properly. - Establish emergency priority procedures to cope with fires and accidents. - Keep emergency numbers for doctors, ambulance service, hospitals and fire department posted near the telephone. S0023

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-3 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS WEAR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING • Wear close-fitting clothing and safety equipment appropriate to the job. You need: - A hard hat; - Safety shoes; - Safety glasses or face shield; - Heavy gloves; - Ear protection; - Reflective clothing; - Waterproof clothing; - Respirator or filter mask. Be sure to correctly wear equipment and clothing for the job. - Do not take any chances. S0025 - Avoid wearing loose clothing, jewellery, or other items that can catch on control levers or other parts of the machine. • Operating equipment safely requires the full atten- tion of the operator. Do not wear radio or music headphones while operating the machine. PROTECT AGAINST NOISE • Prolonged exposure to loud noise can cause impair- ment or loss of hearing. - Wear a suitable hearing protection such as ear- muffs or earplugs to protect objectionable or un- comfortably loud noise. S0026 INSPECT THE MACHINE • Inspect the machine carefully every day or work- shift by an attentive visual inspection of machine outside prior to starting it to prevent damages and personal injuries. - In the walk-around inspection, be sure to cover all points detailed in the Chapter "MAINTENANCE", paragraph "EXTERNAL VISUAL INSPECTION" of the OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE IN- S0027 STRUCTION MANUAL.

Copyright © New Holland S2-4 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS USE HAND HOLDS AND STEPS • Falling is one of the major causes of personal injury. - When you get on and off the machine, always face the machine and maintain a three-point contact with the steps and handrails. - Do not use any control as a handhold. - Never jump off the machine. Never get on and off a moving machine. S0028 - Be careful of slippery conditions of platforms, steps, and handrails when leaving the machine. ADJUST THE OPERATOR'S SEAT • A seat poorly adjusted for operator or work require- ments may quickly fatigue the operator leading to improper operations. - The seat should be adjusted whenever machine operator changes. - The operator should be able to fully press the pedals and correctly move the control levers with his back resting against the seat back. - If not, move the seat fore and aft, and check again. S0029

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-5 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS FASTEN SEAT BELT • Should the machine overturn, the operator may become injured and/or thrown from the cab. Not only, the operator may be crushed by the overturning machine resulting in serious injury or even death. - Prior to operating the machine, thoroughly examine belt webbing, buckle, and attaching hardware. If any item is damaged or worn, replace the seat belt or component before operating the machine. S0030 - Be sure to remain seated with the seat belt securely fastened at all times when the machine is in operation to minimise injury hazard in case of accident. - After a significant accident, replace the seat belts even though they do not look damaged. MOVE AND OPERATE MACHINE SAFELY • Bystanders can be run over. - Pay the utmost attention not to run over bystand- ers. - Be sure and aware of the location of bystanders before moving, swinging or operating the machine. - If fitted, keep the travel alarm and horn sounding to warn people that the machine is about to move. - When operating, swinging, or moving the machine S0031 in a congested area use a signal man. - Co-ordinate hand signals before starting the machine.

Copyright © New Holland S2-6 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS OPERATE ONLY FROM THE DRIVER'S SEAT • Inappropriate engine starting procedures may cause the machine unexpected movement, possibly resulting in serious injury and even death. - Start the engine only from the operator’s seat. - NEVER start the engine while standing on the track or on the ground. - Do not start the engine by shorting across starter motor terminals. - Before starting the engine, ensure that all control levers are in the neutral position. S0032 KEEP RIDERS OFF THE MACHINE • Riders on the machine are subject to injuries such as being struck by foreign objects and being thrown off the machine. - Only machine operator is allowed on the machine. Keep riders off. - Riders also obstruct the operator’s visibility, resulting in the machine being operated unsafely. S0033 CONFIRM DIRECTION WHERE THE MACHINE IS TO BE DRIVEN • Incorrect travel controls operation may result in serious injury and even death. - Before driving the machine, be aware of the undercarriage position relative to the operator’s position. If travel motors are located at the front of the cab, the machine will move reverse when travel controls are moved towards cab front. S0037

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-7 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AVOID INJURY FROM BACK-OVER AND SWING ACCIDENTS • If any person is present near the machine when backing or swinging the upperstructure, the machine may hit or run over that person, resulting in serious injury or death. • To avoid back-over and swing accidents: - Always look around BEFORE YOU BACK UP AND SWING THE MACHINE. BE SURE THAT ALL BYSTANDERS ARE CLEAR. - Keep the travel alarm in working condition (if equipped). - ALWAYS BE ALERT FOR BYSTANDERS S0042 MOVING INTO THE WORK AREA. USE THE HORN OR OTHER SIGNAL TO WARN BYSTANDERS BEFORE MOVING MACHINE. - USE A SIGNAL PERSON WHEN BACKING UP IF YOUR VIEW IS OBSTRUCTED. ALWAYS KEEP THE SIGNAL PERSON IN VIEW. - Use hand signals, which conform to your local regulations, when work conditions require a signal person. S0043 - No machine motions shall be made unless signals are clearly understood by both signalman and operator. - Learn the meanings of all flags, signs, and markings used on the job and confirm with the person in charge of signalling. - Keep windows, mirrors, and lights clean and in good condition. - Dust, heavy rain, fog, etc., can reduce visibility. As visibility decreases, reduce speed and use proper lighting. - Read and understand all operating instructions in the OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE IN- STRUCTION MANUAL.

Copyright © New Holland S2-8 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DRIVE MACHINE SAFELY • Before starting the machine carefully read the OP- ERATION AND MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTION MANUAL. (Refer to the OPERATING INSTRUC- TIONS chapter). • Before moving the machine, confirm which way to move travel pedals/levers for the corresponding direction you wish to go. - Pushing down on the front of the travel pedals or S0038 pushing the levers forward moves the machine towards the idlers. (Refer to the OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTION MANUAL). • Traveling on a grade may cause the machine to slip or to overturn, possibly resulting in serious injury or death. - When traveling up or down a grade, keep the bucket in the direction of travel, approximately 20 to 30 cm (A) above the ground. - If machine starts to skid or becomes unstable, lower the bucket immediately. S0039 - Traveling across the face of a slope may cause the machine to skid or to overturn. When travelling (ascending/descending) on a slope, be sure to point the tracks uphill/downhill. - Turning on an incline may cause the machine to tip over. If turning on an incline is absolutely unavoid- S0004 able, do so at a place where the slope is gentle and the surface is firm. - When operating on a grade and the fuel reserve indicator light lights, immediately refuel. WRONG S0005

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-9 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AVOID OVERTURNING • The danger of tipping is always present when operating on a grade, possibly resulting in serious injury or death. • To avoid tipping: - Be extra careful before operating on a grade. - Prepare machine operating area flat by grading. - Keep the bucket low to the ground and close to the machine. - Reduce machine operating speed to avoid tipping or slipping. - Avoid changing direction when travelling on S0002 grades. - NEVER attempt to travel across a grade steeper than 15 degrees. - Reduce swing speed as necessary when swinging loads. • Be careful when working on frozen ground. - Temperature increases will cause the ground to become soft and make ground travel unstable. S0047 PARK MACHINE SAFELY • To avoid accidents: - Park machine on a level surface. - Lower bucket to the ground. - Turn auto-idle (A/I) switch off. - Run engine at slow idle speed without load for 5 minutes. - Turn key-start switch to OFF to stop engine. - Remove the ignition key from the key switch. - Pull the safety lever (pilot-control shut-off lever) to the LOCK position. - Close windows, roof window, and cab door. - Lock all access doors and compartments. S0049

Copyright © New Holland S2-10 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AVOID INJURY FROM UNEXPECTED MACHINE MOVEMENT • Death or serious injury may result if you attempt to get on or off a moving machine. • To avoid roll-aways: - Select level ground when possible to park machine. - Do not park the machine on a grade. - Lower the bucket and/or other work tools to the ground. Thrust the bucket teeth into the ground if you must park on a grade. - Turn the auto-idle switch off. - Run the engine at slow idle speed without load for S0040 5 minutes to cool down the engine. - Stop the engine and remove the key from the key switch. - Pull the pilot shut-off lever to LOCK position. - Block both tracks. - Position the machine to prevent overturning. - Park a reasonable distance from other machines. S0041 PROVIDE SIGNALS FOR JOBS INVOLVING A NUMBER OF MACHINES • For jobs involving several machines, provide signals commonly known by all personnel involved. Also, appoint a signal person to co-ordinate the job site. Make sure that all personnel obey the signal per- son’s directions. S0036

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-11 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS INVESTIGATE JOB SITE BEFORE HAND • When working at the edge of an excavation or on a road shoulder, the machine could overturn, possibly resulting in serious injury or death. - Investigate the configuration and ground condi- tions of the job site beforehand to prevent the machine from overturning and prevent the ground, stockpiles, or banks from collapsing. - Make a work plan. Use machines appropriate to the work and job site. - Reinforce ground, edges, and road shoulders as necessary. Keep the machine well back from the edges of excavations and road shoulders. - When working on an incline or road shoulder, S0034 employ a signal person as required. Confirm that your machine is equipped with a F.O.P.S. (Falling Object Protective Structure) cab before working in areas where there is the possibility of falling stones or landslides. - When footing is weak, reinforce the ground before starting the work. - When working on frozen ground, be extremely alert. As ambient temperature rises, footing be- comes loose and slipped. PROTECT AGAINST FALLING STONES AND LANDSLIDES • Confirm that your machine is equipped with a F.O.P.S. (Falling Object Protective Structure) cab before working in areas where there is the possibility of falling stones. S0035

Copyright © New Holland S2-12 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DIG WITH CAUTION • Accidental severing of underground cables or gas lines may cause an explosion and/or fire, possibly resulting in serious injury or death. - Before digging, check the location of cables, gas lines, and water lines. - Keep the minimum distance required by law from cables, gas lines, and water lines. If a fiber optic cable should be accidentally severed, do not look into the end. Doing so may result in serious eye injury. - Contact local authorities and/or the utility compa- nies directly (electric power, gas, telephone, wa- ter, sewers, telecommunications, etc.) to obtain information about underground utility lines. S0009 OPERATE WITH CAUTION • If the front attachment or any other part of the machine hits against an overhead obstacle, such as a bridge, both the machine and the overhead obstacle will be damaged, and personal injury may results as well. - Take care to avoid hitting overhead obstacles with the boom or arm. S0008 AVOID ELECTRIC LINES • Serious injury or death can result if the machine or front attachments are not kept a safe distance from electric lines. L - When operating near an electric line, NEVER move any part of the machine or load closer than 5 m plus twice the line insulator length (L). - Check and comply with any local regulations that may apply. - Wet ground will expand the area that could cause any person on it to be affected by electric shock. - Keep all bystanders or co-workers away from the site. S0205

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-13 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS KEEP PERSONNEL CLEAR FROM WORKING AREA • A person may be hit severely by the swinging front attachment or counterweight and/or may be crushed against an other object, resulting in serious injury or death. - Keep all persons clear from the area of operation and machine movement. - Before operating the machine, set up barriers to the sides and rear area of the bucket swing radius to prevent anyone from entering the work area. S0044 NEVER MOVE THE BUCKET OVER ANY ONE • Never lift, move, or swing bucket above anyone or a truck cab. Serious injury or machine damage may result due to bucket load spill or due to collision with the bucket. S0045 AVOID UNDERCUTTING • In order to retreat from the edge of an excavation if the footing should collapse, always position the undercarriage perpendicular to the edge of the exca- vation with the travel motors at the rear. - If the footing starts to collapse and if sufficient retreat is not possible, do not panic. Often, the machine can be secured by lowering the front attachment, in such cases. S0011

Copyright © New Holland S2-14 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS NEVER UNDERCUT A HIGH BANK • The edges could collapse or a land slide could occur causing serious injury or death. S0048 SAFETY LOADS MOVING • The excavator is no lifting and transportation means, therefore it should not be used to position loads accurately. Should it be exceptionally used to lift and lay building components, special caution must be taken as follows: - The machine must be equipped without failure with the appropriate variant supplied, upon request, by NEW HOLLAND KOBELCO. Also, totally comply with the safety precautions for the operation of the excavator as a lifting equipment. - Secure the loads to be raised using cables or chains fastened with appropriate hooking mecha- nisms. - Never hook cables or chains to the bucket teeth. - Nobody should be allowed to remain under the raised load or within the excavator operating range for any reason whatever. - Never exceed specified loading capacity. Incor- rect fastening of slings or chains may cause boom/arm failure or failure of the lifting means with consequent bodily injuries and even death. S0165 - Always ensure that slings and chains used for lifting are adequate to the load and in good condi- tion. - All loading capacities are referred to the ma- chine on a level surface and should be disre- garded when working on a slope.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-15 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS SAFETY TRANSPORTING • The danger of tipping is present when loading/ unloading the machine onto/from a truck or trailer bed. - Be sure to observe local regulations when transporting the machine on public roads. - Provide an appropriate truck or trailer for transporting the machine. • Take the following precautions when loading/ unloading the machine: 1. Select firm level ground. 2. Be sure to use a loading dock or ramp. 3. Be sure to have a signal person when loading/ S0052 unloading the machine. 4. Always turn the auto-idle (A/I) switch OFF when loading or unloading the machine, to avoid unexpected speed increase due to unintention- al operation of a control lever. 5. Always select the slow speed mode with the travel speed selector. In the high speed mode, travel speed may automatically increase. 6. Avoid steering while driving up or down the ramp as it is extremely dangerous. If steering is unavoidable, first move back to the ground or flatbed, modify travelling direction, and begin to drive again. 7. Do not operate any levers besides the travel levers when driving up or down the ramp. 8. The top end of the ramp where it meets the flatbed is a sudden jolt. Take care when traveling over it. 9. Prevent possible injury from machine tipping while the upperstructure is rotating. 10. Keep the arm tucked under and rotate the upperstructure slowly for best stability. 11. Securely fasten machine frame using chains or cables. Refer to “TRANSPORT” chapter in the OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE IN- STRUCTION MANUAL for details.

Copyright © New Holland S2-16 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS SAFE MAINTENANCE • To avoid accidents: - Understand maintenance procedure before starting the work. - Kepp the working area clean and dry. - Do not spray water or steam inside the cab. - Do not lubricate or service the machine when it is in motion. - Kepp hands, feet and clothes far from moving parts. Prior to service in the machine: 1. Park the machine on the level ground. 2. Lower the bucket to the ground. 3. Switch off the Auto-Idle (A/I). 4. Let the engine idle with no load for at least five minutes until it has cooled down. 5. Move the key-start switch to the OFF position to stop the engine. S0053 6. Remove the ignition key from the start switch. 7. Apply the "Maintenance in progress" tag . This tag can be applied o the left-hand control lever, safety lever or cab door. 8. Move the safety lever (pilot-control shut-off lever) to the LOCK position. 9. Let the engine cool down. - Do not leave the machine unattended if servicing requires the engine running . - If the machine is to be raised, place boom and arm at an angle 90 to 110°. Lock machine components which should be raised for maintenance or repair using suitable supporting means. - Never work under a machine kept raised by the boom. - Inspect certain component regularly, repair or S0054 replace as necessary. Refer to the OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTION MANUAL. - Keep all components in good condition and properly install. Immediately repair any fault. - Immediately repair any damage.Replace worn or failed components. Remove grease, oil, debris build-ups. - Disconnect the negative cable (-) from the battery before carry out any work on the electrical system or arc-welding on the machine.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-17 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS WARN OTHERS OF SERVICE WORK • Unexpected machine movement can cause serious injury. - Before performing any work on the machine, attach a maintenance in progress tag. This tag can be applied o the left-hand control lever, safety lever or cab door. S0055 SUPPORT MACHINE PROPERLY • Never attempt to work on the machine without securing the machine first. - Always lower the attachment or tool to the ground before working on the machine. - If you must work on a lifted machine or attach- ment, securely support the machine or attach- ment. - Do not support the machine on cinder blocks, bollow tires, or props that may crumble under continuous load. - Do not work under a machine that is supported S0054 solely by a jack. STAY CLEAR OF MOVING PARTS • Entanglements in moving parts can cause serious injury. • To prevent accidents, care should be taken to ensure that hands, feet, clothing, jewelry and hair do not become entangled when working near rotating parts. S0056

Copyright © New Holland S2-18 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DISPOSE OF WASTE IN THE APPROPRIATE MANNER • Waste improperly disposed of represents a danger for the envinronment. Potentially dangerous waste used on the NEW HOLLAND KOBELCO excavators includes lubricants, fuel, coolant, brake fluid, filters and batteries. - Used sealed containers when discharging fluids. Do not use containers for food or beverages which may induce drinking. - Do not spill waste over the ground, into drains, or water beds. S0064 - Obtain information about the correct methods to recycle or dispose of waste from local Authorities, collection centres or your Dealer. WORK IN A CLEAN AREA • Before starting an operation, clean the working area. Clear the area from all the objects that can be dangerous for mechanics or people in the working area. S0166 PROPERLY LIGHT THE WORKING AREA • Properly and safely light the working area. - Use safe portable lamps in order to work inside and under the machine. - Make sure that the lamp is shielded by a cage; the incandescent filament of a lamp, accidentally broken, can cause fuel or oil fire. S0167

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-19 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS REGULARLY WASH THE MACHINE • Remove all the traces of grease, oil and deposits, in order to avoid people accidents or damages to things. - Do not spray water or steam in the cab. S0153 STORE ATTACHMENTS SAFELY • Stored attachments such as buckets, hydraulic breakers and blades can fall and cause serious injury or death. - Securely store attachments and implements to prevent falling. - Keep bystanders away from storage areas. S0058 PREVENT ACID SCALDS • The sulphuric acid, contained in the battery, is poisonous. It is strong enough to scald the skin, corrode clothes and cause blindness, if it is sprayed into the eyes. To avoid dangers: - Fill the batteries in airy areas. - Wear eye protections and rubber gloves. - Avoid breathing the electrolyte vapours when topping up. - Avoid spilling or dripping the electrolyte. - Use proper emergency starting techniques. If you are touched with acid sprays: - Rinse your skin well with water. - Put on your skin sodium bicarbonate or clay to S0168 help the acid neutralization. - Rinse your eyes with water for 10-15 minutes. - Immediately see a doctor. If you have swallowed the acid: - Drink a big quantity of water or milk, swallow milk of magnesia, scrabbled ‘eggs or vegetal oil. - Immediately see a doctor.

Copyright © New Holland S2-20 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS STARTING THE ENGINE WITH BOOSTER BATTERIES • Battery gas may explode causing serious damages and injuries. - If the engine is to be started using booster batteries, ensure to comply with all procedures detailed in the chapter “OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS” of the OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTION MANUAL. - The operator should be sitting in the driver’s seat to keep the machine under control when the engine starts. Starting the engine with booster batteries is a two man operation. S0001 - Do not use batteries that have been stored in the cold for a long time. - Mistakes in following procedures detailed for starting the engine with slave batteries may cause the batteries to explode or machine to move unexpectedly. PREVENT BATTERY EXPLOSIONS • Battery gas can explode. - Keep sparks, lighted matches, and flames away from the top of battery. - Never check battery charge by placing a metal object across the posts. Use a voltmeter or hydrometer. - Do not charge a frozen battery; it may explode. Warm battery to 16 °C. • Battery electrolyte is poisonous. If the battery S0001 should explode, battery electrolyte may be splashed into eyes, possibly resulting in blindness. - Be sure to wear eye protection when checking electrolyte specific gravity.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-21 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS PREVENT BURNS Hot spraying fluids: • After operation, engine coolant is hot and under pressure. Hot water or steam is contained in the engine, radiator and heater lines. Skin contact with escaping hot water or steam can cause severe burns. - To prevent possible injury from hot spraying water. Do not remove the radiator cap until the engine is cool. When opening, turn the cap slowly to the stop. Allow all pressure to be released before removing the cap. S0019 - The hydraulic oil tank is pressurized. Again, be sure to release all pressure before removing the cap. Hot fluids and surfaces: • Engine oil, reduction gear oil and hydraulic oil also become hot during operation. The engine, hoses, lines and other parts become hot as well. - Wait for the oil and components to cool down before starting any maintenance or inspection work. S0059 KEEP CLEAN THE MACHINE Keep clean the engine compartment, radiator, batteries, hydraulic pipes, fuel tank and operator's position. The engine compartment temperature can quickly rise, after stopping the engine. IN THESE CASES, BE CAREFUL TO POSSIBLE FIRES. Open the access doors in order to quicken the engine cooling process and clean the compartment. S0177

Copyright © New Holland S2-22 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AVOID HIGH-PRESSURE FLUIDS • Fluids such as diesel fuel or hydraulic oil under pressure can penetrate the skin or eyes causing serious injury, blindness or death. - Avoid this hazard by relieving pressure before disconnecting hydraulic or other lines. SA0016 - Tighten all connections before applying pressure. - Search for leaks with a piece of cardboard; take care to protect hands and body from high-pressure fluids. Wear a face shield or goggles for eye protection. - In an accident occurs, see a doctor familiar with SA0017 this type of injury immediately. Any fluid injected into the skin must be surgically removed within a few hours or gangrene may result. SA0018 PREVENT PARTS FROM FLYING OFF • Grease in the track adjuster is under high pressure. Failure to follow the precautions below may result in serious injury, blindness, or death. - NEVER attempt to remove GREASE FITTING or VALVE ASSEMBLY. - As pieces may fly off, be sure to keep body and face away from valve. • Travel reduction gears are under pressure. S0178 - As pieces may fly off, be sure to keep body and face away from air release plug to avoid injury. reduction gear oil is hot. Wait for gear oil to cool down, then gradually loosen the air release plug to release pressure.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-23 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS PROTECT AGAINST FLYING DEBRIS • If flying debris hit eyes or any other part of the body, serious injury may result. - Guard against injury from flying pieces of metal or debris; wear goggles or safety glasses. - Keep bystanderds away from the working area before striking any object. S0046 HANDLE FLUIDS SAFELY - AVOID FIRES • Handle fuel with care: it is highly flammable. If fuel ignites, an explosion and/or a fire may occur, possi- bly resulting in serious injury or death. - Do not refuel the machine while smoking or when near open flame or sparks. - Always stop the engine before refuelling the ma- chine. - Fill the tank outdoors. S0050 • All fuels, most lubrificants, and some antifreeze fluids are flammable. - Store flammable fluids well away from fire haz- ards. - Do not burn or puncture pressurized containers. - Do not store oily rags; they can ignite and burn spontaneously. S0051

Copyright © New Holland S2-24 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS PREVENT FIRES • Check for Oil Leaks: - Fuel, hydraulic oil and lubricant leaks can lead to fires. - Check for missing or loose clamps, kinked hoses, lines or hoses that rub against each other, damage to the oil-cooler, and loose oil-cooler flange bolts which may cause oil leaks. - Tighten, repair or replace any missing, loose or damaged clamps, lines, hoses, oil-cooler and oil- S0051 cooler flange bolts. - Do not bend or strike high-pressure lines. - Never install bent or damaged lines, pipes, or hoses. • Check for Shorts circuits which could cause fires: - Clean and tighten all electrical connections. - Check before each shift or after about ten (10) hour operation for loose, kinked, hardened or frayed electrical cables and wires. - Check before each shift or after about ten (10) hour operation for missing or damaged terminal caps. - DO NOT OPERATE MACHINE if cable or wires are loose, kinked, etc. • Clean up Flammables: - Spilled fuel and lubricans, and trash, grease, debris, accumulated coal dust, and other flammables may cause fires. - Prevent fires by inspecting and cleaning the machine daily and by removing spilled or accumulated flammables immediately. • Check Key-start Switch: - If a fire breaks out, failure to stop the engine will escalate the fire, hampering fire fighting. - Always check key-start switch function before operating the machine every day: 1. Start the engine and run it at slow idle. 2. Turn the key-start switch to the OFF position to confirm that the engine stops. - If any abnormalities are found, be sure to repair them before operating the machine. • Check Heat Shields: - Damaged or missing heat shields may lead to fires. - Damaged or missing heat shields must be repaired or replaced before operating the machine.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S2-25 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS EVACUATING IN CASE OF FIRE • If a fire breaks out, evacuate the machine in the following way: - Stop the engine by turning the key-start switch to the OFF position if there is time. - Use a fire extinguisher if there is time. - Exit the machine. S0060 BEWARE OF EXHAUST FUMES • Prevent asphyxiation. Engine exhaust fumes can cause sickness or death. - If you must operate in a building, be sure there is adequate ventilation. Either use an exhaust pipe extension to remove the exhaust fumes or open doors and windows to bring enough outside air into the area. S0061 USE APPROPRIATE TOOLS • Use tools appropriate for the job to be performed. - Inappropriate tools, parts and procedures might generate dangerous conditions. - Use tools of correct size to tighten or loosening securing elements, in order to avoid injuries caused by a wrench getting out of control. - Do not use U.S. Standard or British Standard tools on metric fasteners and vice versa. • Use only genuine spare parts (please refer to the PARTS CATALOG). S0120

Copyright © New Holland S2-26 E265-E305 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AVOID HEATING NEAR PRESSURIZED FLUID LINES Flammable spray can be generated by heating near pressurized fluid lines, resulting in severe burns to yourself and bystanders. Do not heat by welding, soldering, or using a torch near pressurized fluid lines or other flammable materials. Pressurized lines can be accidentally cut when heat goes beyond the immediate flame area. Install temporary fire resistant guards to protect hoses or other materials when welding, soldering, etc. AVOID APPLYING HEAT TO LINES S0062 CONTAINING FLAMMABLE FLUIDS - Do not weld or flame cut pipes or tubes that contain flammable fluids. - Clean them thoroughly with non-flammable solvent before welding or flame cutting them. REMOVE PAINT BEFORE WELDING OR HEATING • Hazardous fumes can be generated when paints is heated by weiding, soldering, or using a torch. If inhaled, these fumes may cause sickness. - Avoid breathing potentially toxic fumes and dust. - Do all such work outside or in a well-ventilated area. - Dispose of paint and solvents properly. - Remove paint before welding or heating: 1. If you sand or grind paint, avoid breathing the dust. Wear an approved respirator. 2. If you use solvent or paint stripper, remove S0063 stripper with soap and water before welding. Remove solvent or paint stripper containers and other flammable material from area. Allow fumes to disperse at least 15 minutes before welding or heating.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S3-1 SAFETY PLATES Triple articulation version 1 R3008 1 2 R3009 Triple articulation version 1 R3010 1 2 R3011 1 - Attachment operating range safety plate 2 - Track adjuster plate

Copyright © New Holland S3-2 E265-E305 SAFETY PLATES 10 6 4 5 3 9 R3013 13 7 11 12 8 R3012 3 - Counterweight operating range safety plate 8 - Engine hood warning plate 4 - Read-your-manual plate 9 - Controls lock/unlock plate (safety lever) 5 - Boom and arm movement warning plate 10 - Biodegradable hydraulic oil level check plate (opt.) (Triple articulation version) 11 - Burns warning plate 6 - Open windscreen warning plate (inside the cab) 12 - Safety distance plate 7 - Tag indicating maintenance in progress 13 - No-stepping warning plate

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S3-3 SAFETY PLATES 1 - Attachment operating range safety plate Ensure that any person near the working site is outside the machine operating range before starting the machine or operating the attachments. Sound the horn. Yellow background Black border and icons S0074 2 - Track adjuster plate It shows that obligation is made to consult the Operation and Maintenance Instruction Manual prior to acting on the track adjust valve. Danger of severe injuries. Yellow background Black border and icons S0076 3 - Counterweight operating range safety plate Ensure that any person near the working site is outside the machine operating range before starting the machine or operating the attachments. Sound the horn. Yellow background Black border and icons S0075

Copyright © New Holland S3-4 E265-E305 SAFETY PLATES 4 - Read-your-manual plate It is positioned in the cab to recommend to care- fully read the Operation and Maintenance Instruc- tion Manual prior to starting, operating, servicing, refuelling or carrying out any other work on the machine. Yellow background Black border and icons S0077 5 - Boom and arm movement warning plate (triple articulation version) It shows the danger represented by the bucket hitting the cab. Pay special attention as no stops are provided to prevent this problem. Yellow background Black border and icons S0139 6 - Open windscreen warning plate (inside the cab) It indicates the risk of injuries deriving from the windscreen not being locked or being improperly locked in the open position. Yellow background Black border and icons S0079

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 S3-5 SAFETY PLATES 7 - Tag indicating maintenance in progress Maintenance staff is obliged to apply the tag that indicates that the machine is not fully efficient and warns about maintenance staff being located in not visible positions. This tag should be applied to the left-hand control lever, safety lever or cab door. Yellow background Black border and icons S0080 8 - Engine hood warning plate It highlights the obligation to stop the engine be- fore opening engine hood. Danger of severe injuries following the presence of rotating parts such as fan, pulleys, and belts. Yellow background Black border and icons S0081 9 - Controls lock/unlock plate (safety lever) It shows the position that the safety lever can assume when the engine is running. When the operator is about to leave the cab with the engine running, even if for a short time, he must move the safety lever to the LOCK posi- LOCK tion. Controls are disabled and therefore no acci- dental machine or attachment movement is pos- sible. S0083 White background Black border and icons

Copyright © New Holland S3-6 E265-E305 SAFETY PLATES 10 - Biodegradable hydraulic oil level check plate (optional) It shows that the machine is filled with biodegradable hydraulic oil and that it is necessary to consult this manual for correct practices (oil level check, sampling, and change). Yellow background Black border and icons S0088 11 - Burns danger plate It indicates that a burns danger exists, since the zone is characterised by high temperature. Background: yellow Lettering and edges: black S0095 12 - Safety distance plate It instructs to keep at a safe distance from a zone dangerous for personal safety. Background: yellow Lettering and edges: black S0096 13 - No-stepping warning plate It instructs not to step on the zone where this decal is attached. Background: yellow Cross: red Lettering and edges: black S0097

Copyright © New Holland OPERATIONAL PRINCIPLE R0077

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Copyright © New Holland OPERATIONAL PRINCIPLE E265-E305 SECTION AND GROUP CONTENTS Section 1 GENERAL Group 1 Specifications Group 2 Component Layout Section 2 SYSTEM Group 1 Mechatro Control System Group 2 Mechatro Controller Group 3 Hydraulic System Group 4 Electrical System Section 3 COMPONENT OPERATION Group 1 Hydraulic Pump Assy Group 2 Pilot Valve Group 3 Control Valve Group 4 Swing Device Group 5 Travel Device Group 6 Swing Joint Group 7 Cylinders Group 8 Air Conditioner

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Copyright © New Holland SECTION 1 E265-E305 GENERAL CONTENTS Group 1 - Specifications Group 2 - Component Layout Transporting Dimensions (E265) Main Components ................................... T1-2-1 (Monoblock Version) ................................ T1-1-1 Electrical System Digging Data (E265) (Overall System) ..................................... T1-2-2 (Monoblock Version) ................................ T1-1-2 Electrical System (Control Cab, Transporting Dimensions (E265) Instrument and Switches) ....................... T1-2-3 (Triple Articulation Version) ...................... T1-1-3 Electrical System Digging Data (E265) (Cluster Gauge and Indicator Lights) ....... T1-2-4 (Triple Articulation Version) ...................... T1-1-4 Electrical System (Fuse Box, Transporting Dimensions (E305) Mechatro Controller and Relays) ............. T1-2-5 (Monoblock Version) ................................ T1-1-5 Electrical System Digging Data (E305) (Fuse Box) .............................................. T1-2-6 (Monoblock Version) ................................ T1-1-6 Electrical System Transporting Dimensions (E305) (Batteries, Fuse Link, Relays) ................. T1-2-7 (Triple Articulation Version) ...................... T1-1-7 Electrical System Digging Data (E305) (Engine Electrical Components) .............. T1-2-8 (Triple Articulation Version) ...................... T1-1-8 Electrical System (Hydraulic Excavator Performance (E265) ............... T1-1-9 System Electrical Components) ............ T1-2-10 Engine Data (E265) ................................. T1-1-9 Electrical System Excavator Performance (E305) ............. T1-1-10 (Lights, Horn) ........................................ T1-2-11 Engine Data (E305) ............................... T1-1-10 Hydraulic Components (E265) ............... T1-1-11 Hydraulic Components (E305) ............... T1-1-14

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Copyright © New Holland E265 T1-1-1 SPECIFICATIONS TRANSPORTING DIMENSIONS E265 (Monoblock Version) M0614 VERSIONS A B C D E F G H I L (1) 10 200 (1) 3 390 (2) 10 170 (2) 3 320 E265EL 3 846 4 660 1 118 2 950 2 950 3 050 970 488 (3) 10 120 (3) 3 140 (4) 10 100 (4) 3 140 (1) 10 200 (1) 3 390 (2) 10 170 (2) 3 320 E265LC 3 846 4 660 1 118 2 950 2 950 3 050 970 488 (3) 10 120 (3) 3 140 (4) 10 100 (4) 3 140 Arm: (Dimensions in mm) (1) 2 160 mm (2) 2 500 mm (3) 2 980 mm (4) 3 660 mm E265EL E265LC M Track shoe width (mm) 600 700 800 900 600 700 800 900 N Gauge (mm) 2 990 3 090 3 190 3 290 3 190 3 290 3 390 3 490 O Frame width (mm) 3 064 3 064 3 064 3 064 3 264 3 264 3 264 3 264 Working weight (kg) 26 320 26 650 26 980 27 310 26 380 26 710 27 040 27 370 Spec. ground pressure (bar) 0.56 0.49 0.43 0.39 0.56 0.49 0.43 0.39

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-2 E265 SPECIFICATIONS DIGGING DATA (E265) (Monoblock Version) R3001 (Dimensions in mm) Arm 2 160 2 500 2 980 3 660 A 9 647 9 919 10 335 11 001 A’ 9 465 9 742 10 166 10 842 B 6 168 6 508 6 988 7 668 B’ 5 953 6 305 6 805 7 520 C 9 579 9 668 9 813 10 218 D 6 828 6 818 6 990 7 369 E 3 964 3 934 3 985 3 916 F 4 351 3 971 3 616 3 016 G 5 606 5 908 6 400 6 929

Copyright © New Holland E265 T1-1-3 SPECIFICATIONS TRANSPORTING DIMENSIONS E265 (Triple Articulation Version) M0615 VERSIONS A B C D E F G H I L (1) 10 220 (1) 3 220 (2) 10 180 (2) 3 170 E265EL 3 846 4 660 1 118 2 950 2 950 3 050 970 488 (3) 10 680 (3) 3 050 (4) 10 150 (4) 3 190 (1) 10 220 (1) 3 220 (2) 10 180 (2) 3 170 E265LC 3 846 4 660 1 118 2 950 2 950 3 050 970 488 (3) 10 680 (3) 3 050 (4) 10 150 (4) 3 190 Arm: (Dimensions in mm) (1) 2 160 mm (2) 2 500 mm (3) 2 980 mm (4) 3 660 mm E265EL E265LC M Track shoe width (mm) 600 700 800 900 600 700 800 900 N Gauge (mm) 2 990 3 090 3 190 3 290 3 190 3 290 3 390 3 490 O Frame width (mm) 3 064 3 064 3 064 3 064 3 264 3 264 3 264 3 264 Working weight (kg) 27 220 27 550 27 880 28 210 27 280 27 610 27 940 28 270 Spec. ground pressure (bar) 0.58 0.50 0.44 0.40 0.58 0.50 0.45 0.40

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-4 E265 SPECIFICATIONS DIGGING DATA (E265) (Triple Articulation Version) R3003 (Dimensions in mm) Arm 2 160 2 500 2 980 3 660 A 9 733 10 017 10 445 11 118 A’ 9 553 9 842 10 277 10 960 B 5 777 6 093 6 554 7 239 B’ 5 685 5 986 6 453 7 147 C 11 098 11 302 11 633 12 218 D 8 058 8 266 8 595 9 182 E 2 882 2 715 2 477 2 463 F 5 251 4 752 4 216 3 539 G 2 468 2 763 3 118 3 475

Copyright © New Holland E305 T1-1-5 SPECIFICATIONS TRANSPORTING DIMENSIONS E305 (Monoblock Version) M0614 VERSIONS A B C D E F G H I L (1) 10 470 (1) 3 490 (2) 10 370 (2) 3 410 E305EL 4 010 4 870 1 245 2 950 2 950 3 170 1 040 539 (3) 10 270 (3) 3 160 (4) 10 280 (4) 3 200 (1) 10 470 (1) 3 490 (2) 10 370 (2) 3 410 E305LC 4 010 4 870 1 245 2 950 2 950 3 170 1 040 539 (3) 10 270 (3) 3 160 (4) 10 280 (4) 3 200 Arm: (Dimensions in mm) (1) 2 100 mm (2) 2 400 mm (3) 3 100 mm (4) 3 750 mm E305EL E305LC M Track shoe width (mm) 600 700 800 900 600 700 800 900 N Gauge (mm) 2 990 3 090 3 190 3 290 3 190 3 290 3 390 3 490 O Frame width (mm) 2 998 2 998 2 998 2 998 3 198 3 198 3 198 3 198 Working weight (kg) 29 400 29 800 30 200 30 600 29 460 29 860 30 260 30 660 Spec. ground pressure (bar) 0.60 0.52 0.46 0.42 0.60 0.52 0.46 0.42

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-6 E305 SPECIFICATIONS DIGGING DATA (E305) (Monoblock Version) R3005 (Dimensions in mm) Arm 2 100 2 400 3 100 3 750 A 9 830 10 120 10 750 11 389 A’ 9 628 9 924 10 565 11 215 B 6 254 6 554 7 254 7 904 B’ 6 034 6 357 7 088 7 763 C 9 747 9 942 10 232 10 632 D 6 978 7 128 7 402 7 770 E 4 226 4 216 4 116 4 113 F 4 657 4 402 3 854 3 237 G 5 873 6 077 6 705 7 202

Copyright © New Holland E305 T1-1-7 SPECIFICATIONS TRANSPORTING DIMENSIONS E305 (Triple Articulation Version) M0615 VERSIONS A B C D E F G H I L (1) 10 420 (1) 3 270 (2) 10 320 (2) 3 220 E305EL 4 010 4 870 1 245 2 950 2 950 3 170 1 040 539 (3) 10 260 (3) 3 060 (4) 10 250 (4) 3 290 (1) 10 420 (1) 3 270 (2) 10 320 (2) 3 220 E305LC 4 010 4 870 1 245 2 950 2 950 3 170 1 040 539 (3) 10 260 (3) 3 060 (4) 10 250 (4) 3 290 Arm: (Dimensions in mm) (1) 2 100 mm (2) 2 400 mm (3) 3 100 mm (4) 3 750 mm E305EL E305LC M Track shoe width (mm) 600 700 800 900 600 700 800 900 N Gauge (mm) 2 990 3 090 3 190 3 290 3 190 3 290 3 390 3 490 O Frame width (mm) 2 998 2 998 2 998 2 998 3 198 3 198 3 198 3 198 Working weight (kg) 30 300 30 700 31 100 31 500 30 360 30 760 31 160 31 560 Spec. ground pressure (bar) 0.62 0.54 0.48 0.43 0.62 0.54 0.48 0.43

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-8 E305 SPECIFICATIONS DIGGING DATA (E305) (Triple Articulation Version) R3007 (Dimensions in mm) Arm 2 100 2 400 3 100 3 750 A 9 857 10 152 10 800 11 447 A’ 9 655 9 956 10 616 11 273 B 5 778 6 079 6 761 7 416 B’ 5 666 5 972 6 663 7 326 C 11 301 11 564 12 088 12 659 D 8 105 8 366 8 891 9 462 E 3 084 2 911 2 562 2 645 F 5 515 5 162 4 378 3 742 G 2 667 2 771 3 221 3 538

Copyright © New Holland E265 T1-1-9 SPECIFICATIONS EXCAVATOR PERFORMANCE (E265) GRADEABILITY ......................................................................................................................................... 70% TRAVEL SPEED Excavator E265 Speed First speed 4.0 km/h Second speed 6.0 km/h ENGINE DATA E265 MAIN SPECIFICATIONS (E265) - Manufacturer CNH U.K. - Model 667TA/EEG Four cycle, common-rail, direct injection, - Type with intercooler turbo charger - Number of cylinder 6 in-line - Bore 102 mm - Stroke 120 mm - Total displacement 5 900 cm3 - Compression ratio 17.1 : 1 - Net power at flywheel 137 kW -1 - Torque (at 1400 min ) 710 Nm - Engine idle at no-load 1000 min-1 INJECTION PUMP - Type ........................................................................................................................................ BOSCH CP3.3 - Injection order ................................................................................................................................. 1-5-3-6-2-4 - Injection pressure range ........................................................................................................... 250 ~ 1450 bar BATTERY - Voltage - Capacity ............................................................................................................... 2 x 12 V - 160 Ah STARTER MOTOR - Voltage - Output ............................................................................................................................. 24V - 4 kW ALTERNATOR - Voltage - Output ............................................................................................................................ 28,5V - 70A

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-10 E305 SPECIFICATIONS EXCAVATOR PERFORMANCE (E305) GRADEABILITY ......................................................................................................................................... 70% TRAVEL SPEED Excavator E305 Speed First speed 3.5 km/h Second speed 5.5 km/h ENGINE DATA E305 MAIN SPECIFICATIONS (E305) - Manufacturer CNH U.K. - Model 667TA/EEC Four cycle, common-rail, direct injection, - Type with intercooler turbo charger - Number of cylinder 6 in-line - Bore 102 mm - Stroke 120 mm - Total displacement 5 900 cm3 - Compression ratio 17.1 : 1 - Net power at flywheel 148 kW -1 - Torque (at 1400 min ) 810 Nm - Engine idle at no-load 1000 min-1 INJECTION PUMP - Type ........................................................................................................................................ BOSCH CP3.3 - Injection order ................................................................................................................................. 1-5-3-6-2-4 - Injection pressure range .......................................................................................................... 250 ~ 1450 bar BATTERY - Voltage - Capacity ............................................................................................................... 2 x 12 V - 160 Ah STARTER MOTOR - Voltage - Output ............................................................................................................................. 24V - 4 kW ALTERNATOR - Voltage - Output ............................................................................................................................ 28,5V - 70A

Copyright © New Holland E265 T1-1-11 SPECIFICATIONS HYDRAULIC COMPONENTS (E265) HYDRAULIC PUMP Item Main pump Gear pump for pilot Pump model K3V112DTP1ALR-9TGL ZX10LGRZ2-07D Max. displacement capacity cm3 112 × 2 10 Rated min-1 2100 ← Revolution (Clockwise seen Hi idle from shaft end) 2385 or less ← Rated 34.3 Pressure MPa 5.0 ATT boost 37.8 Max. flow L/min 235 × 2 at 7.8 MPa 21 Max. input Horse Power kW 129 3.4 Max. input torque N·m 588 14.7 Model KR3G-9TEL Regulator Control function Electric flow control, positive flow control, total power control at back-up and power shift control at back-up Others With solenoid proportional reducing valve (KDRDE5K-31/30C50-102) Mass kg 131 NOTE - The max. input power and the max. input torque of the main pump include those of the gear pump. CONTROL VALVE Item STD VALVE Model KMX15YC / B33051 Max. flow L/min 242 × 2 Main relief valve set pressure MPa 34.3 at 180 L/min When power boost pressure 37.8 at 160 L/min Over load relief valve set pressure MPa Boom H, Bucket H, Arm R 39.7 at 30 L/min Boom R, Bucket R, Arm H 37.8 at 30 L/min OPT2 H&R 37.8 at 30 L/min

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-12 E265 SPECIFICATIONS PILOT VALVE ATTACHMENT TRAVEL Primary pressure 5.0 MPa 4.9 MPa Secondary pressure 0.6 ~ 3.2 MPa 0.54 ~ 2.35 MPa Rated flow 20 L/min 10 L/min Mass Approx. 2 kg Approx. 11 kg SWING MOTOR Model MFC160-059 Type Swash-plate type, axial piston motor Displacement cm3 151 Hydraulic motor Working pressure MPa 28.5 Max. flow L/min 253 Braking torque Nm 686~892 Release pressure MPa 3.1 Relief set pressure MPa 28.5 Mass kg 63 Speed reduction type Planetary 2-stage Reduction ratio 16.81 Reduction unit Lubicate oil Gear oil SAE90 (API class GL–4 grade) Lubicate oil volume L 15.3 Grease Extreme pressure multipurpose grease Grease volume A small amount Mass kg 234 Total Mass kg 297

Copyright © New Holland E265 T1-1-13 SPECIFICATIONS TRAVEL DEVICE Item E265 Reduction gear unit Epicycloidal, three-stage planetary type Model 710 C3 K Gearbox ratio 1 : 49.5 Travel motor Two speed, axial piston swash plate type Model MAG 170 VP 3 high speed 97.1 cm3/rev Displacement low speed 147.8 cm3/rev Max. flow 241.5 L/min Max. output torque (theoretical) 807.1 Nm at 343 bar low speed 39 941 Nm Max. gearbox output torque high speed 26 233 Nm static 470 Nm Parking brake torque dynamic 370 Nm Min. pressure parking brake release 14 bar cracking 310 bar at 1.2 L/min Relief valve set pressure total flow 353 bar at 40 L/min Mass 235 kg CYLINDERS Machine E265 Center distance Cylinder bore / of pins Use Stroke Cushion Dry weight Rod Dia. Full extend B / Full retract A mm mm mm kg With cushion Boom Ø 135 / Ø 90 1 235 3 045 / 1 810 234 on rod side With cushion Arm Ø 140 / Ø 100 1 635 3 856 / 2 221 324 on both sides With cushion Bucket Ø 125 / Ø 90 1 200 2 962 / 1 762 204 on rod side Positioning Ø 150 / Ø 100 1 200 2 980 / 1 780 – 270

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-14 E305 SPECIFICATIONS HYDRAULIC COMPONENTS (E305) HYDRAULIC PUMP Item Main pump Gear pump for pilot Pump model K3V112DTP1CLR-9THL ZX10LGRZ2-07D Max. displacement capacity cm3 115 × 2 10 Rated min-1 2100 ← Revolution (Clockwise seen Hi idle from shaft end) 2150 or less ← Rated 34.3 Pressure MPa 5.0 ATT boost 37.8 Max. flow L/min 241 × 2 at 7.8 MPa 21 Max. input Horse Power kW 138 3.4 Max. input torque N·m 628 14.7 Model KR3G-9THL Regulator Control function Electric flow control, positive flow control, total power control at back-up and power shift control at back-up Others With solenoid proportional reducing valve (KDRDE5K-31/30C50-102) Mass kg 131 NOTE - The max. input power and the max. input torque of the main pump include those of the gear pump. CONTROL VALVE Item STD VALVE Model KMX15YC / B33061 Max. flow L/min 247 × 2 Main relief valve set pressure MPa 34.3 at 180 L/min When power boost pressure 37.8 at 160 L/min Over load relief valve set pressure MPa Boom H, Bucket H, Arm R 39.7 at 30 L/min Boom R, Bucket R, Arm H 37.8 at 30 L/min OPT2 H&R 37.8 at 30 L/min

Copyright © New Holland E305 T1-1-15 SPECIFICATIONS PILOT VALVE ATTACHMENT TRAVEL Primary pressure 5.0 MPa 4.9 MPa Secondary pressure 0.6 ~ 3.2 MPa 0.54 ~ 2.35 MPa Rated flow 20 L/min 10 L/min Mass Approx. 2 kg Approx. 11 kg SWING MOTOR Model M5X180CHB–10A–25A/280 Type Swash-plate type, fixed-displacement plunger motor Displacement cm3 180.1 Rated press MPa Hydraulic motor 27.5 Max. speed min-1 1710 Max. flow L/min 269 +274 Braking torque Nm 846 0 Release pressure MPa 2.4~5.0 Relief set pressure MPa 2.5 Mass kg 60.5 Anti- Type 2KAR6P72/240-712 reaction valve block Mass kg 2.5 Hydraulic motor assy mass kg 63 Speed reduction type Planetary 2-stage Reduction ratio 21.178 Reduction unit Lubicate oil Gear oil SAE90 (API class GL–4 grade) Lubicate oil volume L 10.5 Grease Extreme pressure multipurpose grease Grease volume 5.9 Mass kg 356 Total mass kg 419

Copyright © New Holland T1-1-16 E305 SPECIFICATIONS TRAVEL DEVICE Item E305 Reduction gear unit Epicycloidal, two-stage planetary type Model - Reduction gear ratio 1 : 33.814 Travel motor Two speed, axial piston swash plate type Model M3V260/160A-RG5 Max 262.6 cm3/rev Displacement Min 160.6 cm3/rev Rated flow 320 L/min low speed 48 500 Nm at 34.3 MPa Theoretical output torque high speed 29 600 Nm at 34.3 MPa Parking brake torque 902 Nm Release pressure of parking brake 1.54 MPa cracking 35.8~37.8 MPa Relief valve set pressure working 34.3 MPa Mass (with oil) 320 kg CYLINDERS Machine E305 Center distance Cylinder bore / of pins Use Stroke Cushion Dry weight Rod Dia. Full extend B / Full retract A mm mm mm kg With cushion Boom Ø 140 / Ø 95 1 235 3 045 / 1 810 248 on rod side With cushion Arm Ø 145 / Ø 105 1 670 3 926 / 2 256 348 on both sides With cushion Bucket Ø 130 / Ø 90 1 208 3 004 / 1 796 225 on rod side Positioning Ø 150 / Ø 100 1 230 3 045 / 1 815 _ 272

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T1-2-1 COMPONENT LAYOUT MAIN COMPONENTS 6 5 7 4 10 11 3 12 13 2 8 14 9 15 1 29 16 28 27 17 26 18 25 24 19 30 23 22 20 21 R2222 1 - Bucket 11 - Swing motor 21 - Track link 2 - Bucket link 12 - Fuel tank 22 - Batteries 3 - Idler link 13 - Hydraulic oil tank 23 - Upper roller 4 - Bucket cylinder 14 - Control valve 24 - Track guide 5 - Arm 15 - Engine muffler 25 - Lower roller 6 - Arm cylinder 16 - Hydraulic pump 26 - Air cleaner 7 - Boom 17 - Engine 27 - Crawler adjuster 8 - Boom cylinder 18 - Counterweight 28 - Front idler 9 - Cab 19 - Engine radiator 29 - Shoe plate 10 - Swivel joint 20 - Travel motor 30 - Engine controller

Copyright © New Holland T1-2-2 E265-E305 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Overall system) A B C F D E R3266 A - Control cab D - Batteries B - Fuse Box, Mechatro controller, engine controller and relays E - Engine electrical components C - Battery relay, Fuse link and solenoid valve F - Hydraulic system electrical components assembly

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T1-2-3 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Control cab, Instrument and switches) 12 1 2 14 3 18 4 11 15 16 5 17 6 7 8 13 9 10 R2223 1 - Cluster gauge (C-2) 10 - Socket 12 V D.C. (E-23) 2 - Power boost pushbutton 11 - Air conditioning switch (SW-13) 3 - Hand control accelerator (SE-16) 12 - Swing parking release switch (SW-4) 4 - Working light switch (SW-20) 13 - Hydraulic Pressure remove switch (SW-50) 5 - Cab working light switch (SW-26) 14 - Key switch (SW-1) 6 - Load alarm select switch (SW-12) 15 - Cigarette lighter (E-14) 7 - Quick coupler operation switch (SW-40) 16 - Diagnostic engine led (L-13) 8 - Heavy lift switch (SW-35) 17 - Diagnostic engine request switch (SW-46) 9 - Tuner (E-7) 18 - "Travel Indipendence" switch

Copyright © New Holland T1-2-4 E265-E305 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Cluster gauge and indicator lights) 2 1 3 4 13 5 12 6 11 10 9 8 7 R0445 1 - Engine coolant temperature indicator 8 - Conflux select switch 2 - Working Mode Indicators 9 - Buzzer stop switch 3 - Fuel meter 10 - Auto Idle switch 4 - Display 11 - Travel speed select 5 - Washer switch 12 - Led 6 - Wiper switch 13 - Display select switch 7 - MODE switch

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T1-2-5 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Fuse box, Mechatro controller and relays) 1 19 13 14 17 8 18 9 15/16 11 12 2 5 4 R2224 1 - Mechatro controller (C-1) 13 - Timer (R-40) 2 - Fuse box (E-4) 14 - Voltage converter (E-22) 4 - Swing parking release switch (SW-4) 15 - Low idle relay (R-28) 5 - Wiper relay assy (R-7) 16 - Mode select relay (R-32) 8 - Horn relay (R-5) 17 - Engine stop relay (R-31) 9 - Engine pressure signal relay (R-29) 18 - Engine water temperature signal relay (R-30) 11 - Rotary Bucket (Extra) Left relay (R-27) (opt.) 19 - Resistances group (E-16) 12 - Rotary Bucket (Extra) Right relay (R-26) (opt.)

Copyright © New Holland T1-2-6 E265-E305 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Fuse Box) FUSES IN THE BOX PROTECTED Value Fuse Label CIRCUIT (A) MECHATRO Mechatro 1 20 CONTROLLER controller 2 RELAY Relay 10 3 LIGHTER Lighter 10 Converter 4 CONVERTER 10 (Tuner-Soket 12 V) 5 HORN Horn 10 FUEL SUPPLY Fuel Supply 6 20 PUMP Pump CONTROLLER Mechatro 7 10 BACK UP Controller Back up 8 / / / 9 ROOM LIGHT Room Light 10 10 KEY SWITCH Key Switch 20 11 AUTO GREASE Auto Grease 10 12 HEATING SEAT Heating Seat 20 CLUSTER Cluster Gauge 13 10 GAUGE WIPER 14 Wiper Washer 20 WASHER 15 SOLENOID Solenoid Valve 10 WORKING 16 Working Light 20 LIGHT OPTIONAL Optional Working 17 WORKING 20 Light Room LIGHT AIR Air Conditioner 18 CONDITIONER 20 Heater HEATER AIR 19 Air Conditioner 10 CONDITIONER 20 RESERVE Opt 24 V 20 R0447

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T1-2-7 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Batteries, Fuse link, Relays) 7 6 1 5 4 3 2 R3300 FUSES IN THE AIR FILTER COMP. Fuse Protected Rating Decal N° circuit (A) Fuse powering FUSE 1 60 (6-7-9-10) BOX A Engine controller FUSE 2 20 supply Fuse powering FUSE 3 60 (11-20) FUSE 4 Starter relay 40 BOX B FUSE 5 Alternator 80 Mechatro FUSE 6 30 controller Fuel heated FUSE 7 40 filters 1 - Battery relay (R-1) 5 - Engine stop relay (R31) 2 - Fuse link 7 40 A (E-27) 6 - Grid heater relay 3 - Box B 7 - Batteries (E-1) 4 - Box A

Copyright © New Holland T1-2-8 E265-E305 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Engine electrical components) 1 2 3 4 6 5 7 R3241 1 - Air filter restriction switch (SW-8) 5 - Engine revolution sensor 2 - Engine coolant level switch (SW-23) 6 - Fuel sensor 3 - Fuel supply pump 7 - Engine Control Unit (C-3) 4 - Hydraulic oil level switch (SW-25)

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T1-2-9 COMPONENT LAYOUT Engine electrical components 1 2 3 4 5 12 6 11 7 10 9 R3242 1 - Coolant temperature sensor 7 - Fuel temperature sensor 2 - Electro-injector 9 - Increment speed sensor 3 - Rail pressure sensor 10 - Engine oil level sensor 4 - Boost pressure and temperature sensor 11 - Pressure and temperature oil pressure 5 - Starter motor 12 - Grid heater 6 - Segment speed sensor

Copyright © New Holland T1-2-10 E265-E305 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Hydraulic System electrical components) 28 1 2 3 To press 25 sensors 24 26-27 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 4 15 14 10 9 8 7 6 11 5 12 R3268 1 - Travel unload proportional solenoid valve (PSV-F) 15 - Rotary Bucket (Extra) solenoid valve (B) (SV-15) (opt) 2 - Pump P2 proportional solenoid valve (PSV-P2) 16 - P1 Opt. sensor valve (SE-20) 3 - Pump P1 proportional solenoid valve (PSV-P1) 17 - Travel right sensor (SE-9) 4 - Swing sensor (SE-5) 18 - Travel left sensor (SE-10) 5 - Operating lever lock solenoid valve (SV-4) 19 - P2 Opt. sensor valve (SE-11) 6 - Power boost solenoid valve (SV-2) 20 - Bucket digging sensor (SE-1) 7 - P2 By-pass cut proportional solenoid valve (PSV-B) 21 - Bucket dump sensor (SE-2) 8 - Travel priority proportional solenoid valve (PSV-C) 22 - Boom raising sensor (SE-3) 9 - P1 By-pass cut proportional solenoid valve (PSV-D) 23 - Boom lowering sensor (SE-4) 10 - Arm variable re-circulation proportional solenoid valve 24 - Arm in sensor (SE-7) (PSV-A) 25 - Arm out sensor (SE-8) 11 - Two speed select solenoid valve (SV-3) 26 - Pump P1 sensor (SE-22) 12 - Swing parking brake solenoid valve (SV-1) 27 - Pump P2 sensor (SE-23) 14 - Rotary Bucket (Extra) solenoid valve (A) (SV-16) (opt) 28 - Attachment unload proportional solenoid valve (PSV-E)

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T1-2-11 COMPONENT LAYOUT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Lights, Horn) 2 1 4 3 R3301 1 - Frame Working light (L-2) 3 - Engine room light (L-12) 2 - Boom Working lght (L-1) 4 - Horn

Copyright © New Holland T1-2-12 E265-E305 COMPONENT LAYOUT NOTES:

Copyright © New Holland SECTION 2 E265-E305 SYSTEM CONTENTS Group 1 - Mechatro Control System Group 3 - Hydraulic Circuit Outline .................................................. T2-1-1 Summary .............................................. T2-3-1 Boom up Conflux .................................. T2-1-4 Neutral Circuit ....................................... T2-3-3 Arm in Recirculation & Sequence Travel Circuit (E265) .............................. T2-3-6 Conflux ................................................. T2-1-6 Travel Circuit (E305) .............................. T2-3-7 Arm in Anti-cavitation Control ............... T2-1-8 Bucket Circuit ....................................... T2-3-9 Arm out Conflux .................................... T2-1-9 Boom Circuit ......................................... T2-3-11 Travel Straight ....................................... T2-1-10 Swing Circuit (E265) ............................. T2-3-15 Swing Priority Control ........................... T2-1-12 Swing Circuit (E305) ............................. T2-3-16 Pressure Draining (releasing) Arm Circuit (E265) ................................ T2-3-18 Control .................................................. T2-1-14 Arm Circuit (E305) ................................ T2-3-19 Pump Control (Positive Control Combined Operation (E265) .................. T2-3-26 & P-Q Control) ...................................... T2-1-16 Combined Operation (E305) .................. T2-3-27 Standby Flow Constant Control ............. T2-1-18 Pressure Drain (releasing) Circuit .......... T2-3-32 Crusher & Breaker Circuit ..................... T2-3-34 Positioning Circuit (Triple Articulation Version) .................... T2-3-40 Group 2 - Mechatro Controller Group 4 - Electrical System Summary of Mechatro Controller .......... T2-2-1 Outline .................................................. T2-4-1 Self Diagnosis Display Function ............ T2-2-7 Electric Power Circuit Service Diagnosis ................................. T2-2-8 (Key switch in OFF position) ................. T2-4-2 Trouble History Diagnosis ...................... T2-2-10 Accessory Circuit (Key switch in ACC position) ................. T2-4-4 How to Correct the Cumulative Time ..................................................... T2-2-12 Electric Power Circuit (Key switch in ON position) ................... T2-4-6 Contrast of Display Adjusting Procedure ............................................. T2-2-13 Starting Circuit (Key switch in START position) ............. T2-4-8 Mechatro Control Equipment ................. T2-2-14 Charging Circuit (Key switch in ON position) ................... T2-4-10 Preheating Circuit ................................. T2-4-12 Engine Stop Circuit ............................... T2-4-14 Emergency Operating Circuit ................ T2-4-16 Engine Control Unit input/output ............ T2-4-18

Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-1 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM OUTLINE System summary Features Purposes P1, P2 pump is control- P1 pump is controlled by proportional A) The power curve shall be an ideal led by proportional 1 valve (PSV-P1). curve. valve. P2 pump is controlled by proportional B) Supply an optimum flow for each 2 valve (PSV-P2). operation. The travel straight valve is controlled • Make the changeover soft. 3 by proportional valve (PSV-C). The bypass cut valve P1 and P2 are • Make the changeover soft. 4 controlled by proportional valve Part of the (PSV-D) and (PSV-B) respectively. control valve is controlled by the The arm variable recirculation valve • Control the arm speed as you de- proportional valve. 5 is controlled by proportional valve sire. (PSV-A). ATT boost is controlled by solenoid The main spool 6 valve (SV-2). is controlled hydraulically. The open and close actions of the 7 swing P/B are controlled by solenoid valve (SV-1). Unload valve is controlled by propor- A) Travel speed keeping at travel 8 tional valves (PSV-E) and (PSV-F). straight. B) Pressure releasing of main circuit.

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-2 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Line coding for control system circuit ELECTRIC: CONTROLLER INPUT SIGNAL 678 HYDRAULIC: PILOT SECONDARY PRESSURE SOLENOID PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE PILOT PRIMARY PRESSURE MAIN CIRCUIT : GOVERNOR MOTOR : ENGINE SPEED SENSOR : HIGH PRESSURE SENSOR (P1, P2: 2 pcs) : LOW PRESSURE SENSOR (ATT: 7 pcs, Travel: 2 pcs) : ACCEL DIAL POTENTIOMETER

BOOM CYLINDER BOOM UP CONFLUX PL 1 BOOM DOWN REVERSE REVERSE Pis PB 1 5 PCb 7 2 3 E265-E305 ARM CYLINDER ARM OUT CONFLUX LH RH LH RH ARM IN CONFLUX VALVE CONFLUX BOOM CUT VALVE P1 BYPASS VALVE RECIRCULATION ARM VARIABLE PILOT VALVE PLOT ARM BUCKET BOOM FOR ATT SWING VALVE FOR OPT. VALVE BUCKET CYLINDER VALVE TRAVEL STRAIGHT TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL TRAVEL RIGHT VALVE CONFLUX ARM CUT VALVE P2 BYPASS P1 P2 SE - 9 8 6 FOR- FOR- 1 4 SE - 10 PTb PCa WARD WARD PA 1 GAUGE CLUSTER LOW PRESSURE SENSOR DISPLAY SE - 4 4 A / W / HM SELECT SE - 3 SWING MOTOR PARKING BRAKE RELEASE LOWER SW. 3 SE - 2 2 UNLOAD SENSOR SE - 1 VALVE TRAVEL MOTOR 1,2-SPEED SELECT BLOCK 1 SE - 8 8 SE - 7 PSV-E PSV-F 7 ATT. TRAVEL. UNLOAD UNLOAD PROPORTIONAL 6 UNLOAD VALVE BLOCK ACCEL DIAL OUTPUT VOLTAGE SE - 5 SE - 16 5 SERIAL COMMUNICATION HIGH PRESSURE SENSOR SE - 22 SE - 23 C-1 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM SERIAL COMMUNICATION MECHATRO CONTROLLER A1 A2 ENGINE A3 PROPORTIONAL VOLTAGE GOVERNOR SPEED SENSOR SE - 13 PROPORTIONAL VALVE/ SOLENOID VALVE BLOCK C-3 ENGINE CONTROLLER ATT BOOST P1 BYPASS CUT P2 BYPASS CUT TRAVEL STRAIGHT TRAVEL 1,2 SPEED SAFETY LOCK LEVER SWING PARKING BRAKE ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION PSV - P1 P1 PUMP SV-1 SV-3 PSV-A PSV-D PSV-C PSV-B SV-2 SV-4 PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P2 P2 PUMP PROPORTIONAL VALVE LEVER LOCK SW-11 VOLTAGE 24V R3057 T2-1-3 PROPORTIONAL COMMAND CURRENT Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-4 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM BOOM UP CONFLUX PILOT VALVE RECIRCULATION ARM VARIABLE P1 BYPASS CUT VALVE VALVE TRAVEL RIGHT TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL STRAIGHT BUCKET SWING BOOM ARM VALVE P2 BYPASS CUT VALVE CONFLUX CONFLUX VALVE VALVE BOOM ARM P2 P1 PB1 LOW PRESSURE SENSOR SE - 3 A2 A1 Pi P2 BYPASS CUT PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL Pi VALVE PSV - B BOOM UP SECONDARY PRESSURE BOOM UP Pi P2 PUMP PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL Pi VALVE PSV - P2 BOOM UP SECONDARY PRESSURE Pi P1 PUMP PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL Pi VALVE PSV - P1 BOOM UP SECONDARY PRESSURE MECHATRO CONTROLLER Pi ; PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE R0371

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-5 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Boom up conflux 1. Start boom up operation, and the boom up opera- tion pilot pressure switches boom spool and boom conflux spool, and inputs into low pressure sensor (SE-3). 2. The voltage output by low pressure sensor is input into mechatro controller, and the controller proc- esses the pilot signal and outputs the command corresponding to input voltage to P1, P2 pump and P2 bypass cut valve. 3. Each proportional valve puts out the secondary pressure for the pilot proportional valve according to command values from the mechatro controller, changes the delivery rates of the P1, P2 pump and switches the P2 bypass cut valve. 4. A pure hydraulic command switches the boom main spool and the boom conflux valve. A mechatro command switches the P1, P2 pumps and the P2 bypass cut valve. This causes the oil delivered by the P1 pump to combine with that by the P2 pump at boom up operation.

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-6 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM ARM IN RECIRCULATION & SEQUENCE CONFLUX PILOT VALVE RECIRCULATION ARM VARIABLE P1 BYPASS CUT VALVE VALVE TRAVEL RIGHT TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL STRAIGHT BUCKET SWING BOOM ARM VALVE P2 BYPASS CUT VALVE CONFLUX CONFLUX VALVE ARM VALVE BOOM P2 P1 LOW PRESSURE SENSOR SE - 23 SE - 2 SE - 7 HIGH PRESSURE SENSOR A2 A1 MECHATRO CONTROLLER Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P1 BYPASS CUT Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - D P2 PUMP PRESSURE Pi 200K PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS ARM VARIABLE Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - A P2 PUMP PRESSURE Pi 220K * PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS TRAVEL STRAIGHT Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - C P2 PUMP PRESSURE Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P1 PUMP Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P1 ARM IN PILOT SECONDARY PRESSURE Pi P2 PUMP PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL Pi VALVE PSV - P2 ARM IN PILOT SECONDARY PRESSURE Pi; PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE R3251 *: 220k for E265 and 300k for E305.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-7 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Arm in recirculation & sequence conflux Recirculation cut control 1. If load increases and the load pressure of the pump 3. When the travel straight valve is changed over, the rises above set pressure during arm in operation, parallel passage on the P1 side connects with the the output voltage of the high pressure sensor parallel passage on the P2 side. (SE-23) is put into the mechatro controller. When the P1 bypass cut valve is changed over, the The mechatro controller processes pilot signals oil delivered by the P1 pump is combined with that and puts out a command current that cuts off the by the P2 pump by arm operation. variable recirculation, to the variable recirculation proportional valve. 2. The variable recirculation proportional valve puts Recirculation control out secondary pilot pressure according to a com- mand current of the mechatro controller, brings 1. Start arm in operation, and arm operation pilot back the variable recirculation valve to the secondary pressure switches arm spool, and is recirculation cut position and blocks the input into low pressure sensor. recirculation passage. 2. The output voltage of the low pressure sensor is put into the mechatro controller. The mechatro control- ler processes the pilot signal and puts out a com- Sequence conflux control mand current according to the input voltage to the P2 pump proportional valve, and the variable 1. If load increases and the load pressure rises above recirculation proportional valve. set pressure during arm in operation, the mechatro controller processes a pilot signal and puts out a 3. Each proportional valve puts out secondary pilot command current to the travel straight proportional pressure according to a command current from the valve and the P1 bypass cut proportional valve mechatro controller and switches the delivery rate according to the secondary operating pilot pres- of the P2 pump. At the same time it switches the sure. variable recirculation valve of the control valve. 2. The travel straight proportional valve and the P1 4. The pure hydraulic command switches the arm bypass cut proportional valve put out the sec- main spool. Then a command from the mechatro ondary pilot pressure according to a command controller switches the P2 pump, and the variable current of the mechatro controller and switches recirculation valve. This causes the returned oil of the travel straight valve and the P1 bypass cut the arm cylinder rod side to be recirculated to the oil valve. delivered by the P2 pump.

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-8 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM ARM IN ANTI-CAVITATION CONTROL PILOT RECIRCULATION VALVE ARM VARIABLE P1 BYPASS CUT VALVE VALVE TRAVEL RIGHT TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL STRAIGHT BUCKET SWING BOOM ARM VALVE P2 BYPASS CUT VALVE CONFLUX CONFLUX VALVE VALVE BOOM ARM P2 P1 LOW PRESSURE SENSOR SE - 7 A2 A1 ACCEL POTENTIOMETER Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS ARM IN PILOT PRESSURE Pi VARIABLE ARM VARIABLE PILOT RECIRCULATION Pi RECIRCULATION SIGNAL PROCESS VALVE COMMAND VALVE PSV - A ENGINE SPEED (COMMAND VALUE) Pi P2 PUMP Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P2 ARM IN PILOT PRESSURE MECHATRO CONTROLLER Pi; PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE R0373 1. If the arm in is performed, the secondary pilot 4. Also, the mechatro controller puts out a command pressure for arm operation switches the arm spool current to the variable recirculation proportional and is put into the low pressure sensor (SE-7). valve according to the input voltage from the accel potentiometer. 2. An engine speed command put out from the accel- eration potentiometer is put into the mechatro 5. Each proportional valve puts out a secondary pilot controller. pressure according to a command current from the mechatro controller. This controls the variable 3. The output voltage from the low pressure sensor is recirculation valve to provide a spool stroke ac- put into the mechatro controller, and processes the cording to the engine speed and changes the pilot signal and puts out a command current ac- recirculation ratio. This holds down cavitation when cording to the input voltage to the P2 pump propor- the engine speed is low and the delivery rate of the tional valve. pumps is low.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-9 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM ARM OUT CONFLUX PILOT VALVE RECIRCULATION ARM VARIABLE P1 BYPASS CUT VALVE VALVE TRAVEL RIGHT TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL STRAIGHT BUCKET SWING BOOM ARM VALVE P2 BYPASS CUT VALVE CONFLUX CONFLUX VALVE VALVE ARM BOOM P2 P1 LOW PRESSURE SENSOR SE - 8 A2 A1 MECHATRO CONTROLLER Pi P1 BYPASS CUT Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - D ARM OUT PILOT SECONDARY PRESSURE Pi P2 PUMP Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P2 ARM OUT PILOT SECONDARY PRESSURE Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P1 PUMP Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P1 ARM OUT PILOT SECONDARY PRESSURE Pi; PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE R0374 1. Start arm out operation, and arm operation pilot 3. Each proportional valve puts out a secondary pilot pressure switches arm spool, arm conflux spool pressure according to a command current from the and is input into low pressure sensor (SE-8). mechatro controller, changes the delivery rate of the P1 and P2 pumps and switches the P1 bypass 2. The output voltage of the low pressure sensor is put cut valve of the control valve. into the mechatro controller. The mechatro control- ler processes pilot signals and puts out command 4. A pure hydraulic command switches the arm main current according to the input voltage to the P1, P2 spool and arm conflux spool. A mechatro com- pump proportional valves and the P1 cut propor- mand switches the P1, P2 pumps and the P1 tional valve. bypass cut valve. This causes the oil delivered by the P1 pump to combine with the oil delivered by the P2 pump during arm out operation.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-11 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Travel straight 1. Start ATTs work operations (boom, arm, bucket, P1 bypass cut valve command swing) in travel operation (right and left), and the pilot pressure switches respective spools, and is The P1 bypass cut valve does not operate if the boom input into respective low pressure sensors (SE-9) up operation is performed. During the arm and swing (SE-10). operation, the higher of the remote control pressures is selected to put out a select pressure. NOTE - Boom up operation is explained here. P2 bypass cut valve command Outputs switching command corresponding to boom up pilot pressure (Selection of the higher ATT pilot 2. If mechatro controller receives the input satisfying pressures from Control Value on P1 side during the following combination shown in Table, the operation) and the pressure selected by travel right controller determines it as travel straight, and the pilot pressure as high priority. travel straight signal turns on. ATT unload proportional valve command 3. After the travel straight signal has turned on, the signal is input to respective proportional valve Outputs switching command corresponding to pres- corresponding to the following commands. sure that is processed by boom up pilot pressure (Selection of the higher ATT pilot pressure on P1 side in operation) and right travel pilot pressure. Travel straight proportional valve command Travel unload proportional valve command Outputs switching command corresponding to boom up Outputs switching command corresponding to pres- pilot pressure sure that is processed by right and left travel pilot (Selection of the higher ATT pilot pressure in operation) pressure. Operating condition where travel straight signal turns on ATT operation Boom Bucket Arm Swing In travel right operation (P1) { { – – In travel left operation (P2) – – { {

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-13 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Swing priority control at Arm in (The forced recirculation position) 1. If swing operation is performed during arm in (or 5. Delivery oil of P2 pump flows into swing and arm arm in is performed during swing), the secondary sections of P2 side, but it flows preferentially into pilot pressure for arm operation switches arm spool swing side because the operation pressure of arm and swing spool. Respective pressure is simulta- cylinder is higher than swing side pressure. neously put into each low-pressure sensor (SE-7, SE-5). 6. On the other hand, as travel straight spool is shifted to travel straight position and P1 bypass cut spool 2. The output voltage of the low pressure sensor is put is switched, delivery oil of P1 pump flows into into the mechatro controller. parallel circuit of P2 side and confluxes with swing The mechatro controller processes pilot signals. circuit, and swing priority is accelerated. The command currents according to the input voltage are put out to the P1 pump proportional 7. By this operation, delivery oil of P2 pump preferen- valve(PSV-P1), P2 pump proportional valve (PSV- tially flows into swing side which pressure is lower P2), travel straight proportional valve (PSV-C), P1 than arm. bypass cut proportional valve (PSV-D) and the arm Therefore arm working speed keeps required variable recirculation valve (PSV-A). speed because recirculation oil is used to arm cylinder, and as P1 pump delivery oil confluxes with 3. Each proportional valve puts out a secondary pilot swing circuit, swing priority control is more avail- pressure according to a command current from the able. mechatro controller and switches the delivery rate of the P1&P2 pumps. At the same time, the pressure 8. If arm in or swing operation are performed, ener- moves the P1 bypass cut spool to full stroke posi- gized signal from mechatro controller to swing tion, and switches the arm variable recirculation parking brake solenoid valve (SV-1) is cut, and valve to the forced recirculation position. swing parking brake is released. 4. If arm in and swing operations are performed simultaneously, the return oil from rod side is recirculated while restrictor, and flows into head side because of the arm variable recirculation spool is shifted to forced recirculation position. Conse- quently the operation pressure of arm cylinder is risen.

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-14 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM PRESSURE DRAINING (RELEASING) CONTROL PILOT VALVE RECIRCULATION ARM VARIABLE P1 BYPASS CUT VALVE PILOT VALVE VALVE TRAVEL RIGHT TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL STRAIGHT FOR TRAVEL BUCKET BOOM SWING ARM (LEFT) (RIGHT) VALVE CONFLUX P2 BYPASS CUT VALVE CONFLUX VALVE ARM VALVE BOOM P1 P2 UNLOAD VALVE SE - 23 SE - 22 HYDRAULIC PRESSURE A2 A1 RELEASE ENGINE SWITCH PRESSURE RELEASING CONTROL Pi C-3 ENGINE ENGINE SPEED CONTROL CONTROLLER Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P2 PUMP Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P2 Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P1 PUMP Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P1 Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P1 BYPASS CUT Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - D Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P2 BYPASS CUT Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - B Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS ATT UNLOAD Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - E Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS TRAVEL UNLOAD Pi PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - F MECHATRO CONTROLLER Pi; PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE R2207

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-15 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Pressure draining (releasing) control 1. When the hydraulic pressure release switch is 3. The mechatro controller senses the output voltage switched, the mechatro controller performs the of the high pressure sensor of the main pump, following regardless of input signals (From opera- judges it as pump pressure and displays "DRAIN- tion pilot valve, accel potentiometer, etc.): ING HYD. PRESS" or "FAIL DRAIN HYD. PRESS" on the gauge cluster. a. Puts out a minimum tilting angle command to the P1 and P2 pump proportional valve (PSV-P1) 4. Since the unload valve is in the pressure releasing and (PSV-P2). position, the oil delivered by each pump is un- loaded to the tank passage. b. Puts out a command current for pressure releas- If the operating levers are operated and the spools ing control revolution to the electronic governor, switched, the pressure remaining in the actuators throught C-3 Engine controller. may be discharged. c. Puts out a command current for the pressure position switch to the attachment and travel unload proportional valve (PSV-E) and (PSV-F). d. Puts out a standby command current to the P1 bypass cut valve and the P2 bypass cut propor- tional valve (PSV-D) and (PSV-B). 2. A command current from the mechatro controller causes the following to occur: a. The pump proportional valve puts out a second- ary pilot pressure to the pump to minimize the tilting angle of the pump. b. The electronic governor controls the engine revo- lution to a pressure releasing control revolution. c. The attachment and travel unload proportional valve puts out a secondary pilot pressure to switch the unload valve to the pressure releas- ing position. d. The P1 bypass cut valve and the P2 bypass cut proportional valve put out a secondary pilot pressure to hold the P1 bypass cut valve and the P2 bypass cut valve in their standby position.

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-16 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM PUMP CONTROL (POSITIVE CONTROL & P-Q CONTROL) PILOT VALVE RECIRCULATION ARM VARIABLE P1 BYPASS CUT VALVE (LEFT) (RIGHT) VALVE TRAVEL RIGHT PILOT VALVE TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL STRAIGHT FOR TRAVEL BUCKET SWING BOOM ARM VALVE P2 BYPASS CUT VALVE CONFLUX CONFLUX VALVE VALVE BOOM ARM SE - 1 ~ SE - 8 SE - 10 SE - 9 HIGH PRESSURE SENSOR SE - 22 LOW SE - 23 A2 A1 PRESSURE SENSOR Pi Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS P2 PUMP P2 PUMP PROPORTIONAL PROPORTIONAL VALVE COMMAND VALVE PSV - P2 Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS Pi PILOT SIGNAL P1 PUMP P1 PUMP Pi PROCESS PROPORTIONAL PROPORTIONAL VALVE COMMAND VALVE PSV - P1 MECHATRO CONTROLLER R0378 Pi; PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-17 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Positive control P-Q control 1. If any operation performed, the secondary pilot 1. The output voltage of the high pressure sensor pressure switches the spools and is put into the low attached to each pump piping is put into the pressure sensors. mechatro controller, which processes pilot signals and computes command current according to input 2. The output voltage of the low pressure sensor is put voltage (load pressure). into the mechatro controller which processes pilot signals and puts out command current to the pro- 2. The lower of the command current computed by portional valve of each pump according to the input positive control and the command value (1) com- voltage. puted by P-Q control is selected and put out to the proportional valve of each pump as a command current. 3. The proportional valve of each pump puts out a secondary pilot pressure according to a command 3. The proportional valve of each pump puts out a current from the mechatro controller, switches the secondary pilot pressure according to a command tilting angle of the pump and controls the delivery current of the mechatro controller, switches the rate of the pump. tilting angle of the pump and controls the delivery rate of the hydraulic pressure. 4. This causes the delivery rate according to a lever stroke to be supplied to the actuator, thus an 4. This increases the load of the actuator, enabling operating speed according to a lever stroke is the engine to keep running even if the pump is achieved. highly loaded. POSITIVE CONTROL P - Q CONTROL PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS SECONDARY PRESSURE SECONDARY PRESSURE PUMP PROPORTIONAL PUMP PROPORTIONAL Pi Pi PILOT PRESSURE PUMP DELIVERY PRESSURE R0379 R0380

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-18 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM STANDBY FLOW CONSTANT CONTROL RECIRCULATION ARM VARIABLE P1 BYPASS CUT VALVE VALVE TRAVEL RIGHT TRAVEL LEFT TRAVEL STRAIGHT BUCKET SWING BOOM ARM VALVE P2 BYPASS CUT VALVE CONFLUX CONFLUX VALVE VALVE BOOM ARM P2 P1 ACCEL POTENTIOMETER SE - 16 A2 A1 Pi Pi P2 PUMP PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P2 ENGINE SPEED Pi P1 PUMP Pi PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PROPORTIONAL VALVE PSV - P1 ENGINE SPEED MECHATRO CONTROLLER Pi; PROPORTIONAL VALVE SECONDARY PRESSURE R0381

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-1-19 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM Standby flow constant control 1. An engine rotation command put out of the accel 4. If the engine speed increases an intermediate rpm, potentiometer is put into the mechatro controller. command current from the mechatro controller become constant, with the result that the delivery 2. The mechatro controller processes pilot signals rate of each pump rises linearly as the engine and puts out a command current to the proportional speed increases. valve of each pump so as to make the delivery rate of the pump constant when the engine speed is 5. The result is that the motion of the lever at the start below an intermediate rpm. of each operation becomes the same as that when a standby flow is available. Also, if the engine 3. The proportional valve of each pump puts out a revolution is increased, the operating feeling ac- secondary pilot pressure according to a command cording to each revolution is available. current of the mechatro controller, changes the tilting angle of the pump till the engine speed arrives at an intermediate rpm. PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS PILOT SIGNAL PROCESS SECONDARY PRESSURE PUMP DELIVERY RATE PUMP PROPORTIONAL Pi Q E/G SPEED E/G SPEED R0382 R0383

Copyright © New Holland T2-1-20 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROL SYSTEM NOTE:

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-1 MECHATRO CONTROLLER SUMMARY OF MECHATRO CONTROLLER Electro-hydraulic conversion information is displayed cation time may be changed over if the screen change on the multi display of the gauge cluster. However, the switch is pressed. mechatro display and the cumulative engine oil lubri- 3 8 1 4 2 7 5 R2234 1 - Safety lock lever 5 - Swing parking brake release switch 2 - Starter switch 7 - Pressure release switch 3 - Gauge cluster 8 - Power Boost button 4 - Accel dial

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-2 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER WORK MODE DISPLAY The work mode selector switch contains the fol- lowing functions 1. The work mode indicator lamp is switched W → HM → A... in order every time when the work mode switch is pressed. 2. Scrolling up of indicating items in trouble history display and canceling trouble history. 3. Scrolling up of time when changing E/G oil supply total hours. 4. At A (Attachment) mode, flow rate is increased. 5. Time displays are roll upped when correcting fuel 6 LOW E/G filter, hydraulic oil filter and hydraulic oil replace OIL PRESS interval. 6. Time displays is roll upped when adjusting clock, indicating time is increased. The buzzer stop switch contains the following functions R0385 1. Stops the warning sounding. 2. Display item rollbacked in service diagnosis opera- Screen change switch tion. 3. Display item rollbacked in trouble history opera- 1. Indicated items are scrolled up, when service tion. diagnosis is displayed. 4. Time display rollbacked when correcting E/G oil 2. In A (Attachment) mode, adjusting mode is taken. supply cumulative time. 5. At A (Attachment) mode, flow rate is decreased. 6. Time display are rollbacked when correcting fuel filter, hydraulic oil filter and hydraulic oil replace interval. 7. Time display is rollbacked when adjusting clock, indicating time is decreased.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-3 MECHATRO CONTROLLER 1. Display on LCD by the work mode switch Work mode Pattern System summary HM (Heavy and Mechatro) mode Display lamp Digging The mode is suited for heavy load HM ON Ditch digging work in which operating lever actions Trench box are recognized sensitively and the digging machine is operated at high speed with its priority laid on the rate of operation. Leveling The system recognizes the operator's Slope finishing action, automatically adjusts the ma- chine into four patterns shown on the left and causes the mode to flash. The below controls are performed as the result of judgment. Spreading • Engine revolution control • Pump control • Arm variable recirculation control • Boom conflux control Others • In all modes(standby and travel) 10 : 05 W (Working) mode Display The most suitable mode for keeping lamp balance between fuel consumption W ON and work efficiency. A (Attachment) mode Display Where the breaker and other require lamp a limit to the max. flow rate A ON • Operation in flow adjust mode 1. After the engine stops, turn the starter switch to (ON) and the mode switch to "A" and turn the screen change switch to (ON) for 3 to 10 sec. Then the adjust mode is available. 2. When the engine starts, 210 L/min is indicated in the primary stage. After that, the previous value is indicated. The value increases by 10 L/min each time the mode switch is pushed one time and decreases by 10 L/min each time the buzzer stop switch is pressed. 3. To release the adjust mode, turn the screen change switch to (ON) again.

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-4 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER 2. Display on LCD by the screen change switch The engine revolution and the cumulative hours from the engine oil change are indicated. LCD display Operating procedure Buzzer sound 10 : 05 (After the key switch is in ON (After 5 seconds, position, "FK" mark is displayed "Clock is displayed") on the multidisplay) 256Hr AFT 1515 RPM E/G OIL CH 256Hr AFT FUEL FIL CH Normal None display 256Hr AFT HYD FIL CH 256Hr AFT HYD OIL CH Note: If the screen change switch is pressed, the above six screen may be changed over.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-5 MECHATRO CONTROLLER The functions displayed on the multidisplay are 5. Trouble history display classified roughly into the following 8 types. Stores and displays the contents of the troubles detected through the mechatro self diagnosis. 1. Clock display After the engine starts, "NH" mark is displayed on 6. Mechatro A adjustment display the multidisplay and 5 seconds later it changes Displays it by procedure during the mechatro A to clock (In normal condition). adjustment. • • • • 2. CPU error display 7. Oil/filter supply cumulative time Display the error of the mechatro controller, etc. Displays the oil/filter supply cumulative time: 1. E/G oil 2. Fuel fiter 3. Hyd. oil filter 4. Hyd. oil. • • • • 3. Self-diagnosis display Displays the failure of the I/O (Input/Output) 8. Warning displays • system of the mechatro controller such as the In case the self diagnosis ( ) is normal but the • • • low pressure sensor, governor motor, propor- machine is faulty, or if the machine condition must tional valve, solenoid valve, etc. be notified to the operator, the below warning items are indicated each time it is necessary. 4. Service diagnosis display Displays the information output by the mechatro controller such as the pressure sensor detec- tion, proportional valve, solenoid valve, etc.

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-6 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER Warning displays item 1 10 29 CPU ! 2 11 32 PR 4 12 37 5 13 38 ! 6 14 NOTE - The buzzer sounds on display # 2, # 5, # 6 and 7. 15 In the case of # 5 and # 6, the buzzer is not stopped 7 even if the buzzer stop switch is pushed. In case of # 7, the buzzer is stopped if the buzzer stop switch is pressed. 9 19 In the case of # 2, the buzzer stops five seconds later automatically. 1 - Mechatro controller fail 12 - Low fuel level 2 - Swing parking disengaged 13 - Low hydraulic oil level 3 - E/G Preheat 14 - Low E/G cool level 5 - Preheat fail 15 - Low E/G oil level 6 - Low E/G oil press 19 - Power boost on 7 - High E/G cool temp 29 - Change E/G oil 9 - Air cleaner dirty 32 - Hydraulic system pressure discharge 10 - Overload boom oil pressure 37 - Warming up fuel filter 11 - Charging problem 38 - Presence of water in the fuel pre filter

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-7 MECHATRO CONTROLLER SELF DIAGNOSIS DISPLAY FUNCTION 1. Summary It performs self diagnosis of control inputs and the connector numbers and the pin numbers, refer outputs of pressure sensors and proportional to the C-1 Mechatro Controller which describes valves while the machine is in operation. Errors later. Wire numbers and colors may be confirmed coming out of the self diagnosis are displayed on on the electric circuit diagram or on the harnesses the multi display of the gauge cluster. Regarding diagram. 2. I/O configuration INPUT Pressure sensor SERIAL COMMUNICATION Control Proportional valve Gauge cluster Selector valve (SOL) (Buzzer alarm) Governor motor Battery relay 3. Self diagnosis display item No. Contents Display of monitor No. Contents Display of monitor 1 Mechatro controller fail 1. MECHATRO 18 P2 bypass cut D-2 P2 BYPASS CP U CONT. FAIL propo-valve fail PSV PROPO-VALVE 2 Gauge cluster → Mechatro con- I-1 RECEIVE 19 Travel priority D-3 TRAVEL troller communication failure ERROR propo-valve fail PSV PROPO-VALVE 3 Battery relay fail I-2 BAT. 20 Arm variable recirculation D-6 RECIRCULAT RELAY propo-valve fail PSV PROPO-VALVE 4 ROM data A-1 ROM DATA 21 Travel unload D-17 TRAVEL CP U FAILURE propo-valve fail PSV UNLOAD PSV 5 Mechatro set error A-2 MECHATRO 22 Attachment unload D-18 ATT CP U SET ERROR propo-valve fail PSV UNLOAD PSV 6 Boom raising pressue B-1 BOOM RAISE 23 P1 pump propo-valve E-1 PUMP P1 sensor fail SE SENSOR fail PSV PROPO-VALVE 7 Boom lowering pressue B-2 BOOM LOWER 24 P2 pump propo-valve E-2 PUMP P2 sensor fail SE SENSOR fail PSV PROPO-VALVE 8 Arm in pressure B-4 ARM IN 25 Power up solenoid F-1 POWER BOOST sensor fail SE SENSOR valve fail SV SOLENOID 9 Arm out pressure B-3 ARM OUT 26 Travel 2-speed solenoid F-3 TWO-SPEED sensor fail SE SENSOR valve fail SV SOLENOID 10 Bucket digging pressure B-5 BUCKET DIG 27 Swing parking solenoid F-2 SWING BRAKE sensor fail SE SENSOR valve fail SV SOLENOID 11 Bucket dump pressure B-6 BUCKET DUMP 30 E/G speed sensor fail G-3 E/G REV. sensor fail SE SENSOR RPM SENSOR 12 Swing pressure sensor B-7 SWING (R) 31 Accel potentio meter fail H-1 ACCELERATOR fail SE SENSOR POT POTENTIO 13 Travel right pressure B-9 TRAVEL (R) 32 Hydraulic pressure 32 DRAINING SE PR sensor fail SENSOR release stand by HYD. PRESS 14 Travel left pressure B-10 TRAVEL (L) 33 Hydraulic pressure 33 FAIL DRAIN SE PR sensor fail SENSOR release fail HYD. PRESS 15 P1 pump pressure C-1 PUMP P1 sensor fail SE SENSOR 16 P2 pump pressure C-2 PUMP P2 sensor fail SE SENSOR 17 P1 bypass cut D-1 P1 BYPASS propo-valve fail PSV PROPO-VALVE

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-8 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER SERVICE DIAGNOSIS The present service diagnosis in items is displayed on 3. Each time the screen change switch on the multidisplay according to the data received from the gauge cluster is pressed, the number the mechatro controller. runs like No. 2, No. 3 ... in order. 4. Each time the buzzer stop switch on the How to display switch panel is pressed, the number re- 1. Keep the buzzer stop switch pressing, turn the turns like No. 25, No. 24 ... in order. starter switch (ON) and starts the engine. 5. The display disappears only when the starter 2. The 1st item Parts No. of Mechatro controller and switch is turned OFF. the program version are displayed. (Example) No. 1 MAIN CONTROLLER P/No. LB22E............... PROGRAM VERSION VER............... Service diagnosis indication Display Remarks Display Remarks No. 1 No. 7 MAIN CONT. P/No. SOL. VALVE LB22E.................. P/No. indication F-1 POWER UP PROGRAM VER Version indication COMP. OFF ON/OFF indication VER.................. MEAS. OFF ON/OFF indication SWITCH OFF ON/OFF indication No. 2 E/G SET 2100 No load set rpm No. 8 MEAS 2100 Actual rpm RELAY E/G PRS. LIVE LIVE/DEAD indication I-2 BAT. RELAY Sensor voltage / KPSS SW W W / H / A indication COMP. ON Pressure converted value (C indication MEAS. ON Sensor voltage / at mode cancel) KEY SWITCH ON Pressure converted value No. 3 No. 9 H-1 PRESS. SENSOR ACCEL VOLT. 4.9V Potentio voltage B-1 BOOM RAISE Sensor voltage / POS. 100% Voltage position 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value MOTOR STEP 420 No of motor steps B-2 BOOM LOWER Sensor voltage / POS. 100% Step position 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value No. 5 No. 10 SOL. VALVE PRESS. SENSOR Sensor voltage / F-2 SWING-BRAKE B-3 ARM OUT Pressure converted value COMP. ON ON/OFF indication 4.5V 3.0M Sensor voltage / MEAS. ON ON/OFF indication B-4 ARM IN Pressure converted value RELEASE SW OFF ON/OFF indication 4.5V 3.0M No. 6 SOL. VALVE F-3 1/2-TRAVEL COMP. OFF ON/OFF indication MEAS. OFF ON/OFF indication SWITCH OFF ON/OFF indication

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-9 MECHATRO CONTROLLER Display Remarks Display Remarks No. 11 No. 23 PRESS. SENSOR PROPO-VALVE B-5 BUCKET DIG Sensor voltage / D-6 A-RECIRCULAT Command current / 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value COMP. 538mA 1.8M Pressure converted value B-6 BUCKET DUNP Sensor voltage / MEAS. 538mA 1.8M Feedback current / 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value Pressure converted value (Arm in at no load) No. 12 No. 24 PRESS. SENSOR PROPO-VALVE B-7 SWING (R) Sensor voltage / E-1 P1 PUMP Command current / 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value COMP. 770mA 3.0M Pressure converted value B-8 SWING (L) Sensor voltage / MEAS. 770mA 3.0M Feedback current / 0V 0M Pressure converted value POWER SHIFT 0mA Pressure converted value No. 13 No. 25 PRESS. SENSOR PROPO-VALVE B-9 TRAVEL (R) Sensor voltage / E-2 P2 PUMP Command current / 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value COMP. 770mA 3.0M Pressure converted value B-10 TRAVEL (L) Sensor voltage / MEAS. 770mA 3.0M Feedback current / 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value POWER SHIFT 0mA Pressure converted value No. 14 No. 39 PRESS. SENSOR MECHATRO ADJT. C-1 PUMP P1 Sensor voltage / CONT. SW TEST RUN/TEST indication 3.3V 3.5M Pressure converted value CONT. VOL 50% 50% fixed indication C-2 PUMP P2 Sensor voltage / PROG. SW OFF ON/OFF indication 3.3V 3.5M Pressure converted value No. 15 No. 40 PRESS. SENSOR RELEASE SW B-16 P1 OPT. Sensor voltage / KPSS OFF OFF fixed indication 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value SWING BRAKE OFF ON/OFF indication B-17 P2 OPT. Sensor voltage / 4.5V 3.0M Pressure converted value No. 20 No. 47 PROPO-VALVE PROPO-VALVE D-1 P1 CUT Command current / D-17 TRVL UNLOAD Command current / COMP. 706mA 2.7M Pressure converted value COMP. 665mA 2.6M Pressure converted value MEAS. 706mA 2.7M Feedback current / MEAS. 665mA 2.6M Feedback current / Pressure converted value Pressure converted value (Arm out relief) No. 21 No. 48 PROPO-VALVE PROPO-VALVE D-2 P2 CUT Command current / D-18 ATT UNLOAD Command current / COMP. 706mA 2.7M Pressure converted value COMP. 665mA 2.6M Pressure converted value MEAS. 706mA 2.7M Feedback current / MEAS. 665mA 2.6M Feedback current / Pressure converted value Pressure converted value (Boom up relief) No. 22 PROPO-VALVE D-3 S-TRAVEL Command current / COMP. 672mA 2.5M Pressure converted value MEAS. 672mA 2.5M Feedback current / Pressure converted value (Arm in relief) NOTE - The examples of displays are in the W mode with the engine at Hi and with the operating lever to full stroke.

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-10 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER TROUBLE HISTORY DIAGNOSIS The error item detected by the self-diagnosis is stored 5. To erase the display, turn the starter switch to in the mechatro controller as a history and is displayed (OFF). on the multidisplay. How to cancel the contents of the trouble history How to display 1. Display the trouble history mode. 1. Turn the starter switch (ON). 2. Press the work mode select switch and the buzzer 2. Press the buzzer stop switch 5 times in sequence stop switch for 10 seconds or more concurrently. for 10 seconds. 3. When the erasing is completed, the "NO ERROR" (Example) is displayed. Contents Display 4. Turn the starter switch (OFF). No errors NO ERROR NOTE - All the stored items are erased. 00025H It is impossible to erase data partially. Error detected B-10 TRAVEL LEFT in the past D-2 P2 BYPASS CUT F-3 TRAVEL 1.2-SPEED 3. Transmits the error data (one or many) and hour meter to the gauge cluster. • Hour meter and 3 error data are displayed on the screen. • If three error data or more exist, display the data three by three in order for every 5 seconds. 4. Scrolling pages (Item number) • The item number increases each time the work mode select switch is pushed. • The item number decreases each time the buzzer stop switch is pushed. NOTE - The system stores all error items at each hour meter reading. To check error items at different hour meter readings, push the work mode select switch or the buzzer stop switch.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-11 MECHATRO CONTROLLER Contents of the trouble history Symbol Display A Controller relation A-1 PUMP P1 SENSOR A-2 PUMP P2 SENSOR B-1 BOOM RAISE SENSOR B-2 BOOM LOWER SENSOR B-3 ARM OUT SENSOR B-4 ARM IN SENSOR B Low pressure sensor B-5 BUCKET DIG SENSOR B-6 BUCKET DUMP SENSOR B-7 SWING (R) SENSOR B-9 TRAVEL (R) SENSOR B-10 TRAVEL (L) SENSOR High pressure sensor C-1 PUMP P1 SENSOR C (Hydraulic pump) C-2 PUMP P2 SENSOR D-1 P1 BYPASS PROPO-VALVE D-2 P2 BYPASS PROPO-VALVE Proportional valve D-3 TRAVEL PROPO-VALVE D (Control valve) D-6 RECIRCULAT PROPO-VALVE D-17 TRAVEL UNLOAD D-18 ATT UNLOAD Proportional valve E-1 PUMP P1 PROPO-VALVE E (Hydraulic pump) E-2 PUMP P2 PROPO-VALVE F-1 POWER BOOST SOLENOID F Solenoid valve F-2 SWING BRAKE SOLENOID F-3 TWO-SPEED SOLENOID G-3 E/G REV. SENSOR G E/G Accessory G-4 E/G COOL. G-5 E/G OIL PRS H Potentio relation H-1 ACCELERATOR POTENTIOMETER I-1 RECEIVE ERROR I I-2 BAT. RELAY I-3 NO. 4 CABLE DISCONNECTED MONITOR SYSTEM OK

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-12 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER HOW TO CORRECT THE CUMULATIVE TIME 1. The method of cumulative time indication change 2. Corrective action is described on page T2-2-4. For example, correction method of engine oil sup- ply cumulative time is described in following. Procedure Operating procedure Display on multidisplay (Normal) A Turn the starter switch on. is displayed, and after 5 seconds display changes to clock. Press the gauge cluster screen change Press once B switch once, and the E/G speed (rpm) is 10 : 05 2000 RPM displayed. E/G speed is displayed Press once more, and the engine oil sup- C Press once 100 Hr AFT ply cumulative time screen is displayed. 2000 10 :RPM 05 10 : 05 E/G OIL CH Press the screen change switch and re- 100 Hr AFT 100 Hr AFT 100 Hr AFT D lease in the range of 3 to 10 seconds, it E/G OIL CH FUEL FIL CH E/G OIL CH returns to the correction mode. Press the work mode selector switch and 100 Hr AFT Cumulative time 101 Hr AFT E the cumulative time increases. (once 1 Hr) E/G OIL CH increases E/G OIL CH Press the Buzzer stop switch, the cumula- 100 Hr AFT Cumulative time 99 Hr AFT F tive time decreases. (once 1 Hr) E/G OIL CH decreases E/G OIL CH Press the gauge cluster screen change switch once, the correcting time is stored, Complete the 99 Hr AFT 100 Hr AFT G and exits from the correction mode and E/G OIL CH correction FUEL FIL CH "Fuel filter supply cumulative time" is dis- played to complete the correction. NOTES 1. Press screen change switch on the procedure D or later once, and the status is stored and the correction is finished. 2. When altering the accumulated elapsed time of fuel filter, hydraulic oil filter and hydraulic oil respectively, press the screen change switch and display the accumulated time screen corresponding to items required to be altered, then repeat the procedures D to G. 3. The engine oil change time is displayed by 500 hours for warning on the display, but no buzzer sounds. 4. For fuel filter, hydraulic oil filter and hydraulic oil, press the screen change switch, and the "Hours elapsed after change" is displayed on the display, but no warning displays and no buzzer sounds. 5. The display time is 4 digits for hydraulic oil, and 3 digits for others. • • • • The display time can be returned to zero by simultaneously pressing " " selector switch and " " buz- zer stop switch.

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-13 MECHATRO CONTROLLER CONTRAST OF DISPLAY ADJUSTING PROCEDURE If buzzer stop switch and mode switch are pressed at the same time for 5 to 10 seconds, the contrast adjusting mode is appeared and the contrast of dis- play becomes adjustable, but except the following conditions: Under (Adjustment) and (Service diagnosis) 1. Contrast enhancement Press the mode switch: LCD indication is enhanced. Press the buzzer stop switch: LCD indication becomes dim. 2. Contrast complete Press the screen change switch, consequently the mode is set for required contrast level. 22 : 00 CONTRAST 50

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-14 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER MECHATRO CONTROL EQUIPMENT C-1 Mechatro controller 1. Outside view 2 1 6 21 4 2 18 2 1 10 16 26 34 27 22 18 16 12 28 22 1 (CN35F) 2 (CN36F) 3 (CN37F) 4 (CN38F) 13 2 18 2 1 11 2 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (CN35F) (CN36F) (CN37F) (CN38F) (CN39F) (CN40F) (CN41 F) 26 14 16 9 22 12 5 (CN39F) 6 (CN40F) 7 (CN41F) R0386 2. List of connectors HARNESS MECHATRO CONTROLLER Wire Code Connector Pin Specification IN/OUT Signal level No. No. No. PUT 952 1 Ground 0V 502 2 Boom up pressure sensor (SE-3) IN 0.5~4.5V 902 3 Power source 5V 903 4 Power source 5V 503 5 Boom down pressure sensor (SE-4) IN 0.5~4.5V 953 6 Ground 0V 954 7 Ground 0V 504 8 Arm in pressure sensor (SE-7) IN 0.5~4.5V 904 9 Power source 5V 905 10 Power source 5V 505 11 Arm out pressure sensor (SE-8) IN 0.5~4.5V 955 12 Ground 0V 950 13 Ground 0V 500 14 Bucket digging pressure sensor (SE-1) IN 0.5~4.5V 900 15 Power source 5V 901 1 16 Power source 5V 501 (CN35F) 17 Bucket dump pressure sensor (SE-2) IN 0.5~4.5V 951 18 Ground 0V 957 19 Ground 0V 507 20 Swing pressure sensor (SE-5) IN 0.5~4.5V 907 21 Power source 5V 550 22 Engine oil level (SW-23) IN GND / OPEN – 23 – – – 24 – – 958 25 Ground 0V 508 26 Travel right pressure sensor (SE-9) IN 0.5~4.5V 908 27 Power source 5V 909 28 Power source 5V 509 29 Travel left pressure sensor (SE-10) IN 0.5~4.5V 959 30 Ground 0V – 31 – – – 32 – – – 33 – – – 34 – –

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-2-15 MECHATRO CONTROLLER HARNESS MECHATRO CONTROLLER Wire Code Connector Pin Specification IN/OUT Signal level No. No. No. PUT 967 1 Ground 0V 517 2 Accel potentiometer (SE-16) IN 0.5~4.5V 917 3 Power source 5V 915 4 Power source 5V 515 5 P1 pump pressure sensor (SE-22) IN 0.5~4.5V 965 6 Ground 0V 966 7 Ground 0V 516 8 P2 pump pressure sensor (SE-23) IN 0.5~4.5V 916 9 Power source 5V 913 10 Power source 5V 513 2 11 P1 OPT. pressure sensor (SE-20) IN 0.5~4.5V 963 (CN36F) 12 Ground 0V 964 13 Ground 0V 514 14 P2 OPT. pressure sensor (SE-11) IN 0.5~4.5V 914 15 Power source 5V – 16 – – – 17 – – – 18 – – – 19 – – 580 20 581 21 Engine revolution sensor (SE-13) OUT GND SH-2 22 Shield – 1 – – 600 2 Key SW. (ON) IN +24V / OPEN 34A 3 Grid heater relay (R-3) IN +24V / OPEN – 4 – – – 545 5 Swing P/B release SW. (SW-4) IN GND / OPEN 65B 6 Alternator voltage IN ~12V/12V~ 540 7 Load momentum alarm (SW-39) IN GND / OPEN 547 3 8 Engine water temp. relay (R-30) IN GND / OPEN 548 (CN37F) 9 E/G oil pressure relay (R-29) IN GND / OPEN 549 10 Air filter clogger SW. (SW-8) IN GND / OPEN 591 11 OPT. press. (SW-44) IN GND / OPEN – 12 – – – 551 13 E/G coolant level (SW-24) IN GND / OPEN 552 14 Hyd. oil level (SW-25) IN GND / OPEN 553 15 Fuel level (SE-15) IN 670/1140(Ω) 557 16 Wiper rise-up limit switch IN GND / OPEN 558 1 Wiper reverse limit switch IN GND / OPEN 542A 2 ATT power boost SW. (SW-21) IN GND / OPEN 130 3 Heavy lift SW. (SW-35) IN GND / OPEN 120 4 Quick coupler SW. (SW-40) IN GND / OPEN E27 5 No. 4 connector detect signal IN GND / OPEN 87A 6 Safety lever lock SW. (SW-11) IN +24V / OPEN 622A 7 Extra switch (SW-55/56) IN GND / OPEN 559 8 Wiper inter-lock (SW-19) IN GND / OPEN – 9 – – – – 10 – – – – 11 – – – 70C 12 Fuel filter heater relay (R-23) – – 620 13 Water separator restrictor (SW-47) – – – 4 14 – – – 572 (CN38F) 15 Pressure drain SW. (SW-50) IN GND / OPEN 708 16 Wiper spark relay OUT GND / OPEN 709 17 Wiper forward relay OUT GND / OPEN 710 18 Wiper reverse relay OUT GND / OPEN 711 19 Washer motor relay OUT GND / OPEN – 20 – – – – 21 – – – – 22 – – – – 23 – – – – 24 – – – 391 25 Engine stop relay (R-31) OUT GND / OPEN – 26 – – – 781 27 Accell 1 to engine controller OUT 0~4.5V 780 28 IN GND

Copyright © New Holland T2-2-16 E265-E305 MECHATRO CONTROLLER HARNESS MECHATRO CONTROLLER Wire Code Connector Pin Specification IN/OUT Signal level No. No. No. press. SW. (SW-43) IN GND / OPEN – 13 IN GND / OPEN 770 14 (Orbcomm power) (CN-6M conn) OUT GND / OPEN 752 15 OUT – ATT unload proportional solenoid (PSV-E) 753 16 OUT – 754 17 OUT – Travel unload proportional solenoid (PSV-F) 755 18 OUT – 616 19 Download change SW. (CN-6M conn) OUT GND / OPEN 776 20 RS-232C communication 615 21 Download/Orbcomm (CN-6M conn) RS-232C communication 984 22 OUT GND

Copyright © New Holland E265-305 T2-3-1 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT SUMMARY The hydraulic circuits are built up with the following ability, safety, mass volume handling and low fuel functions and features in order to achieve easy oper- consumption.

59 MPa to 5 MPa ( ) Primary pilot pressure: oil pressure 3.4 MPa to 5 MPa ( ) Main pump drive pressure: oil pressure 5 MPa to 34.3 MPa With power boost operating: oil pressure 37.7 MPa NOTE - The hydraulic schematic diagram shown is related to E-265 model. The E-305 hydraulic schematic differs only in few details, but the operations description are the same. For the differences, make reference to the attached hydraulic schematic diagram. NOTE - Regarding the electrical symbols in this manual, refer to the electric circuit diagram.

4 3 23 22 E265-305 1 21 TRAVEL MOTORS SWING MOTOR PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 24 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 SV-4 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 SV-2 ATT. BOOSTING 7 PSV-B P2 BY-PASS CUT 6 20 PSV-C P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT PSV-D P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 29 26 PSV-A ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION SV-3 TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER NEUTRAL CIRCUIT: Positive control function at safety lock lever down (unlocked position) SV-1 SWING P/B 30 R3059 T2-3-3 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-3-4 E265-305 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT NEUTRAL CIRCUIT This section describes the following: On the regulator attached on the pump, the spool (652) through piston (643) is pushed leftward, and stops at 1. Safety lock lever and pilot circuit. the position where being in proportion to the force of 2. Pump positive flow control. pilot spring (646). 3. Pump P-Q (Pressure-Quantity) curve control. The tank port connected to the large diameter of servo piston (532) opens, and the piston moves leftward by delivery pressure P1 of the small bore resulting in the increase of tilt angle (αα ). 1. SAFETY LOCK LEVER AND PILOT CIRCUIT The servo piston (532) and the sleeve of the spool (652) are connected to feedback lever (611), and servo Purpose: piston moves to leftward according to the spool (652) moves to rightward by motion of the feed back lever. To protect attachment from unexpected motion for By this movement of the spool, opening of spool and safety. sleeve begin to close gradually and servo piston stands still at full closed position. Principle: Cut pressure source of pilot valve for operation. <Flow rate reduction operation (Eg. P1 pump)> As the current value I of mechatro controller reduces, Operation: the secondary pressure of solenoid proportional valve If the safety lock lever is turned forward after the reduces, and spool (652) is moved rightward by the engine starts, the limit switch (SW-11) is turned on. force of pilot spring (646). With the movement of spool, The timer relay is actuated one second later which the delivery pressure P1 usually flows into the large causes the solenoid (SV-4) of the solenoid valve diameter of servo piston (532) through the spool (652). block (14) to be energized and makes the pilot operating circuit to stand by. 2. PUMP POSITIVE FLOW CONTROL Type: Electric flow controlled variable displacement pump. Principle: The current command I to the pump's solenoid proportional valve controls the delivery rate of the pump. PSV -P1 PSV -P2 Operation: <Flow rate rise operation (Eg. P1 pump)> By operating any of control levers, the operating secondary pressure of pilot valve rises, and the rising pressure is transformed to the rise of 611 output voltage corresponding to the pressure input by the low pressure sensor. Mechatro con- troller signal-processes this change of voltage, 643 resulting in rise of command current value I to the pump proportional solenoid valve and conse- 646 652 quently the pump flow rate rises. This is called 532 Positive Control System . 12 As the pump command current value I rises, the secondary pressure of proportional solenoid valve R3265 also rises.

Copyright © New Holland E265-305 T2-3-5 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT The delivery pressure flows in the small diameter of servo piston, but the servo piston moves rightward due to the difference of area, resulting in the reduction of α). Similarly, when the servo piston (532) tilt angle(α moves rightward, the spool (652) is moved leftward by the feedback lever (611). The operation is maintained until the opening of spool and sleeve are closed. 3. PUMP P-Q CURVE CONTROL OPERATION Type: Electrical flow control type variable pump. Principle: Perform an operation of the value from pump high pressure sensor to P-Q curve control value, and send a command to the pump solenoid proportional valve. Operation: The pump high pressure sensor converts the pres- sure to the output voltage corresponding to the pump delivery pressure. The mechatro controller converts the voltage output by the high pressure sensor to the P-Q curve control value. On the other hand, select the pump positive control command current value from the low pres- sure sensor in lower order, and the values are output to respective pump proportional valve as a com- mand current. With this operation, the pump power is controlled so as not to be exceed the engine power, therefore engine dose not stall.

4 T2-3-6 23 22 1 21 4 PSV-E PSV-F 9 3 2 19 18 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 ATT. BOOSTING 7 TRAVEL CIRCUIT (E265): 2nd speed travel, simultaneous operations P2 NEUTRAL CUT 6 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 NEUTRAL CUT 28 27 29 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3060 E265 Copyright © New Holland

4 E305 23 22 21 1 3 PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 17 15 13 31 10 25 20 SOL/V BLOCK 14 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT SAFETY LOCK LEVER 8 7 ATT BOOST PRESSURE TRAVEL CIRCUIT (E305): 2nd speed travel, simultaneous operations 6 P2 BY-PASS CUT 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 BY-PASS CUT 29 28 27 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3061 T2-3-7 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-3-8 E265-305 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT TRAVEL CIRCUIT This section describes the following: 2. 2nd SPEED TRAVEL SOLENOID COMMAND CIRCUIT AND AUTO 1. Travel forward pilot simultaneous operation circuit. 1st SPEED RETURN FUNCTION 2. 2nd speed travel solenoid command circuit and auto 1st speed return function. Purpose: 3. Travel main circuit. Change travel motor speed with switch. 4. Travel motor function. Principle: If the switch is turned, an electric signal is issued. 1. TRAVEL FORWARD PILOT It excites the travel 1-2 speed changeover solenoid SIMULTANEOUS OPERATION CIRCUIT (SV-3) which in turn converts the primary pilot pressure and the self pressure to a tilting angle of Purpose: the variable displacement motor. Light operating force and shockless operation. Operation: Mechatronics If the rabbit marked switch on the gauge cluster is pressed, the solenoid (SV-3) of the proportional 1. If the travel lever with damping mechanism is valve block (14) is excited and changes the propor- operated for travel right, left and forward motions, tional valve. Then the solenoid command pressure the secondary pilot proportional pressure comes is issued from A7 port, enters the P port of the travel out of the 1 and 3 ports of pilot valve (11). The higher motor (4), opens the oil passage to the 2nd speed of the pressures is selected, comes out of the 5 and select piston, and causes the motor to run in the 2nd 6 ports and acts upon the low pressure sensors (SE- speed tilting mode by its self pressure. However, 9) and (SE-10). when the main circuit pressure rises above 2. The pilot secondary pressure flows to PAr and PAL 27.4 MPa, the motor's self pressure pushes the 2nd ports of the control valve (2), moves the travel speed select piston back to the 1st speed. spool, and switches the main circuit. The other hand, travel straight valve (24) is switched simultaneously to full stroke position at 3. TRAVEL MAIN CIRCUIT one stroke. 3. The voltage output by low pressure sensors (SE-9, Operation: SE-10) is input to the mechatro controller and The delivery oil from Pump A1 and A2 ports by signal-processed, and the mechatro controller out- changing the travel spool with the operation of puts the increased flow rate current to P1 pump travel pilot flows in each P1 and P2 for E265 (VA and proportional valve (PSV-P1) and P2 pump propor- VB for E305) port on the right and left sides of travel tional valve (PSV-P2). motor (4) through C, D ports of swivel joint (9) from 4. P1 and P2 pump proportional valves increase the AL, Ar ports of control valve (2), and rotates the flow rate by the pump positive control operation. travel motor. (Refer to paragraph "Pump Positive Flow Con- trol".) 5. If sensors sense the operation of travel, mechatro 4. TRAVEL MOTOR FUNCTION controller processes the signal according to output voltage of low pressure sensors, and the signal Function: current are imputed from controller to ATT and 1. Prevents the motor from over running on a slope. Travel unload valve (PSV-E, PSV-F) (21), conse- 2. Check valve that prevents cavitation of the hydrau- quently unload valve (22-23) is switched to unload lic motor. position. Then travel lever is operated, the unload valve 3. Shockless relief valve and anti cavitation valve (22-23) is switched from unload position to full when inertia force stops. stroke position in proportion to the movement of 4. High/Low 2 step speed change mechanism and travel lever. In this time, travel straight valve auto 1st speed return at high load. (PSV-C) returns to neutral position in inversely proportion to the movement of travel lever. 5. Travel parking brake.

4 3 22 E265-305 23 1 21 TRAVEL MOTORS SWING MOTOR PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 24 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 SV-4 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK BUCKET CIRCUIT: Bucket digging, confluence and ATT boost 8 SV-2 ATT. BOOSTING 7 PSV-B P2 BY-PASS CUT 6 20 PSV-C P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT PSV-D P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 PSV-A 29 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION SV-3 TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SV-1 SWING P/B 30 R3062 T2-3-9 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-3-10 E265-305 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT BUCKET CIRCUIT This section describes the following: 3. CONSTANT CONTROL OF STANDBY FLOW RATE 1. Bucket digging pilot circuit. 2. Auto accel operation. Principle: 3. Constant control of stand-by flow rate. Outputs the current which maintains the pump 4. Bucket digging main circuit. delivery rate constant when operating in decel condition or the engine speed is intermediate or less. 1. BUCKET DIGGING PILOT CIRCUIT Operation: Even when the engine speed of accel potentiometer Mechatronics is in low speed, the flow rate equivalent to the above 1. When the operation for bucket digging is performed, decel speed and intermediate speed is delivered. the pilot proportional secondary pressure is deliv- With this function, the actuator actuates before the ered through port 1 of the right pilot valve (10), flows control lever is moved and reached to the required to PBc port of the control valve (2), and acts on the angle. low pressure sensor (SE-1), and at the same time the bucket spool is switched. 2. The voltage output by the low pressure sensor (SE- 4. MAIN CIRCUIT FOR BUCKET DIGGING 1) sent to the mechatro controller and is signal- processed, and then the mechatro controller out- Operation: puts the command current to increase the pump With the pilot operation, the bucket spool is flow rate to solenoid proportional valve (PSV-P1) on switched, the pressure oil is supplied to (H) side of the P1 pump side. P1 pump proportional valve bucket cylinder (8) through Bc port of control valve increases the flow rate by the pump positive control (2). On the other hand, the return oil from (R) side of operation. (Refer to paragraph "Pump Positive Flow bucket cylinder (8) is restricted by bucket spool and Control".) returns to the tank circuit through Ac port of control valve (2). 2. AUTO ACCEL OPERATION Principle: Start operating with signal output by low pressure sensor. Operation: <Lever in neutral position> If no signal is sent out to the low pressure sensor for more than 4 seconds even if the accel dial is turned to MAX, the engine revolution is set to 1050 rpm. <Lever in operation position> If a pressure signal of 0.56 MPa or over enters the low pressure sensor of the machine with standard specifications (travel, bucket, boom, swing and arm), a proportional voltage signal from the low pressure sensor enters the mechatro controller and brings the engine revolution back to the accel dial setting according to the lever strokes.

4 3 23 22 E265-305 1 21 TRAVEL MOTORS SWING MOTOR PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 24 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 BOOM CIRCUIT: Boom up operation, confluence function SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 SV-4 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 SV-2 ATT. BOOSTING 7 PSV-B P2 BY-PASS CUT 6 20 PSV-C 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P1 BY-PASS CUT P2 BY-PASS CUT PSV-D P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 29 26 PSV-A ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION SV-3 TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SV-1 SWING P/B 30 R3063 T2-3-11 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-3-12 E265-E305 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT BOOM CIRCUIT This section describes the boom raise conflux opera- 2. BOOM UP 2 PUMPS CONFLUX MAIN CIR- tion: CUIT IN CONTROL VALVE 1. Boom up pilot circuit. Purpose: 2. Boom up 2 pumps conflux main circuit in control valve. Boom up speed up. Principle: Confluxing oil from 2 pumps. 1. BOOM UP PILOT CIRCUIT Operation: Mechatronics: 1. The oil delivered through A1 port of P1 pump flows 1. If boom up operation is performed, the secondary into control valve (2) P1 port, and branches into pilot proportional pressure from the right pilot valve bypass circuit and parallel circuit. However since (10) gets out of port 4 and acts upon the low the boom spool is moved and bypass circuit is pressure sensor (SE-3). At the same time, the closed, the oil opens load check valve LCb through pressure acts upon the PAb and PB1 ports of parallel circuit and flows into boom spool. control valve (2). 2. Then the oil passes through boom spool, opens lock 2. The voltage output of the low pressure sensor (SE- valve of boom lock valve CRb, and is led into (H) 3) is put into the mechatro controller and processed. side of boom cylinders through control valve (2) Ab The controller then puts out a current command to port. the P2 bypass cut solenoid proportional valve 3. Meanwhile, the oil delivered from the A2 port of the (PSV-B). The valve puts out a secondary propor- P2 pump enters the P2 port of control valve (2) and tional pressure that acts upon the PCa port of the is branched to the bypass circuit and the parallel control valve (2). circuit. If the P2 bypass cut valve (29) is changed 3. Next, the secondary pressure which enters the PAb over, the center bypass circuit is closed. The oil port of the control valve (2) shifts the boom spool. then passes through the parallel circuit and via the The secondary pressure which enters the PB1 port restrictor on the circumference of the boom conflux shifts the boom conflux spool (25). spool (25), pushes the load check valve CCb open Meanwhile, the secondary solenoid proportional from the boom conflux circuit, and combines the oil pressure which enters the PCa port changes over delivered by the P1 pump internally. the P2 bypass cut valve (29). 4. The return oil from boom cylinder (R) side flows into tank circuit through boom spool from control valve (2) Bb port.

4 3 23 22 E265-E305 1 21 TRAVEL MOTORS SWING MOTOR PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 24 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 SV-4 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 SV-2 ATT. BOOSTING 7 PSV-B P2 BY-PASS CUT 6 20 PSV-C 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P1 BY-PASS CUT P2 BY-PASS CUT BOOM CIRCUIT: Boom down operation & prevention of natural boom falling PSV-D P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 29 26 PSV-A ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION SV-3 TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SV-1 SWING P/B 30 R3064 T2-3-13 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-3-14 E265-E305 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT This section describes boom down operation: When the boom spool is at neutral, the drain line on the lock valve CRb poppet spring chamber is 3. Boom down pilot circuit. closed which causes the poppet closed. 4. Prevention of natural fall by lock valve. The result is that the oil returning from the boom 5. Constant recirculation function of boom down main cylinder head (H) to the boom spool is held and circuit. makes the leakage from the boom spool zero. Thus the boom cylinder is prevented from making a natural fall. 3. BOOM DOWN PILOT CIRCUIT Mechatronics: 5. CONSTANT RECIRCULATION FUNCTION OF BOOM DOWN MAIN 1. If the boom down operation is performed, the sec- CIRCUIT ondary pilot proportional pressure comes out of port 2 of the right pilot valve (10) and acts upon the low Purpose: pressure sensor (SE-4). Prevention of cavitation during boom At the same time, the pressure is branched off into lowering motion. two lines and acts upon the PBb port and the PLc1 port of control valve (2). Principle: 2. The voltage output of the low pressure sensor The oil returning from the boom cylinder head (H) (SE-4) enters the mechatro controller and proc- is recirculated to the rod (R). essed in it. 3. Then, the proportional secondary pressure fed into Operation: control valve (2) PBb port switches boom spool. When the oil is supplied to the boom cylinder rod And the proportional secondary pressure flown into (R) side during boom down operation, the boom control valve (2) PLc1 port switches boom lock moves faster than it should do in some cases by the valve selector and release closed poppet CRb. self weight of the attachment. On that occasion, the circuit pressure on the rod (R) side is on the negative side. The oil supplied to the boom cylinder rod (R) flows 4. PREVENTION OF NATURAL FALL BY into the A1 port of the P1 pump and the P1 port of LOCK VALVE control valve. The oil then passes through the boom spool and goes out of the Bb port. Purpose: On that occasion, the oil returning from the head Prevention of natural fall when the lever is neutral. (H) goes through the recirculation path in the boom spool, pushes the check valve C in the spool open, Principle: is recirculated to the Bb port and is supplied to the rod (R). When the (R) pressure is larger than the The oil is prevented from returning to the boom (H) pressure, the check valve C closes. There- spool by the poppet seat of the boom lock valve. upon, the recirculation is stopped. Operation: In the boom down action, the selector valve is changed over by the boom down pilot pressure. Then the poppet spring chamber of the lock valve gets through the drain line (Drc) and makes the lock valve poppet open.

E265 4 23 22 1 21 4 PSV-E PSV-F 9 3 2 19 18 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 SWING CIRCUIT (E265): Swing operation (LH) 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 ATT. BOOSTING 7 P2 NEUTRAL CUT 6 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 NEUTRAL CUT 28 27 29 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3065 T2-3-15 Copyright © New Holland

4 23 22 T2-3-16 1 21 3 PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 17 15 13 SWING CIRCUIT (E305): Swing operation (LH) 31 10 25 20 SOL/V BLOCK 14 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT SAFETY LOCK LEVER 8 7 ATT BOOST PRESSURE 6 P2 BY-PASS CUT 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 29 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3066 E305 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-3-17 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT SWING CIRCUIT This section describes the following operations: 2. The mechanical brake is released if the swing parking solenoid is de-excited only when the sec- 1. Swing left pilot circuit. ondary operating pressure in the swing and arm in 2. Swing auto parking brake. actions acts upon any of the low pressure sensors (SE-5) or (SE-7). 3. Swing main circuit. 3. The swing parking solenoid (SV-1) is excited five 4. Swing motor circuit. seconds after the pressure of the swing low pres- sure sensor (SE-5) is reduced to zero. In the case of arm in operation, the swing parking solenoid (SV-1) is excited the moment the pres- 1. SWING LEFT PILOT CIRCUIT sure of the arm in low pressure sensor (SE-7) is reduced to zero. This causes the mechanical brake Mechatronics: to operate. 1. If the swing left action is performed, the secondary pilot pressure goes out of port 1 of left pilot valve (10) and acts upon the low pressure sensor (SE-5). At the same time, the pressure acts upon the PBs 3. SWING MAIN CIRCUIT port of C/V (2). 2. The low pressure sensor output voltage enters in Operation: the mechatro controller, and after signal processing The delivery oil through A2 port of P2 pump flows the mechatro controller outputs the command cur- into P2 port of the C/V (2) and is branched into the rent to P2 bypass cut solenoid proportional valve bypass circuit and parallel circuit, but the bypass (PSV-B), and the proportional valve secondary circuit is restricted with the movement of the swing pressure is discharged from this the solenoid valve spool, the pressure opens load check valve (LCs) and acts on PCa port of the C/V (2). through the parallel circuit flows into B port of the 3. Then, the secondary pressure entered into PBs port swing motor through Bs port of the C/V (2) and of the C/V (2) switches the slewing spool. And the rotates the swing motor counterclockwise. How- solenoid proportional valve secondary pressure ever, when starting swing operation, the oil flows out entered in PCa port switches the PS bypass cut in the tank circuit through P2 bypass cut valve from spool. the bleed off passage of the swing spool. The P2 bypass cut valve closes in late and consequently the swing hunting due to the control of the swing flow rate is prevented. 2. SWING AUTO PARKING BRAKE Purpose: 4. SWING MOTOR CIRCUIT Swing lock in neutral position and parking. 1. Anti cavitation circuit at swing deceleration. Principle: 2. Shockless relief valve that prevents the swing Release mechanical brake only when required to motor from being reversed. operate swing and arm in. Operation: 1. The swing parking system excites the swing park- ing soleniod (SV-1) usually if the key switch is turned in ON position and works by the action of the mechanical brake.

4 T2-3-18 function 23 22 21 1 4 PSV-E PSV-F 11 3 2 19 18 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 ATT. BOOSTING 7 P2 NEUTRAL CUT 6 20 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 NEUTRAL CUT 28 27 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION 29 TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3067 ARM CIRCUIT (E265): Arm in operation (light load), arm variable recirculation and anticavitation E265 Copyright © New Holland

4 E305 23 22 function 1 21 3 PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 17 15 13 31 10 25 20 SOL/V BLOCK 14 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT SAFETY LOCK LEVER 8 7 ATT BOOST PRESSURE 6 P2 BY-PASS CUT 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 26 29 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3068 ARM CIRCUIT (E305): Arm in operation (light load), arm variable recirculation and anticavitation T2-3-19 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-3-20 E265-E305 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT ARM CIRCUIT This section describes the following operations: 2. ARM IN, LIGHT-LOAD VARIABLE NORMAL RECIRCULATION MAIN CIRCUIT 1. Arm in, light-load operating pilot circuit. 2. Arm in, light-load variable normal recirculation main Operation: circuit. 1. The oil returning from the arm cylinder (R) pushes the arm lock valve CRa open and enters the arm variable recirculation spool past the arm spool. 1. ARM IN, LIGHT-LOAD OPERATING PILOT 2. Since the passage to the tank is restricted by the CIRCUIT arm variable recirculation spool, the oil returning from the arm cylinder (R) arrives at the load check Purpose: valve CAr. Speed-up and Anticavitation when the arm is at light 3. Since the (R) side pressure of the cylinder is higher loaded. than the (H) side pressure of it when working load is light, the pressure pushes the load check valve Principle: open and is recirculated to the (H) side so as to speed up the light-load digging operation. The oil returning from the arm cylinder rod (R) is recirculated variably to the head (H) at inside of Cavitation prevention control in arm in control valve. operation Operation: If the engine speed and the arm in pilot pressure are processed in the controller, the controller puts out a 1. If the arm digging operation is performed, the current command to the arm variable solenoid secondary pilot proportional pressure gets out of proportional valve, and brings the arm to its forced port 4 of the left pilot valve (10) and acts upon the variable recirculation position to prevent cavitation low pressure sensor (SE-7). from occurring. At the same time, the pressure is branched off to two flows, acts upon the PAa port and the PLc2 port, changes over the arm spool and the arm lock valve Arm variable recirculation valve (26) selector and release closed poppet CRa. From arm spool 2. The voltage output by the low pressure sensor is input into mechatro controller, and is pilot signal- To tank From processed by the mechatro controller, and is output arm to P2 pump proportional valve (PSV-P2) and arm To recirculation tank proportional variable recirculation proportional valve (PSV-A). valve 3. The P2 pump proportional valve (PSV-P2) operates the P2 pump in proportion to the pilot operating pressure, but in case of the arm variable To CAr check Recirculation cut Normal recirculation Forced recirculation recirculation proportional valve, since the second- valve R0299 ary pressure of solenoid proportional valve is pilot- signal- processed in the mechatro controller in inversely proportion to the pilot operating pressure, the secondary pressure of solenoid proportional valve with pilot operating pressure for arm light digging becomes smaller and is switched into the regular recirculation section.

E265 4 23 22 1 21 4 PSV-E PSV-F 9 3 2 19 18 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 ATT. BOOSTING 7 P2 NEUTRAL CUT 6 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 NEUTRAL CUT 28 27 29 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION ARM CIRCUIT (E265): Arm in operation (heavy load) sequence confluence function TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3069 T2-3-21 Copyright © New Holland

4 T2-3-22 23 22 21 1 3 PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 17 15 13 31 10 25 20 SOL/V BLOCK 14 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT SAFETY LOCK LEVER 8 7 ATT BOOST PRESSURE 6 P2 BY-PASS CUT 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT 26 P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 29 ARM CIRCUIT (E305): Arm in operation (heavy load) sequence confluence function ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3070 E305 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-3-23 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT This section describes the following operations: 4. ARM IN, HEAVY LOAD OPERATING 3. Arm in, heavy load operating pilot circuit SEQUENCE CONFLUXED MAIN (recirculation cut). CIRCUIT 4. Arm in, heavy load operating sequence confluxed Purpose: main circuit. Speed up for arm in operation Principle: 3. ARM IN, HEAVY LOAD OPERATING P1 pump flow is confluxed with P2 pump flow in PILOT CIRCUIT (RECIRCULATION CUT) control valve (2). Mechatronics: Operation: 1. In the arm digging operation, if the heavy load is 1. P2 pump delivery oil flows in the travel left section applied to the arm, the current of arm variable through P2 port of control valve (2) and separated recirculation solenoid proportional valve is mini- into by-pass circuit and parallel circuit. Conse- mized and the arm variable recirculation is cut. quently the arm spool is switched and pushes and opens load check valve LCa through parallel cir- 2. The travel straight solenoid proportional valve cuit, and flows in the arm spool. (PSV-C) and P1 by-pass cut solenoid proportional valve (PSV-D) are energized at the same time 2. On the other hand, P1 pump delivery oil flows into when the command current of arm variable P1 port of control valve (2), and the travel straight recirculation solenoid proportional valve (PSV-A) section, and opens load check valve CT2, then the is minimized, the secondary pressure of respective delivery oil confluxes with the oil delivered from solenoid proportional valve is delivered and the load check valve CP2 on P2 parallel circuit, and pressure acts on PTb and PCb ports of control flows in the arm spool. valve (2), switches the travel straight valve (24) and 3. Next, oil is supplied to the arm cylinder (H) side via P1 by-pass cut valve (28), enabling the circuit for the arm spool and the Aa port of control valve (2). arm sequence to be confluxed. 4. Meantime, the oil returning from the arm cylinder 3. With the arm digging operation, the function of pilot (R) side enters the Ba port and reaches the arm valve is the same as that in light loading. lock valve CRa. If the arm lock selector is shifted, the oil enters the arm spool as the arm lock valve CRa is open. 5. The oil returns from the arm spool to the tank line through the arm variable recirculation valve (26).

4 3 T2-3-24 23 22 1 21 TRAVEL MOTORS SWING MOTOR PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 24 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 ARM CIRCUIT: Arm out operation, confluence function 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 SV-4 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 SV-2 ATT. BOOSTING 7 PSV-B 6 P2 BY-PASS CUT 20 PSV-C 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P1 BY-PASS CUT P2 BY-PASS CUT PSV-D P1 BY-PASS CUT 28 27 29 26 PSV-A ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION SV-3 TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SV-1 SWING P/B 30 R3071 E265-E305 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland E265-E305 T2-3-25 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT This section describes the following operations: Operation: 5. Arm out pilot circuit. 1. The delivery oil of P1 pump confluxes with the oil in the arm cylinder (R) side through the arm conflux 6. Arm out 2 pumps conflux main circuit. valve (27) and load check valve CCa. 7. Natural fall protection with arm lock valve. 2. Then, the oil passes through arm spool opens arm lock valve CRa with free flow and flows into arm cylinder (R) side through control valve (2) Ba port. 5. ARM OUT PILOT CIRCUIT 3. And, the return oil from arm cylinder (H) side flows into Aa port, passes through arm spool, and returns Mechatronics: into tank circuit. 1. If the arm out operation is performed, the second- ary pilot proportional pressure gets out of port 2 of the left pilot valve (10), and acts upon the low 7. NATURAL FALL PROTECTION WITH pressure sensor (SE-8). At the same time, the oil is branched off into three flows and acts upon the PA1, ARM LOCK VALVE PBa ports of C/V (2). Purpose: 2. The operating proportional secondary pressure en- tered in PBa port of control valve (2) switches the To prevent the arm from falling naturally by the arm spool. weight of the arm & bucket. 3. Then, the operating secondary pressure entered in Principle: PA1 port of control valve (2) switches the arm conflux valve (27). Complete seat of the return circuit against the arm spool of the arm cylinder (R) side circuit. 4. The voltage output by low pressure sensor (SE-8) is input to the mechatro controller and is processed in Operation: signal, and the mechatro controller outputs com- mand current to by-pass cut solenoid proportional 1. If the secondary pressure for arm operation disap- valve (PSV-D). This solenoid valve delivers the pears and the arm cylinder stops, the pressure on secondary pressure, and the secondary pressure the rod (R) side passes through the selector of the acts on PCb port of control valve (2) and switches lock valve from the Ba port of control valve (2), acts P1 by-pass cut valve (28). the back pressure on the lock valve CRa and seats the lock valve. 2. Since the oil flow into the arm spool from the lock 6. ARM OUT 2 PUMPS CONFLUX MAIN valve is shut off completely, natural fall of the arm CIRCUIT due to oil leaks through the arm spool is prevented. Purpose: Arm out operation speed up. Principle: The oil delivered by the P1 pump is confluxed with that delivered by the P2 pump in C/V (2).

4 T2-3-26 function 23 22 1 21 4 PSV-E PSV-F 9 3 2 19 18 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 ATT. BOOSTING 7 P2 NEUTRAL CUT 6 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 NEUTRAL CUT 28 27 29 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3072 COMBINED OPERATION (E265): Boom up/Travel forward 1st speed operation, travel straight E265 Copyright © New Holland

4 E305 23 22 function 21 1 3 PSV-E PSV-F 9 2 19 18 12 17 15 13 31 10 25 20 SOL/V BLOCK 14 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT SAFETY LOCK LEVER 8 7 ATT BOOST PRESSURE 6 P2 BY-PASS CUT 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 BY-PASS CUT 27 28 26 29 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3073 COMBINED OPERATION (E305): Boom up/Travel forward 1st speed operation, travel straight T2-3-27 Copyright © New Holland

Copyright © New Holland T2-3-28 E265-E305 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT COMBINED OPERATION This section describes only the difference in com- 2. BOOM UP/TRAVEL, MAIN CIRCUIT bined operation: 1. Boom up/travel, pilot circuit. Purpose: 2. Boom up/travel, main circuit. To insure straight travel movement during travel operation even if the attachment is operated. Principle: 1. BOOM UP/TRAVEL, PILOT CIRCUIT The travel action and the attachment action are actuated by separate pumps. Mechatronics: <Pilot circuit other than independent operation> Operation: 1. If the mechatro controller processes low pressure 1. The oil delivered by the P1 and P2 pumps runs into sensors signals, a current command is put out to the travel straight section from the P1 and P2 ports two valves; the travel straight solenoid proportional of control valve (2). Since the travel straight spool valve (PSV-C) and the P2 bypass cut solenoid is shifted, the oil delivered by the P2 pump is proportional valve (PSV-B). These valves put out branched off to the P1 and P2 bypass lines. secondary pressure which acts upon the PTb and In the meantime, the oil delivered by the P1 pump the PCa ports of control valve (2). flows through travel straight valve and flows into 2. The pilot pressure of solenoid proportional valve load check valve CT1 and CT2 and flow to the P1 (PSV-C) enters to the PTb port of control valve (2) and P2 parallel circuits. and changes over the travel straight valve (24). 2. Next, since the travel right and left actions are Meanwhile, the secondary pressure of solenoid operated by the P2 pump delivery oil. Meantime, proportional valve (PSV-B) which enters the PCa since the boom spool and other spools operate on port of control valve (2) changes over the P2 bypass the parallel circuits, the oil delivered by the P1 cut valve (29). pump is used. 3. However, a portion of the flow is led to the travel straight spool notch restriction. The speed of actuators like boom, travel, etc. is adjusted by the circuit of restriction.

E265 4 23 22 1 21 4 PSV-E PSV-F 9 3 2 19 18 12 17 TRAVEL STRAIGHT 31 15 13 20 10 25 SOL/V BLOCK 14 20 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT LEVER LOCK 8 ATT. BOOSTING 7 P2 NEUTRAL CUT 6 20 P1 BY-PASS CUT 5 11 TRAVEL STRAIGHT P2 BY-PASS CUT P1 NEUTRAL CUT 28 27 COMBINED OPERATION (E265): Swing/Arm in operation, Swing priority function 26 ARM VARIABLE RECIRCULATION 29 TRAVEL 1/2 SPEED CHANGEOVER SWING P/B 30 R3074 T2-3-29 Copyright © New Holland

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Lasers in Dentistry—Current Concepts

Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, a 1970 graduate of the University of Southern California School of Dentistry, is an Clinical Professor in the Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences at the University of California  San Francisco School of Dentistry. He ran his own private practice of general dentistry in Redwood City, CA; and retired from it after 35 years. He is a life member of both the California Dental Association and the American Dental Association.  He has served as a past president of the Academy of Laser Dentistry, received its Leon Goldman Award for Clinical Excellence, and is a past editor-in-chief of the Journal of Laser Dentistry. He has used dental lasers since early 1991 and holds Advanced Proficiency in Nd:YAG and Er:YAG wavelengths. He is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists, a University of California certified Dental Laser Educator, and is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, the national dental honor society. He serves as a reviewer for several journals, and is a founding associate of Laser Education International. He recently received the outstanding faculty member award from the American College of Dentists. Dr. Coluzzi has presented about lasers worldwide, co-authored two textbooks, and published several peer-reviewed articles and book chapters.

Dr. Steven Parker studied dentistry at University College Hospital Medical School, University of London, UK and graduated in 1974. Dr. Parker has been involved in the use of lasers in clinical dentistry since 1990. He is closely involved in the provision of education in laser use in dentistry. He served as President of the Academy of Laser Dentistry in 2005-6. In addition, Dr. Parker holds Advanced Proficiency status in multiple laser wavelengths. He was awarded Mastership of the Academy of Laser Dentistry in 2008. Awards gained with the Academy of Laser Dentistry have been the Leon Goldman award for excellence in clinical laser dentistry (1998) and the Distinguished Service Award (2010). From 2010, he has served an appointment as Professore a contratto in the Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Italy. He also acts as International Coordinator and lead faculty of the Master of Science (Master Livello II) degree programme in laser dentistry at the University of Genoa. Dr Parker has contributed chapters on aspects of laser use in dentistry in several text books and multi-media platforms. Additionally, he has received publication of over 40 peer-reviewed papers on the use of lasers in dentistry, including a series “The Use of Lasers in Dentistry” published in the British Dental Journal in 2007 and later as a textbook. He was the dental consultant to the UK Medical Health Regulatory Agency (Dept. of Health) in the 2008 (Revised 2015) publication "Guidance on the safe use of lasers, intense light source systems and LEDs in medical surgical dental and aesthetic practices”. He serves as associate-editor of the Journal of Lasers in Medical Science. In addition, he serves as referee for many peer-reviewed dental journals worldwide. He maintains a Private Practice in Harrogate, UK.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
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Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Lasers in Dentistry—Current Concepts

Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, a 1970 graduate of the University of Southern California School of Dentistry, is an Clinical Professor in the Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences at the University of California  San Francisco School of Dentistry. He ran his own private practice of general dentistry in Redwood City, CA; and retired from it after 35 years. He is a life member of both the California Dental Association and the American Dental Association.  He has served as a past president of the Academy of Laser Dentistry, received its Leon Goldman Award for Clinical Excellence, and is a past editor-in-chief of the Journal of Laser Dentistry. He has used dental lasers since early 1991 and holds Advanced Proficiency in Nd:YAG and Er:YAG wavelengths. He is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists, a University of California certified Dental Laser Educator, and is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, the national dental honor society. He serves as a reviewer for several journals, and is a founding associate of Laser Education International. He recently received the outstanding faculty member award from the American College of Dentists. Dr. Coluzzi has presented about lasers worldwide, co-authored two textbooks, and published several peer-reviewed articles and book chapters.

Dr. Steven Parker studied dentistry at University College Hospital Medical School, University of London, UK and graduated in 1974. Dr. Parker has been involved in the use of lasers in clinical dentistry since 1990. He is closely involved in the provision of education in laser use in dentistry. He served as President of the Academy of Laser Dentistry in 2005-6. In addition, Dr. Parker holds Advanced Proficiency status in multiple laser wavelengths. He was awarded Mastership of the Academy of Laser Dentistry in 2008. Awards gained with the Academy of Laser Dentistry have been the Leon Goldman award for excellence in clinical laser dentistry (1998) and the Distinguished Service Award (2010). From 2010, he has served an appointment as Professore a contratto in the Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Italy. He also acts as International Coordinator and lead faculty of the Master of Science (Master Livello II) degree programme in laser dentistry at the University of Genoa. Dr Parker has contributed chapters on aspects of laser use in dentistry in several text books and multi-media platforms. Additionally, he has received publication of over 40 peer-reviewed papers on the use of lasers in dentistry, including a series “The Use of Lasers in Dentistry” published in the British Dental Journal in 2007 and later as a textbook. He was the dental consultant to the UK Medical Health Regulatory Agency (Dept. of Health) in the 2008 (Revised 2015) publication "Guidance on the safe use of lasers, intense light source systems and LEDs in medical surgical dental and aesthetic practices”. He serves as associate-editor of the Journal of Lasers in Medical Science. In addition, he serves as referee for many peer-reviewed dental journals worldwide. He maintains a Private Practice in Harrogate, UK.

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Electronics Repair Manual

Transcript

Electronics Repair Manual • Electronics Repair Basics • Tools and Test Equipment • Troubleshooting and Maintenance • Specific Repair Instructions • Schematic Diagrams • Component/Manufacturer Indices Editor Gene B. Williams © WEKA Publishing, Inc., 1993 New York • Munich • Zurich • Paris Milan • Amsterdam • Vienna The publisher shall not be liable to the purchaser or any other person or entity with respect to any liability, loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by this book. When attributed as a source, the named manufacturer reserves all rights to the information presented. WEKA Publishing reserves the rights to the format in which such information is presented in the Electronics Repair Manual. For the sum of the other material in the book, all rights reserved by VVEKA Publishing. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means-graphic, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping or information storage and retrieval systems-without the permission of the publisher. WEKA Publishing 97 Indian Field Rd Greenwich, CT 06830 (203) 622-4177 FAX (203) 622-4187 A member of the international WEKA Publishing Group New York· Munich· Zurich· Paris· Milan· Amsterdam· Vienna ©WEKA Publishing, Inc., 1993 ISBN: 0-929321-06-5 WEKA Publishing, Inc 97 Indian Field Road Greenwich, CT 06830 Phone: 203-622-4177 Toll-free: 1-800-222-WEKA ~ Fax: 203-622-4187 L..- ...I USA • Gennany • Switzerland • France • Italy • Netherlands • Austria • Belgium Dear Subscriber, As Product Manager for the Electronics Repair Manual, I'd like to welcome you personally to what I think is the most useful reference source for electronics repair. Your manual occupies a unique place in today's array of electronics books andmagazines; unique simply because it covers and explores all of the areas which are of interest to professionals and hobbyists. From repairing audio and video equipment, to computers, to household appliances and automobile electronics, this manual is packed with valuable information, references, and step-by-step instructions-things you want and need to kll1ow. Repair All Kinds of Electronics Yourself Radio receivers, television sets, VCRs, camcorders, personal computers and peripherals, CD players - whatever your repair job, you'll have comprehensive information within easy reach. For each device covered you'll find: • fundamentals of operation • necessary tools and test equipment • preventive maintenance • troubleshooting and repair instructions Use Universal Repair Instructions for General Troubleshooting Universal repair instructions are provided that apply to entire groups of equipment. You'll find general approaches on how to locate the faulty parts of your device and how to repair it. You can be working on one of the hundreds of VCR models in use today and have valid repair instructions at your fingertips. Profit from Model-Specific Repair Instructions Specific repair instructions show you step-by-step troubleshooting and repair for partilcular models. This in-depth information is illustrated with drawings and pictures, accompanied by checklists and diagrams. As a beginner or professional, this section offers you a tr~asure of tips and hints that will increase your success with repairing all kinds of electronics equipment. Now You Have a Complete Reference Source at Your Fingertips In addition to universal repair instructions and model-specific repair instructions, your manual provides you with schematics, valuable data tables on electronic components, an in-depth section on tools and test equipment, and lists of suppliers and manufacturers. Your Manual Continues to Grow in Size and Value Your quarterly updates to the Electronics Repair Manual provide you with an everexpanding source of repair information. You'll keep up with technological developments and increase your productivity through additional hands-on projects. Shape Your Supplements Use the enclosed questionnaire to help us select the devices and topics for future updates. What devices are you interested in? Do you like more universal or more model-specific repair instructions? What kind of component indices would be of help to you? In a sense, you become a member of our editorial team. You help us to make the manual your manual- to make it what you want it to be. I hope you'll enjoy your edition of the Electronics Repair Manual! Any comments and suggestions you may have regarding this book and the updates are welcomed. We look forward to hearing from you. Sinc:erely, ~!J.U Christopher B. Smith Product Manager for Electronics Publications P.S.: If you like to save time and money, please feel free to give our Customer Service Department a call in order to take advantage of our special subscription offer. You'll be saving shipping and handling for a whole year and you'll receive an additional binder for free! So why don't call today! Our toll-free number is 1·800·622·WEKA. Electronics Repair Manual· Questionnaire 1 How Interesting are the different sections of the manual to you? (please indicate: 1 = highest interest; 5 = lowest interest) Name: Address: 1 Electronics Repair Basics Tools and Test Equipment Video Television Audio Automobile Electronics Computer EqUipment Home Appliances Reference Materials: -Addresses -Indices - Schematics 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 City: Phone Number: ( • State:___ZIP:_ _ ) 2 How Important Is our toll-free hotllne service to you? (1 =very important; 5 =not imponant) 2 0 1 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 3 Which devices would you like to see covered In future updates? Please indicate whether you are interested in: a) maintenance; b) general trOUbleshooting techniques and repair inlitructions; c) troubleshooting certain problems (please indicate the problem) d) case studies to various models [(please indicate the manufacturer and model(s)]; e) schematic diagrams [(please indicate manufacturer and model(s)]. Please note the most important manufacturers for each area. 5 Please mention any other topics that Interest you: 6 Which kind of indices would you like to receive? [Please mention for each index, whether it should be a part number index (p), a functional index (f), or alternate source index (a)] o Thyristors and Triacs o Transistors o Linear ICs such as 0 Diodes 0 Microcontrcillers o Microprocessors o Memories o Other Digital ICs 7 I use th,e "Electronics Repair Manual" for Hobbyonly 8 As a repair technician, do you consider yourself: o 9 o Hobby and business o Business only o Beginner o Advanced o Professional Do you use a computer? 0 No 0 IBM Comp~ltible 0 Disk Drive: o Yes o Macintosh 051/.1" 10 .Which other areas would you like to receive more detailed Information about? o o Other 3Y2" o Integrated Circuits o Data Acquisition 0 Electronics Projects o Electronics Basics o Home Office Computing o Other o Radio Electronics 0 PopUlar Electronics 0 McGraw Hill Electronics Book Club 11 Which magazines do you read? Section 11 Miscellaneous Devices 11/A An Introduction Copier An Introduction Troubleshooting and Repair Fax Machine An Introduction Maintenance Telephone An Introduction Test Equipment Troubleshooting and Repair 11/C 11/C - A 11/C - TR 11/F 11/F - A 11/F - M 11/Tel 11/Tel- A 11/Tel- TE 11/Tel- TR section 12 Reference Materials 121A 12/1 12/5 Addresses Indices Schematics (Note: For more detailed information see "Table of Contents" at the beginning of each section.) Page 4 Section 2 • Preface Table of Contents Section 2 Preface Table of Contents 2/1 Welcome How to Use Your Manual Safety Procedures 2/2 2/3 Page 1 Section 2 • Preface I I Coptents I Ta~le of Page 2 Section 2 • Preface 2/1 Welcome 2/1 Welcome Welcome to the Electronics Repair Manual! This unique publication aims to provide the starter, as well as the professional, with clear and concise information on how to repair and maintain a wide range of electronic equipment. Electronic equipment is complex, becoming more complex almost by the day. Our main objective is to ensure that the Electronics Repair Manual contains comprehensive, instructive and up-to-date material. To help us meet this goal, regular supplements to the book willprovide you with additional troubleshooting and repair instructions, and technological updates. In many cases, electronic equipment is delicate. Touch the wrong point with a probe, or use an improper cleaning material, and what was a simple job turns into a much more extensive one. One home technician was trying to lubricate the tracking bars of a CD player with a spray can ofWD-40. His intention was to cure the skipping that was occurring. Instead he ended up destroying the main circuit board and the laser's lens. The Electronics Repair Manual will help you avoid mistakes, and give you plenty of repair tips and helpful advice. Safety is the most important consideration when you are working with electronics. Always take precautions for your personal safety and the safety of the equipment on which you are working. Your manual includes a detailed safety article which outlines the steps you should take to avoid injury. The article also describes the measures to take in the event of an injury. It is imperative that you only tackle those faults which you understand. Putting this another way, you should only attempt to repair an item of electronic equipment if you are fully confident that you understand what you arle doing. Your Electronics Repair Manual will give you the information and confidence to tackle even complex problems. However, you should proceed cautiously at all times. WEKA Publishing is not responsible for any damage to health or equipment. Page 1 Section 2 • Preface 2/1 I Welcome Many ofyou will wish to specialize in particular areas ofelectronic maintenance. Others will wish to obtain a broader understanding of how to service electronic equipment. The Electronics Repair Manual is designed to satisfy both needs, providing introductory and advanced information on a variety of equipment. We welcome responses from our readers. Your comments and suggestions help us to determine the contents of your future supplements. In a sense, you become a member of our editorial team. You help us to make the manual your manual - to make it what you want it to be. Please use the attached questionnaire to let us know your interests. Tell us which devices, general references, indices, and technologies you would like to see covered in the future. Whether you are a professional technician or an enthusiast working at home, we hope that you enjoy using the Electronics Repair Manual and wish you great success in all of your efforts! Sincerely, Gene Williams Editor, Electronics Repair Manual Page 2 Section 2 • Preface 2/2 How to Use Your Manual 2/2 How to Use Your Manual The Electronics Repair Manual contains 12 sections. Each section is further divided into chapters. Sections 1 to 4 cover general information: Table of Contents, lPreface, Electronic Repair Basics, and Tools and Test Equipment. The chapters in these sections are divided numerically, as you can see in the Table of Contents in Section 1. Sections 5 to 11 contain repair information on specific types of electronic equipment, ranging from radio receivers and CD players to personal computers. The chapters in these sections are divided alphabetically. For example, in "Section 5: Video" you can locate information on camcorders by looking for articles with "5/Cam" as a heading. When you need VCR information, look for "5NCR". This structure will help you keep your manual organized as it grows in the future, allowing you to quickly locate needed information. Below are headings for different sections, showing how the sections are subdivided by numbers and/or alphabetically. Section 3 • Electronics Repair Basics 3/2 Electronics Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - PC 3/2 - C - PC - R Components Passive Components Riesistors Section 5 • Video Steam Camcorders S/Cam - TR S/Cam - TR - PS Troubleshooting and Repair Power Supplies Page 1 Section 2 • Preface /2 HoWl to Use Yourl Manual If you were interested in finding some basic information on resistors, the first place you would look would be "Section 3: Electronic Repair Basics". Once in Section 3, you would locate "Chapter 2: Electronic Fundamentals". In example 1, you will see "3/2 Electronic Fundamentals" in the black box. Once you are in Chapter 2, you would look under the subhead "Components", which is again divided into"Active Components" and "Passive Components". Since resistors are passive components, you would look into this subheading. As you can see in example 1, the subhead abbreviation for "Components" is C. The abbreviation for "Passive Components" is PC. Under the passive compo~ nents subheading you will find the resistors article abbreviated s "R". That is how the article got its chapter number "3/2-C-PC-R". The second example shows you how to locate information on troubleshooting camcorder power supplies. 1) You would look for camcorders in "Section 5: Video" under "5/Cam". 2) All troubleshooting and repair information is abbreviated with "TR". 3) A logical abbreviation for power supplies is "PS". The article you are looking for is labeled "S/Cam-TR-PS". The following short list will show you some abbreviations that are used for each section: A: An Introduction F: Features M: Maintenance TE: Test Equipment TR: Troubleshooting and Repair VCS: Various Case Studies All other abbreviations reflect the starting letters of the devices, parts, and components for which you are looking. Section Twelve contains Reference Materials. This section is subdivided into "12/A" for Addresses, "12/1" for Indices, and "12/S" for Schematics. We developed this alphabetical structure for your manual to allow you to easily insertfuture articles into the book, without messing up a numerical structure. As your manual grows, you will always have a reference that's well organized, upto-date and easy to use. Page 2 Section 2 •. Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures 2/3 Safety Procedures Nothing is more importantthan safety. Trying to save a few dollars in repair costs isn't worth risking electrocution. Safety can be divided into two overall parts-your personal safety and equipment safety. Even an expensive computer system can be replaced. Your health, or your life, cannot. The most basic rule of safety is that if you think safety is for the other guy, let the job be, too. Keep in mind that it isn't just your own safety that is of concern. You are responsible for the safety ofeveryone around you as well. Even ifyou re:cognize that a certain spot inside the TV set you're working on is dangerous, someone else may not. You might understand that the soldering iron is on and hot--a small child coming into your work area might think that it looks like a fun toy. Once you and those around you are safe, be sure that the equipment is safe. Once a technician who was probing a powersupply during an initial diagnosis, touched the probe in a way that caused a short circuit, and blew out the power supply. Warnings • When replacing afuse, use one thatis an exactmatch. Ifthe value is too small, the fuse is likely to blow; if the value is too high, the fuse can't provide protection. NEVER use a wire or other conductor to replace a fuse-not even tempo rari/y. When possible, test and diagnose withthe power offand the unit unplugged. Don't assume an unplugged unit is safe. Some components, particularly capacitors, can hold lethal charges for long periods of time. When power has. to be applied, proceed with extreme caution. Whenever possible, use the "One Hand Rule" (keep one hand in your pocket). Use insulated tools, and hold them ONLY by the insulation. • • • • • Page 1 Section 2 • Preface Pro4edures S~fety I /3 • • • • Wear insulated shoes. Work on nonconductive sUlface, NEVER on a metal table. Be sure the work area is sufficiently lighted. The work area in general should be clean and well organized. a • Remember that heat may also be a danger. Some components get very hot during operation. • Some tools, such as soldering irons, are meant to be hot. If the tip is hot enough to melt solder, it is hot enough to cause serious burns, damage to components and sUlfaces, and ijyou're careless the tip can melt through wires, including the tool's power cord. Always use the right toolfor the job. For example, the tip ofthe screwdriver or wrench has to fit correctly. When clipping wires, use a wire cutter (and of the right size) not scissors. When replacing components, use an exact replacement. Remember: WHEN IN DOUBT, DON'T DO IT! • • • Electric:al Shock Usually there is very little danger from the DC voltage in most equipment. It is generally of low value, in voltage and current. The greatest danger in these areas is to the equipment itself. However, do not throw caution to the wind. Always assume the voltage and current are lethal, and you won't get into trouble. Unless the device is powered by batteries, there is a power supply. This converts AC into DC. The danger to you begins at the wall outlet and could continue well past the power supply. (A television set, for example, takes a very high voltage from the power supply to drive the picture tube.) The AC in the standard wall outlet is 117 VAC (nominal) and is normally protected by a 15 A or 20 A breaker or fuse. The purpose of the breaker or fuse is to reduce the danger of fire. DO NOT count on them to protect you or the equipment. At 117 VAC, it takes just a fraction of an amp to cause your muscles to become Page 2 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures paralyzed. If this happens you won't be able to let go ofwhat is causing the shock. With just a fraction of an amp more, your heart can become paralyzed. That fuse or breaker allows 15 or more amps to flow almost indefinitely. This is hundreds of times what it takes to kill a person. Worse, since these !breakers are designed to allow the heavier current draw for times when motors start, for a second or so the amperage flowing can be much higher. The lesson, again, is that you should not be thinking of that breaker or fuse as a device that will protect you. It won't! As stated above, when working around dangerous voltages and currents, you need to be insulated from the surroundings. It is not overly cautious to work on an insulated surface, while wearing insulated shoes on an insulated floor. Even then, keep one hand in your pocket (the "One Hand Rule") to avoid accidentally having yourself become part of the AC circuit. Merely keeping that other hand back isn't enough. You might be tempted to reach forward with it. Placing it in your pocket will force you to think 'about whatyou are doing. Fire Hopefully you will never have to deal with this problem. If you are careful, you never will. However, you need to be prepared, just in case. The first step is to be sure that there is a safe and quick exit from the work area. This is yet another reason to keep the working area clean and uncluttered. If you have to get out of the area fast, climbing over boxes or taking the chance of tripping on electrical cords increases the danger. Why would you suddenly have to flee? There are two main reasons. One is that you may not be able to get the fire under control. The other is that some electrical fires can release poisonous gases in the air. Even if the fire is out, it may not be safe for you to remain. At least one fire extinguisher should be immediately at hand, and easily accessible. This must be of the right type. For electrical fires you'll need the dry powder type (Type C). Liquids, and water in particular, only make matters worse. Having a fIre extinguisher around won't do much good if you don't know how to use it. The unit should also be serviced on a regular basis (some suggest once per year as a minimum). Don't rely on the gauge. Even ifit shows "good" on the dial, the unit may not be functioning. Page 3 Section 2 • Preface S~fety i /3 Proqedures The working area should be protected with aproper alarm system. The fire alarm, like the fire extinguisher, should be tested regularly. Experts suggest that once per month is not too frequent. First Aid It is a good idea to have a quality first aid manual. You should know the basicsand know them well enough to apply them calmly under an emergency situation. You might even consider taking classes. Many hospitals and medical clinics offer free classes in CPR. The working area should contain a complete first aid kit. As supplies are used from it, they should be replaced. Make sure that the kit is always fully stocked, and with fresh materials. The Shock Victim In the event of an electrical shock the first thing to do is to disconnect the power supply, or remove the person from the supply. Do this ONLY if it can be done safely and without risk of shock to yourself. This may mean standing on insulating material (if available) and pushing the live conductor with an insulator, such as a broom handle. If the person is not breathing, and the heart is not beating, it is essential to act as quickly as possible. The ABC of first aid in these circumstances is: Figure 1: Turn the person onto their back and tilt the head. Page 4 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Airway Open the airway by rolling the person on his or her back, gently lifting the chin forward with one hand while pressing the forehead back with the other. This has the effect of lifting the tongue forward so that it does not block the airway. (See Figure 1). Pinch the victim's nose with your fingers and close it. Take a deep bre~ath, and blow into the victim's mouth. Watch the chestto see ifitrises (Figure 2). Remove your mouth and see ifthe chest sinks. If the chestdoes not go up and down, adjust the position ofthe head andjaw to clearthe airway (Figure 3). Repeat the process. Now check for a pulse as an indicator that the heart is beating (Figure 4). If it is not, go immediately to "Circulation". Breathing Figure 2: Pinch the nose, create a seal between your mouth and theirs, and bllow while watching to see if their chest rises. If the heart is beating, continue mouth-to-mouth resuscitation at a rate of about 14 times per minute until natural breathing begins again. When natural breathing has started, put the victim in the recovery position. That is, move the person so that the front of the body is to the ground and the head is resting with the right side to the ground and the chin tilted to keep thc~ airway clear (Figure 5). The right arm should be down and beside the body, with the left arm forward. The left knee should be bent. Circulation The mostreliable way for an amateur to check the pulse ofan unconscious person is as follows: PageS Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Figure 3: If the chest does not rise and fall, tilt the chin again. Figure 4: Check the pulse for sign of heartbeat. Place two fingertips on the voice box (Adam's apple) and slide them around the neck to either side. A pulse should be felt in either of the two carotid arteries that run up the sides of the neck (Figure 4). The victim must be on his or her back and on a firm surface. Kneel beside the victim and find thepoint where the ribs join atthe bottom ofthe breastbone. Place the heel of one hand on the breastbone about two finger-widths above this point. (Figure 6.) Put your other hand on top of the first and get into position over the victim with your arms straight and your shoulders directly above the breastbone. Keeping your arms straight, press down on the breastbone about 2 inches. Relax the pressure and repeat the process at a rate of just over one per second. Don't Page 6 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Figure 5: With breathing restored, move the person into the recovery position. bang on the chest. Try to simulate the smooth, steady action of normal beating. Complete 15 of these actions and then go back to the head, open the airway and give two cycles of mouth~to-mouthresuscitation. Continue with 15 chest compressions followed by two mouth-to-mouth cycles, checking for a pulse after the first minute and then repeating the entire cycle again, with a pulse check every three minutes. Stop the chest compressions as soon as a pulse is detected. Continue mouth-tomouth until natural breathing starts. If necessary, assist with the natural breathing to help the victim return to his or her natural rate. Figure 6: Pushing on the spot shown causes pressure on the heart. Page 7 Section 2 • Preface 2/3 Safety Procedures Figure 7: The CPR position. Even with a transformer, where there is an apparent increase in power, the increase in the voltage level is accompanied by a decrease in the amperage. In an ideal (theoretical) transformer, the two balance and there is no net gain in power. (In reality there is a net loss.) Active components can do a variety of things to the current. They can amplify it, modify it in a number of ways and basically make it behave in a desired manner. Vacuum tubes are active components. However, they have been almost entirely replaced by semi-conductors (diodes, transistors, etc.). Semi-conductors are smaller, lighter, or require less energy to operate and are tougher and more capable. You may encounter tubes in old equipment or in equipment that handles large amounts of power (such as large transmitters). Even here tubes are disappearing, since semi-conductors can handle more power. Page 1 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - A Components Active Components An Introduction Page 2 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes 3/2 - C - AC Active Components 3/2 - C - AC-O Diodes Diodes generally comprise a semiconductor P-N junction of either silicon (Si) or germanium (Ge). In order to obtain conduction, the P-type material must be made positive with respect to the N-type material. (The N-type connection is the cathode.) The direction of current flow is from anode to cathode when the diode is conducting (as shown in Figure 1). Very little current flows in the reverse direction. (The amount of reverse current is negligible in most silicon devices.) + A~~C Current flow _ .. Cathod e + Anode P N Figure 1: Forward biased (conducting) diode Diodes exhibit a low resistance to current flow in one direction and a high resistance in the other. The direction in which current flows is referred to as the forward direction, while negative current is called the reverse direction.When a diode is conducting, it is said to be forward biased, and a small voltage (ideally zero) is dropped across it. This voltage is known as the foward voltage drop. The maximum reverse voltage that a diode can tolerate is usually specified in terms of its reverse repetitive maximum voltage, or peak: inverse voltage (PIV). Page 1 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - c 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes -----~~---+ No current flow + Anode Cathode Depletion region.J Figure 2: Reverse biased (non-conducting) diode Typical values of forward current and forward voltage for commonly available silicon and germanium diodes are given below: Table 1 Value of Forward Current and Forward Voltage Drop Forward Current Silicon (1N4148) Forward Voltage Drop Silicon (1N5401) Germanium (OA91) 10llA 100llA 1mA 10mA 100mA 1A - O.43V O.58V O.65V O.75V - O.55V O.60V O.65V O.72V O.85V - O.12V O.26V O.32V O.43V Germanium diodes conduct at lower forward voltages than their silicon counterparts (typically 100 mV as compared with 600 mY) but they tend to exhibIt considerably more reverse leakage current (1 pA as compared with 10 nA for an applied voltage of 50 V). The forward resistance of a conducting silicon diode is also generally much lower than that of a comparable germanium type. Thus germanium diodes are used primarily for signal detection purposes whereas silicon devices are used for rectification and for general purpose applications. Typical forward and reverse characteristics for comparable germanium and silicon diodes are shown in Figure 3. Diodes are often divided into signal and rectifier types according to their principal field of application. Signal diodes require consistent forward characteristics with low forward voltage drop. Rectifier diodes need to be able to cope with high values of reverse voltage and large values of forward current. Page 2 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 ,- C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D =-=...:..:..::r:.=..:..:..::::.::.= Components Active Components Diodes Forward current. IF Silicon (Si) 12 10 8 (mAl 6 4 Reverse voltage. (VRI 2 -100 (V) -75 -50 ~=====:!:=~d=..L....J.."7r_=,......,......:::::r_"'I__l Forward voltage. VF -6 (uA) Reverse current.lR Figure 3: Typical characteristics for comparable silicon and germanium diodes Consistency of characteristics is of secondary importance in such applications. Rectifier diodes are often available in the form of a bridge (see Figure 4) which proves full-wave rectification. »--0+ Figure 4: Bridge rectifier Page 3 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active· Components Diodes Commonly Used Abbreviations A IF c IR K Plot T TG Tj Rth = anode = cathode forward current = reverse current = cathode (in some sources) = total power loss = thermal resistance = temperature = casing temperature = junction layer temperature Tu TK ambient temperature temp. coefficient of the zener voltage t time V voltage VBR breakdown voltage VF forward voltage VR reverse voltage Vz = zener voltage PIV = peak inverse voltage VRRM = max. repetitive reverse voltage = = = = = = = Diode Coding Diode coding can be confusing. At times, several conventions are used simultaneously. For example, a diode coded AAl19 is actually a European labeling scheme (with the first letter signifying germanium, the second showing it to be a general purpose diode). Despite the fact that the label is European, the same diode, with the same label, can be found in the United States. In the European labeling: First Letter Material germanium silicon gallium arsenide, etc. photo diodes, etc. second Letter Purpose general purpose tuning (varicap) tunnel photovoltaic light emitting (LED) controlled rectifier varactor power rectifier zener A B C A B 0 a T X y Z E P With zener diodes, an additional letter may follow the number. This is the tolerance rating. A B 1% 2% C o 5% 10% Some of these conventions can be found in the United States. Cross references for diodes that fulfill the same specifications are easily located (and are sometimes printed on the package). Page 4 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes Also common in the United States is the IN and 2N prefix, which is generally taken to mean that the device is from National Semiconductor, with IN being a diode and 2N being a transistor. To make matters more confusing, the casing type may (and often does) have more than one designation. DO- is a military designation. A DO-7 case.is glass, 7.6 mm long 2.5 mm in diameter. This same casing can be DO-204AA, which is military low··cost. And the same is available as Case 51-02, which generally refers to a consumer product. Do not worry about this too much. Virtually every parts supplier can cross reference. Complete cross reference guides are also available should you wish to purchase one. These contain data about all the different semiconductors, often up to and including ICs and CPUs. (If those are contained, pin-outs and other K 1411 A 007 ~I KlI:::JA Cia. 2.5 0015 ~I KOA I~I '" + Dia.3.2 0027 K([JA Oia.5.33 4.25 0035 K~A [(::J Dia. 5.2 1.85 ~~ + o 0 ~ 0041 Kf4-1 A DDia.2.71 IAIl dimensions in mml Bridge types [ZJ o+ ""' 0 K A Figure 5: Diode casings Page 5 Section 3 • Electronic Repair Basics 3/2 Electronic Fundamentals 3/2 - C 3/2 - C - AC 3/2 - C - AC - D Components Active Components Diodes technical data for the devices are often given.) Motorola, one of the world's largest producers of semiconductor devices, has more than 50 parts sales offices across the country, and a central office which distributes literature. This includes "The Motorola Semiconductor Master Selection Guide," which is considered by many to be the definitive reference source on semiconductor cross-referencing and data. Those with computers can get all this information on disk, making access even easier. The software is available through a Motorola sales office, through the Motorola Literature Distribution center, and even via download from various computer BBS around the country. If you can't find it in your area, contact: Motorola Literature Distribution Center PO Box 20912 Phoenix, AZ 85036 The following are some typical diode listings and specificatiqns (R = Reverse; F =Forward): Example Germanium Diodes Type AA113 AA116 AA117 AA118 AA119 AA143 AA144 GD731 GD741 1N55A 1N55B 1N60 1N87 1N98A 1N100A 1N270 1N276 1N277 R Voltage 60 20 90 90 30 25 90 40 40 150 180 50 22.5 80 80 80 50 120 F Voltage 1.1 1.0 1.2 1.05 1.5 0.33 1.0

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

#1 CD Ripper :: 2005-04-19 :: 53
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.31 :: 2003-10-19 :: 59
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.34 :: 2003-10-19 :: 48
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.35 :: 2003-11-17 :: 52
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.36 :: 2003-11-17 :: 55
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.38 :: 2003-12-03 :: 63
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.39 :: 2003-12-15 :: 65
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.40 :: 2004-01-05 :: 58
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.41 :: 2004-01-18 :: 42
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.42 :: 2004-01-18 :: 58
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.43 :: 2004-02-02 :: 64
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.46 :: 2004-03-15 :: 52
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.48 :: 2004-04-02 :: 65
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.68 :: 2005-02-13 :: 40
#1 CD Ripper 1.72.69 :: 2005-02-13 :: 67
#1 CD Ripper v1.72.83 :: 2006-01-27 :: 71
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 26
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 45
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.24 :: 2005-02-13 :: 56
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.26 :: 2005-02-13 :: 66
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.5 :: 2004-03-15 :: 43
#1 DVD Audio Ripper 1.0.7 :: 2004-04-02 :: 60
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.08 :: 2003-09-02 :: 60
#1 DVD Ripper 01.03.1936 :: 2004-12-16 :: 54
#1 DVD Ripper 1.2.06 :: 2003-08-02 :: 68
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.0.8 :: 2003-10-02 :: 64
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.10 :: 2003-09-16 :: 63
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.11 :: 2003-10-02 :: 60
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.13 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.14 :: 2003-11-04 :: 57
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.16 :: 2003-11-17 :: 65
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.17 :: 2003-12-02 :: 68
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.21 :: 2004-01-15 :: 63
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.24 :: 2004-03-01 :: 82
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.25 :: 2004-03-15 :: 71
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.26 :: 2004-11-03 :: 18
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.31 :: 2004-11-08 :: 26
#1 DVD Ripper 1.3.32 :: 2005-02-13 :: 75
#1 DVD Ripper 2.8.0 :: 2006-04-26 :: 32
#1 DVD Ripper 2.9.0 :: 2006-05-02 :: 83
#1 DVD Ripper 3.0 :: 2006-05-18 :: 76
#1 DVD Ripper 3.1 :: 2006-05-28 :: 80
#1 DVD Ripper 4.0 :: 2006-08-12 :: 58
#1 DVD Ripper 5.3 :: 2007-07-19 :: 87
#1 DVD Ripper SE 1.3.40 :: 2005-01-29 :: 80
#1 DVD Ripper SE 1.3.50 :: 2005-09-20 :: 78
#1 DVD Ripper v2.0 :: 2006-03-26 :: 19
#1 DVD Ripper V5 :: 2007-01-06 :: 83
#1 Popup Blocker 2.0 :: 2004-07-06 :: 37
#1 Screen Capture :: 2003-08-02 :: 54
#1 Screen Capture 3.1 :: 2003-06-17 :: 62
#1 Video Converter 3.1.2 :: 2004-03-15 :: 57
#1 Video Converter 3.1.4 :: 2004-04-02 :: 64
#1 Video Converter 3.5.1 :: 2004-09-24 :: 66
#1 Video Converter 3.6.2 :: 2005-02-13 :: 65
#1 Video Converter 3.6.3 :: 2005-02-13 :: 67
#1 video converter 3.8.1 :: 2005-05-12 :: 68
#1 video converter 3.8.4 :: 2005-06-16 :: 40
#1 Video Converter 316a :: 2004-04-03 :: 68
#1 Video Converter 4.0.1 :: 2006-01-23 :: 45
#1 Video Converter 4.1.11 :: 2006-06-24 :: 73
#1 Video Converter 4.1.14 :: 2006-08-12 :: 74
#1 Video Converter 4.1.25 :: 2007-02-26 :: 72
#1 Video Converter 4.1.27 :: 2007-04-02 :: 80
#1 Video Converter 4.1.6 :: 2006-04-26 :: 31
#1 Video Converter 4.1.8 :: 2006-05-28 :: 64
#1 Video Converter Version 3.6.14 :: 2005-03-26 :: 40
#1 Video Convertor 4.1.14 serial by Extreme Team :: 2006-09-25 :: 69
#1 Video Convertor 4.1.8 :: 2006-05-29 :: 23
#1 Video Convertor v4.1.4 :: 2006-09-08 :: 33
#1.Video.Converter.v4.1.3 :: 2006-03-09 :: 73
#PC#Protect Stealth Activity Monitor V 4.01 :: 2003-04-14 :: 62
$tock Exchange :: 2002-10-18 :: 60
(EAsports) Cricket 2002 :: 2005-10-04 :: 63
(Sonic) MyDvd :: 2005-03-28 :: 55
++Mail v.2.0 :: 2006-02-12 :: 63
.mobile for Desktop PC 1.0.40603.0 :: 2004-07-06 :: 64
00 Defrag Professional Edition 4.0.508 :: 2002-03-19 :: 15
001 Joiner & Spliter Pro 3.0 :: 2007-09-24 :: 42
001 MP3 Encoder 1.0 :: 2002-03-01 :: 14
007 DVD Copy 1.2 :: 2006-01-10 :: 29
007 DVD Copy 5.0 :: 2006-01-31 :: 65
007 DVD Copy v5.10 :: 2006-05-02 :: 48
007 DVD Copy v5.16 :: 2006-08-22 :: 33
007 DVD Copy v5.17 :: 2006-09-01 :: 57
007 DVD Copy v5.33 :: 2006-10-25 :: 80
007 DVD Creator 2.2 :: 2006-01-10 :: 82
007 DVD Maker v3.0.0.45 Keymaker :: 2006-07-03 :: 29
007 DVD Maker v3.0.0.48 :: 2006-07-16 :: 20
007 DVD Maker v3.2.0.0 Keymaker :: 2006-05-02 :: 38
007 DVD Maker v3.49 :: 2006-08-04 :: 100
007 DVD Maker v3.52 :: 2006-09-08 :: 100
007 DVD Maker v3.62 :: 2006-10-18 :: 87
007 James Bond :: 2005-01-23 :: 62
007 MP3 Sound Recorder 1.20 :: 2006-01-10 :: 56
007 night fire :: 2005-09-26 :: 65
007 Nightfire :: 2004-10-05 :: 79
007 Spy Software 3.873 :: 2007-01-09 :: 86
007 Spy Software 2.50 :: 2003-09-02 :: 29
007 Spy Software 3.0 Pro :: 2003-09-02 :: 64
007 Spy Software 3.03 :: 2003-10-17 :: 61
007 Spy Software 3.04 :: 2003-11-04 :: 55
007 Spy Software 3.12 :: 2003-12-02 :: 59
007 Spy Software 3.13 :: 2003-12-02 :: 26
007 Spy Software 3.14 :: 2003-12-02 :: 60
007 Spy Software 3.17 :: 2003-12-15 :: 62
007 Spy Software 3.18 :: 2004-01-05 :: 62
007 Spy Software 3.19 :: 2004-01-05 :: 67
007 Spy Software 3.20 :: 2004-03-01 :: 44
007 Spy Software 3.32 :: 2004-03-01 :: 58
007 spy software new :: 2007-02-23 :: 85
007 STARR Internet & PC Ueberwachung 1.34 :: 2002-08-02 :: 89
007 Stealth Activity Recorder & Reporter v1.3 :: 2004-06-01 :: 50
008soft File Tree Printer v3.1.6.83 :: 2006-03-31 :: 47
010 Editor 1.0.1 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
010 Editor 1.1 :: 2003-11-17 :: 61
010 Editor 1.2 :: 2004-02-16 :: 55
010 Editor 1.3 :: 2004-04-28 :: 50
010 Editor 2.0.1 :: 2005-05-03 :: 44
010 Editor 2.0.2 :: 2005-07-13 :: 70
010 Editor v2.0.3 :: 2006-12-07 :: 69
010 Memorizer 1.1 :: 2004-01-05 :: 60
0190Killer 1.X :: 2002-08-02 :: 60
01W Editor for Win95 1 :: 2003-09-02 :: 62
024h Lucky Reminder 1.41 :: 2004-09-17 :: 75
024h Lucky Reminder 1.5 :: 2004-06-04 :: 50
024H Lucky Reminder 1.62 :: 2004-12-16 :: 44
024h Lucky Reminder 1.71 :: 2005-01-10 :: 78
024h Lucky Reminder 1.80 :: 2005-05-21 :: 55
024H Lucky Reminder 1.81 :: 2005-05-30 :: 67
024H Lucky Reminder v1.83 :: 2007-01-06 :: 80
0FeQudf78uDTjn8inRwPWy4h-P7C861jx-3-10001.txt :: 2007-09-26 :: 0
1 ACE Search Engine Submission 1.0.0 :: 2002-01-23 :: 17
1 CD Ripper 1.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 37
1 CD Ripper 1.61 :: 2003-09-16 :: 36
1 CD Ripper 1.72.24 :: 2003-09-02 :: 61
1 Click & Lock 1.50 :: 2002-08-02 :: 82
1 Click & Lock 2.72 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
1 Click And Lock 2.81 :: 2005-10-23 :: 46
1 Click And Lock v2.9 :: 2006-08-13 :: 62
1 Click And Lock v3.2 :: 2007-01-21 :: 46
1 click anyDvd copy :: 2005-04-30 :: 29
1 click boost :: 2006-12-18 :: 17
1 Click DVD Copy :: 2006-05-10 :: 8
1 Click DVD Ripper :: 2005-01-03 :: 26
1 Click DVD Ripper v2.03 :: 2005-01-03 :: 52
1 Click DVD Ripper 2.03 :: 2005-01-03 :: 65
1 Click DVD to DivX avi :: 2004-11-03 :: 58
1 Click DVD to VCD :: 2004-12-28 :: 56
1 click DVD TO VCD 2.08 :: 2005-09-15 :: 62
1 Click PC Fix :: 2006-03-31 :: 6
1 click pc fix 2006 :: 2006-07-04 :: 7
1 Click Runner 2.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 33
1 Click Unzip! 3.0.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 47
1 Click Wallpaper 1.2 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
1 DVD Ripper :: 2005-04-19 :: 33
1 DVD Ripper 1.2.05 :: 2003-07-19 :: 32
1 Form Proposal - Invoice 1.4 :: 2004-01-05 :: 20
1 Form Proposal - Invoice 1.5 :: 2004-02-16 :: 38
1 Form Proposal Invoice 1.1 :: 2003-08-13 :: 60
1 Form Proposal-Invoice 1.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 54
1 Form Proposal-Invoice 1.2 :: 2003-09-02 :: 54
1 Form Proposal-Invoice 1.31 :: 2003-10-02 :: 36
1 Form Proposal-Invonce v1.31 :: 2003-11-16 :: 23
1 Great Craps Game 1.3.6 :: 2004-07-06 :: 80
1 Moon Above 2.2 :: 2005-02-22
1 Moon Above 3D Screensaver :: 2004-06-01 :: 42
1 Moon Above 3D Screensaver v4.3 :: 2007-09-26 :: 80
1 Moon Above 4.0 :: 2005-01-25 :: 33
1 Moon Above 4.2 :: 2005-01-25 :: 61
1 More Photo Calender 1.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 63
1 More PhotoCalendar 1.0 German :: 2003-05-11 :: 63
1 More PhotoCalendar 1.21 :: 2003-10-02 :: 43
1 more scanner 1.06 :: 2003-10-02 :: 57
1 More Watermaker 1.00 :: 2003-10-02 :: 71
1 More Watermarker 1.20 :: 2005-03-08 :: 75
1 Screen Capture :: 2003-05-11 :: 50
1 st DVD Ripper 5.0.7 :: 2004-07-20 :: 28
1 st DVS Ripper 5.0.7 :: 2004-06-04 :: 16
1 st Mass Mailer 2.3 :: 2003-09-02 :: 68
1 Step MP3 to Audio CD Maker 2.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 51
1 VSTi 2.0.3 :: 2005-06-16 :: 40
1- More PhotoCalendar 1.20 :: 2003-09-02 :: 60
1-2-3 Key :: 2005-03-01 :: 42
1-2-Convert 1.0 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
1-4-All 2.10 :: 2005-03-01 :: 40
1-ACT AntiVirus 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 45
1-ACT Computer Spy 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 18
1-ACT Registry Cleaner 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 15
1-ACT Spyware Remover 2006 :: 2006-05-06 :: 35
1-Calc 3.2.2 German :: 2007-07-19 :: 33
1-Click Duplicate Delete for Outlook v1.09 :: 2007-11-24
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.1 :: 2003-07-19 :: 40
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.10 :: 2004-02-02 :: 50
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.20 :: 2003-08-02 :: 46
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.30 :: 2003-10-19 :: 65
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.50 :: 2004-04-02 :: 86
1-More PhotoCalendar 1.71 german :: 2004-12-16 :: 63
1-More PhotoCalender 1.0 :: 2003-05-18 :: 63
1-More PhotoManager 1.20 :: 2004-06-16 :: 40
1-More Scanner 1.05 :: 2003-04-19 :: 64
1-More Scanner 1.06 :: 2003-05-18 :: 65
1-More Scanner 1.10 :: 2004-04-02 :: 72
1-More Watermaker :: 2004-09-17 :: 66
1-More WaterMark 1.10 :: 2004-04-02 :: 60
1-More Watermarker 1.0 German :: 2003-07-12 :: 72
1-More Watermarker 1.00 German :: 2004-04-28 :: 88
1-More Watermarker 1.02 :: 2003-11-17 :: 33
1-more Webcam 1.03 :: 2005-10-02 :: 18
1-more-scanner 1.06 :: 2003-05-18 :: 44
1-Net Pal 1.1b :: 2005-03-01 :: 30
1-Net Pal 1.2d :: 2005-03-01 :: 33
1-PhotoCalendar :: 2004-09-17 :: 83
100% Zonealarm security suite 5.5.094 :: 2005-07-17 :: 70
1000 Lots Of Happiness In The Game 1.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 75
1000 Serials 2.0 :: 2005-11-03 :: 63
10DRemote 1.1 :: 2003-11-04 :: 40
12 Ghosts HiSpirit XP 15 :: 2002-06-04 :: 69
123 Avi to Gif Converter 1.0 :: 2003-04-02 :: 63
123 Avi to Gif converter 3.0 :: 2007-07-19 :: 59
123 AVI to GIF Converter ver 3.0 full :: 2006-07-02 :: 28
123 Bulk Email Direct Sender 2003 3.40 :: 2003-08-17 :: 45
123 Bulk Email Direct Sender 2005 Build 3.50 :: 2005-03-08 :: 33
123 Bulk Email Direct Sender.2006 v4.79 :: 2006-08-25 :: 58
123 CD Ripper 1.80 :: 2002-10-04 :: 12
123 CD Ripper 2.10 :: 2005-07-13 :: 42
123 DVD Ripper v1.00 :: 2006-07-31 :: 66
123 Flash Compressor 1.00 :: 2005-02-13 :: 19
123 Flash Image Extractor 1.00 :: 2005-02-13 :: 37
123 Flash Menu 1.02 :: 2004-01-18 :: 75
123 Flash Menu 1.5 :: 2005-07-13 :: 53
123 Flash Menu 1.6.4 :: 2005-10-10 :: 26
123 Flash Menu v1.6.1 - 1.6.4 :: 2006-01-27 :: 84
123 Flash Menü :: 2005-08-05 :: 55
123 Flash Screensaver Maker Professional Plus Editor 2.0.2.242 :: 2003-06-01 :: 31
123 Flash Sound Extractor 1.00 :: 2006-10-02 :: 13
123 Flash Sound/Image Extractor 1.00 :: 2005-02-22 :: 16
123 Hidden Sender 2.41 :: 2003-08-17 :: 42
123 MP3 Wav Converter & Player 3.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 45
123 MP3 Wav Converter&Player 3.1 :: 2003-02-16 :: 21
123 Outlook Express Backup 1.02 :: 2004-06-04 :: 20
123 Pet 5.1.7 :: 2005-11-07 :: 44
123 Pet 5.1.8 :: 2005-11-21 :: 33
123 Photo Screensaver Builder Professional Plus 2.0.2.239 :: 2003-06-01 :: 39
123 Popup Maker v1.01 :: 2006-12-15 :: 53
123 Screensaver Maker 2.2 :: 2002-05-15 :: 14
123 Screensaver Maker 3.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 35
123 Sound Recorder :: 2005-04-19 :: 21
123 video converter :: 2006-05-11 :: 15
123 WashALL Pro 3.15 :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
123.DVD Ripper 1.00 :: 2007-09-26 :: 0
123ColorPicker 1.2 :: 2002-01-23 :: 25
123copydvd :: 2007-05-18 :: 10
123di 3.0 :: 2005-02-20 :: 21
123icon hunter v1.0 boilsoft :: 2004-07-30 :: 56
123IconHunter 1.0 :: 2003-02-02 :: 75
123Pe 4.2.7 :: 2004-06-04 :: 50
123Pet 4.2.7 :: 2004-06-04 :: 60
123Pet 4.2.8 :: 2004-08-01 :: 50
123Pet 4.3.4 :: 2004-12-16 :: 0
123pet 4.4.0 :: 2005-01-25 :: 33
123Pet 5.0.8 :: 2005-07-18 :: 25
123Pet 5.0.9 :: 2005-08-22 :: 44
123Pet 5.05 :: 2005-04-14 :: 62
123Pet 5.1.0 :: 2005-08-14 :: 37
123Pet 5.1.1 :: 2005-08-24 :: 28
123Pet 5.1.3 :: 2005-09-21 :: 25
123Pet 5.1.5 :: 2005-09-26 :: 44
123Pet 5.2.0 :: 2006-01-10 :: 30
123Pet 5.2.1 :: 2006-03-05 :: 33
123Pet 5.2.2 :: 2006-03-07 :: 50
123Pet v5.2.3 :: 2006-05-02 :: 20
123Pet v6.0.1 :: 2006-07-26 :: 33
123Pet v6.0.2 :: 2006-08-22 :: 0
123Pet v6.0.3 :: 2006-09-19 :: 50
123Pet v6.0.4 :: 2006-10-25 :: 62
123Pet v6.0.5 :: 2006-12-20 :: 37
123Pet v6.0.7 :: 2007-01-30 :: 50
123Pet v6.1.0 :: 2007-09-26 :: 50
123Tag 1.1.13 :: 2002-08-18 :: 27
123Tag 1.11 :: 2004-01-05 :: 27
123Tag 1.14.2 :: 2004-07-01 :: 60
123Tag v1.34 :: 2007-11-24
123Violino German 1.01 :: 2004-02-16 :: 53
123WashAll Professional 3.15 :: 2003-07-19 :: 29
128Gamma Encryption 3.5 :: 2002-10-04 :: 100
12GHOST HISPIRITS XP :: 2004-06-15 :: 75
12Ghost SuperGee v6.0.10 :: 2003-01-05 :: 45
12Ghosts HiSpirts XP 5.05 :: 2002-02-02 :: 66
12Ghosts Pro v21.05b :: 2006-07-11 :: 33
12Ghosts Pro v21.60 :: 2004-06-01 :: 20
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 37
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.1.1 :: 2003-02-02 :: 36
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.1.2 :: 2003-02-02 :: 31
12Ghosts SuperGee 6.15 :: 2003-10-19 :: 28
12Ghosts SuperGee Backup 7.02.3738 :: 2003-11-03 :: 80
12Ghosts SuperGee Shredder 7.02.3738 :: 2003-11-03 :: 77
12Ghosts Wash XP 6.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 22
13 Out Card Game 4.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 75
1503 A.D : A New World :: 2004-02-02 :: 93
1503 A.D: The New Wor s/n: ld :: 2004-05-02 :: 81
1503 AD The New World :: 2003-10-06 :: 85
16 VSTi 2.0.3 :: 2005-06-16 :: 54
1930 Ford Screen Saver Retail :: 2002-02-02 :: 25
1939 BattleFleet 1.5 :: 2003-07-19 :: 17
1999 The World Book Encyclopedia :: 2004-03-15 :: 69
1Click & Lock v2.72 :: 2004-07-20 :: 33
1Click DVD Copy :: 2005-06-18 :: 7
1Click DVD Copy 3.0.0.5 :: 2004-07-16 :: 7
1Click Dvd Copy 4.1 :: 2005-01-23 :: 7
1Click DVD Copy 4.1.1.4 :: 2005-03-07 :: 8
1Click DVD Copy 4.1.1.8 :: 2005-05-21 :: 11
1Click DVD Copy 4.2.9.1 :: 2005-11-07 :: 7
1Click DVD Copy 4.2.9.2 :: 2005-12-12 :: 8
1Click DVD Ripper 2.03 :: 2005-05-03 :: 74
1Click DVD to Divx Avi 1.21 :: 2003-12-15 :: 72
1click dvd to mpeg mpg 1.13 :: 2005-08-02 :: 29
1Click DVD to VCD 2.08 :: 2003-12-15 :: 69
1ClickDc :: 2007-03-10 :: 33
1ClickUnzip 3.00 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
1ClickWebSlideShow 2.0.0.24 :: 2003-04-02 :: 60
1ClickWebSlideShow 2.0.0.27 :: 2003-05-11 :: 37
1ClickWebSlideShow 2.0.0.28 :: 2003-06-01 :: 70
1DVDRiper v1.2.06 :: 2003-07-26 :: 31
1st Audio MP3 Maker 1.13 :: 2002-07-15 :: 58
1st Audio Splitter Extractor 1.25 :: 2005-02-13 :: 52
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 1.59 :: 2002-07-02 :: 50
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2.10 :: 2002-07-15 :: 19
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2.15 :: 2002-08-02 :: 17
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2002 1.55 :: 2002-08-02 :: 14
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2002 1.59 :: 2002-08-02 :: 18
1st Bulk Email Direct Sender 2002 Build 1.59 :: 2002-09-04 :: 36
1st Choice FTP Pro 8.30 :: 2002-03-01 :: 28
1st Choice FTPPro2000 v7.6 :: 2006-07-11 :: 0
1st Choics Browse 98 4.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 0
1st Class Image Viewer 6.01 :: 2002-05-15 :: 33
1st Desktop Guard 1.4 :: 2004-03-01 :: 80
1st Desktop Guard 1.5 :: 2004-09-17 :: 71
1st Desktop Guard 1.6 :: 2005-07-18 :: 21
1st Desktop Guard v1.7 :: 2006-05-19 :: 50
1st Desktop Guard v1.8 :: 2006-08-13 :: 45
1st Directory Email Spider 2002 1.18 :: 2002-08-02 :: 30
1st Directory Email Spider 2005 1.30 :: 2005-02-22 :: 57
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.50 :: 2006-08-25 :: 70
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.50-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 0
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.62 :: 2006-10-22 :: 80
1st Directory Email Spider.2006 v4.62-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 87
1st Disk Drive Protector v1.4 :: 2006-08-13 :: 50
1st DVD ripper 5.0.7 :: 2004-10-10 :: 37
1st Email Address Harvester 1.46 :: 2002-07-02 :: 36
1st Email Address Harvester 2.02 :: 2002-07-15 :: 16
1st Email Address Spider 2.83 :: 2002-07-02 :: 25
1st Email Address Spider 2.94 :: 2002-07-15 :: 3
1st Email Address Spider 2005 3.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 28
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.48 :: 2006-05-19 :: 38
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.50-DVT :: 2006-07-16 :: 55
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.58 :: 2006-08-25 :: 93
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.58-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 62
1st Email Address Spider.2006 v5.70 :: 2006-10-22 :: 87
1st Email Address Verifier 1.17 :: 2002-08-02 :: 13
1st Email Address Verifier.2006 v4.60 :: 2006-08-25 :: 66
1st Email Address Verifier.2006 v4.60-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 100
1st Email Address Verifier.2006 v4.74 :: 2006-10-22 :: 64
1st Email Adress Spider.2006 v5.70-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 64
1st Email Adress Verifier.2006 v4.74-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 30
1st Evidence Remover :: 2006-06-27 :: 81
1st Evidence Remover 1.6 :: 2003-11-04 :: 55
1st Evidence Remover 1.7 :: 2004-03-01 :: 69
1st Evidence Remover 2.1 :: 2005-08-22 :: 61
1st Evidence Remover 2.3 :: 2007-09-26 :: 25
1st Evidence Remover v2.2 :: 2006-05-19 :: 54
1st Evidence Remover v2.2 REAL :: 2006-07-10 :: 53
1st Fax Extractor 3.02 :: 2005-03-29 :: 33
1st Fax Extractor v5.56-DVT :: 2006-08-22 :: 83
1st Fax Extractor v5.56_ :: 2006-08-25 :: 25
1st Fax Extractor v5.69 :: 2006-10-22 :: 33
1st Fax Extractor v5.69-DVT :: 2006-10-22 :: 20
1st Go Warkanoid II Total Edition 2.89 :: 2003-10-02 :: 82
1st Go Warkanoid II Total v2.8.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 75
1st Go Warkanoid II WildLife 2.8.1 :: 2003-02-16 :: 46
1st Go Warkanoid II Wildlife Multilingual 2.7.7 :: 2002-03-19 :: 62
1st Go Warkanoid II WildLife v2.8.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 85
1st Go Warkanoid II WildLife v2.80 :: 2003-01-18 :: 40
1st Go Warkanoid II: WildLife 2.8.3 :: 2003-02-16 :: 73
1st HTML Editor 2.03 :: 2003-07-19 :: 27
1st Journal 1.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 57
1st Look 2.0.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 23
1st Mail Bomber 9.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 83
1st Mail Bomber Pro :: 2003-06-01 :: 44
1st Mail Sender 2.5 :: 2004-01-15 :: 60
1st Mail Sender 2.6 :: 2005-01-10 :: 83
1st Mail Sender v3.1 :: 2006-08-13 :: 58
1st Mail Server v1.7 :: 2006-08-13 :: 89
1st Mail Server v2.1 :: 2006-12-24 :: 58
1st Mass Mailer 1.8 :: 2003-03-03 :: 30
1st Mass Mailer 2.5 :: 2005-02-13 :: 87
1st Mass Mailer 2.6 :: 2004-07-16 :: 88
1st Mass Mailer 3.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 56
1st mass mailer V2.6 :: 2005-09-12 :: 75
1st Mass Mailer v3.1 :: 2006-08-13 :: 73
1st MP3 Wav Converter 2.60 :: 2001-09-10 :: 58
1st Network Admin v1.6 :: 2006-08-13 :: 22
1st Network Admin v2.0 :: 2007-01-21 :: 50
1st Screen Lock 6.0 :: 2004-08-01 :: 65
1st Screen Lock v6.4 :: 2006-06-26 :: 44
1st Screen Lock v6.5 :: 2006-08-09 :: 57
1st Screen Saver Studio key v2.0 :: 2006-03-21 :: 28
1st Screensaver PHOTO Studio Pro Plus 2.02.177 :: 2003-05-11 :: 54
1st Security Administrator Pro :: 2003-06-01 :: 26
1st Security Agent 1.2 :: 2002-02-13 :: 25
1st Security Agent 2.1 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
1st Security Agent 3.3 :: 2002-09-04 :: 14
1st Security Agent 4.1 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
1st Security Agent 4.2 :: 2002-10-17 :: 12
1st Security Agent 4.7 :: 2003-06-17 :: 23
1st Security Agent 4.8 :: 2003-03-03 :: 79
1st Security Agent 5.2 :: 2003-12-15 :: 72
1st Security Agent 5.3 :: 2004-02-16 :: 63
1st Security Agent 6.0 :: 2005-01-03 :: 77
1st Security Agent 6.1 :: 2005-10-17 :: 86
1st Security Agent v4.6 :: 2003-01-05 :: 53
1st Security Agent v6.4 :: 2006-06-26 :: 70
1st Security Agent v6.5 :: 2006-08-22 :: 69
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security 6.1 :: 2005-10-17 :: 27
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.2 :: 2006-05-19 :: 33
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.3 :: 2006-06-04 :: 33
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.4 REAL :: 2006-07-10 :: 27
1st Security Agent with IE Internet Security v6.5 :: 2006-08-09 :: 64
1st Security Agent with.1st Screen Lock v6.2 :: 2006-05-19 :: 42
1st Security Agent with.1st Screen Lock v6.3 :: 2006-06-04 :: 18
1st Security Center Pro 4.2 :: 2004-12-16 :: 45
1st Simple HTML Editor 2.0.3 :: 2003-05-18 :: 44
1st Simple HTML Editor 2.1 Build 5 :: 2003-10-19 :: 15
1st SMTP Server 2.2 :: 2003-05-18 :: 87
1st SMTP Server 2.4 :: 2004-03-01 :: 83
1st SMTP Server v2.6 :: 2006-04-04 :: 66
1st SMTP Server v2.7 :: 2006-05-19 :: 62
1st SMTP Server v2.8 :: 2006-08-13 :: 88
1st SMTP Server v2.9 :: 2007-01-09 :: 85
1st Sound Recorder :: 2005-04-19 :: 64
1st Sound Recorder 2.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 47
1st Sound Recorder 4.1.63 :: 2003-02-16 :: 81
1st Sound Recorder 4.1.71 :: 2003-04-02 :: 46
1st Sound Recorder 4.1.75 :: 2003-04-19 :: 91
1st Source 1.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 46
1st STMP Server 2.5 :: 2004-08-01 :: 54
1st There 1.1 :: 2004-01-18 :: 50
1st There 1.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
1st video converter v5.3.7 :: 2004-11-03 :: 42
1st Warkanoid II : Total 2.8.2 :: 2003-02-16 :: 30
1st Warkanoid II : WildLife 2.8.1 :: 2003-02-16 :: 60
1st Warkanoid II : WildLife 2.9.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 57
1st Webcollector 1.28 :: 2002-08-18 :: 33
1st Webcollector 1.68 :: 2002-10-17 :: 35
1stCalendar :: 2006-10-07 :: 0
1stCalendar 1.1 :: 2005-03-08 :: 44
1stCalendar 1.2 :: 2005-04-08 :: 23
1stclass 3000.5 :: 2002-03-11 :: 76
1step MP to CD.maker 1.2.2 :: 2002-01-23 :: 50
1Step MP3 To Audio CD Maker 2.0.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 47
1Stop Organizer v1.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 62
1toX 2.57 :: 2002-01-23 :: 38
1toX 2.59 :: 2002-02-13 :: 50
1toX 2.62 :: 2004-02-02 :: 40
1toX 2.63 :: 2004-02-02 :: 52
2 2.0 :: 2005-12-29 :: 33
2 Decoder and Streaming Pack 3.0 :: 2005-12-29 :: 40
2 Find MP3 :: 2006-10-04 :: 21
2 Power v1.1 :: 2003-01-05 :: 83
2+ Block Buster :: 2004-02-02 :: 40
20/200 2.2 :: 2005-02-17 :: 40
2000 1.08o :: 2005-02-13 :: 100
2000 1.10 :: 2005-04-14 :: 23
2000 1.10.2 :: 2005-02-22 :: 0
2000 1.10.5 :: 2005-10-14 :: 40
2000 1.11.1 :: 2006-03-05 :: 0
2000 Fractal Calendar :: 2006-07-11 :: 50
2000i :: 2004-06-01 :: 28
2000th Firestorm 2.0 (PC) :: 2003-02-14 :: 21
2000th Firestorm 2.0 Screensaver :: 2003-02-14 :: 17
2000th FireStorm Screen Saver :: 2002-01-23 :: 18
2000th HellFire Screen Saver :: 2003-12-28 :: 13
2001 TetRize 2.14 :: 2002-03-19 :: 71
2002 Fifa World Cup Korea Japan :: 2005-10-26 :: 88
2006 Fifa World Cup :: 2006-06-13 :: 49
2006 FIFA World Cup (TM) :: 2006-07-30 :: 72
21 And Fast 1.26.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 20
21 Dic 5.0 :: 2004-01-18 :: 20
21 Flying Images Screen Saver :: 2002-01-23 :: 58
21 Hearts 1.0 :: 2003-08-17 :: 55
232Analyzer 4.1 :: 2006-03-07 :: 33
232Analyzer v4.3 :: 2006-05-02 :: 58
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.13 :: 2003-10-02 :: 50
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.16 :: 2003-12-15 :: 75
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.17 :: 2004-03-01 :: 50
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.21 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.24 :: 2005-02-13 :: 75
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.5 :: 2003-05-11 :: 25
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.6 :: 2003-05-18 :: 58
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.7 :: 2003-06-01 :: 43
24x7 Automation Suite 3.4.8 :: 2003-06-17 :: 68
24x7 Scheduler Java Edition 2.1.104 :: 2005-05-03 :: 52
24x7 Scheduler Java Edition 2.1.95 :: 2005-04-08 :: 30
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 3.2.7.410 :: 2005-03-18 :: 73
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 4.0.3 :: 2005-08-23 :: 39
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 4.0.4 :: 2005-09-21 :: 30
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE 4.0.6 :: 2005-12-07 :: 35
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE v4.0.10 :: 2006-10-18 :: 85
2BrightSparks SyncBackSE v4.0.8 :: 2006-05-11 :: 67
2D 3D Puzzle Dreamy Kiss v1.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 81
2D 3D Puzzle Flowers No1 v1.0 :: 2003-01-05 :: 88
2D 3D Puzzle Say I Do 1.0 :: 2003-02-02 :: 30
2D 3D Puzzle War Craft No1 1.0 :: 2003-02-02 :: 55
2D 3D Screensaver Maker 3.10 :: 2005-10-31 :: 28
2D 3D Screensaver Maker 3.61 :: 2007-09-26 :: 50
2D and 3D Animator Deluxe 1.4 :: 2003-03-03 :: 60
2D and 3D Animator Deluxe v1.4 :: 2003-01-05 :: 60
2D DLL Aztec 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 33
2D DLL DataMatrix 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 0
2D DLL MaxiCode 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 100
2D DLL PDF417 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 50
2D DLL RSS 3.30 :: 2005-01-10 :: 0
2D DLL Universal 3.30 :: 2005-01-10
2D IMG Server for IIS 2.0 :: 2005-01-10 :: 50
2D plus 3D_Screensaver_Maker_v3.6 :: 2007-09-26
2D Vector Pak for ACDSee 1.0 :: 2003-08-02 :: 56
2D&3D Animator 1.5 :: 2004-03-01 :: 59
2D+3D Screensaver Maker :: 2007-07-05 :: 30
2Flyer Screensaver Builder 3.0 :: 2002-02-13 :: 27
2Flyer Screensaver Builder 6.0.1 :: 2003-09-02 :: 27
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 4.8.2 :: 2002-10-04 :: 52
2flyer screensaver builder pro 5.0.0 :: 2003-03-10 :: 64
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 5.0.2 :: 2003-03-17 :: 55
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 5.2.1 :: 2003-05-18 :: 30
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 6.2.1 :: 2004-04-02 :: 73
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 6.3.5 :: 2004-12-16 :: 80
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.0 :: 2005-02-22 :: 78
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.1 :: 2005-04-14 :: 65
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.1.1 :: 2005-05-21 :: 43
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.2.0 :: 2005-08-14 :: 35
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.3.0 :: 2005-09-21 :: 53
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.3.1 :: 2005-10-17 :: 40
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.3.2 :: 2005-11-21 :: 50
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.4 :: 2006-02-05 :: 60
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro 7.4.1 :: 2006-03-07 :: 45
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro v7.5.0 :: 2006-04-04 :: 38
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro v7.5.4 :: 2006-09-19 :: 57
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Pro v7.6 :: 2006-11-20 :: 42
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Professional 4.71 :: 2002-08-02 :: 47
2Flyer Screensaver Builder Standard 5.0.2 :: 2003-03-17 :: 31
2Flyer Screensaver Builder v6.2.2 :: 2004-09-10 :: 60
2Gif 2.7 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
2JPEG 4.0 :: 2002-03-01 :: 72
2Jpeg v2.7 :: 2006-07-11 :: 25
2M Arcade Bubbles 1,3 :: 2003-09-16 :: 30
2M Arcade Bubbles 1.2 :: 2003-08-17 :: 37
2M Arcade Bubbles 1.4 :: 2003-11-04 :: 55
2M Arcade Bubbles 1.8 :: 2005-02-13 :: 80
2M Blocks Swapper :: 2004-08-14 :: 33
2M Blocks Swapper 1.4 :: 2003-04-19 :: 57
2M Blocks Swapper 1.5 :: 2003-05-11 :: 22
2M Blocks Swapper 1.6 :: 2003-06-01 :: 15
2M Blocks Swapper 1.8 :: 2003-09-02 :: 42
2M Blocks Swapper 2.0 :: 2003-11-17 :: 33
2M Blocks Swapper 2.1a :: 2004-01-15 :: 57
2M Blocks Swapper 2.2 :: 2004-04-28 :: 0
2M Blocks Swapper 2.4a :: 2005-02-13 :: 66
2M Blocks Swapper v1.5 :: 2003-04-28 :: 23
2M Bubble Lines 1.0a :: 2005-02-13 :: 42
2M Flower Garden 1,1 :: 2003-09-16 :: 41
2M Flower Garden 1.1a :: 2003-11-04 :: 61
2M Flower Garden 1.2 :: 2004-02-02 :: 42
2m Puzzles Letters 1.3 :: 2004-08-01 :: 37
2m Puzzles Letters 1.3b FR :: 2004-12-16 :: 0
2M Solitaires 1.3 :: 2003-04-19 :: 40
2M Solitaires Collection 1,8 :: 2003-09-16 :: 46
2M Solitaires Collection 1.12 :: 2004-04-28 :: 46
2M Solitaires Collection 1.3 :: 2003-08-02 :: 28
2M Solitaires Collection 1.4 :: 2003-05-11 :: 66
2M Solitaires Collection 1.5 :: 2003-06-01 :: 50
2M Solitaires Collection 1.7 :: 2003-08-17 :: 42
2M Solitaires Collection 1.9 :: 2003-11-04 :: 45
2M Solitaires Collection 2.0 :: 2004-06-16 :: 59
2M Solitaires Collection 2.0a :: 2005-02-13 :: 68
2M Solitaires Collection v1.4 :: 2003-04-28 :: 57
2M SolitairesCollection 1.1 :: 2004-01-05 :: 50
2M Tetrix Collection 1.4 :: 2003-04-19 :: 53
2M Tetrix Collection 1.5 :: 2003-05-11 :: 40
2M Tetrix Collection 1.6 :: 2003-06-01 :: 58
2M Tetrix Collection 2.1 :: 2003-11-17 :: 76
2M Tetrix Collection 2.1a :: 2003-12-02 :: 60
2M Tetrix Collection 2.3 :: 2004-04-28 :: 75
2M Tetrix Collection 2.4 :: 2004-06-16 :: 45
2M Tetrix Collection 2.5 :: 2005-02-13 :: 76
2M Tetrix Collection v1.5 :: 2003-04-28 :: 62
2M Words Collection 1.0 :: 2003-12-03 :: 54
2M Words Collection 1.2a :: 2005-02-13 :: 85
2nd Speech :: 2006-01-23 :: 20
2nd Speech Center 1.30 :: 2003-09-02 :: 50
2nd Speech Center 1.00 :: 2002-02-13 :: 57
2nd Speech Center 1.00 Build 020131 :: 2002-03-19 :: 57
2nd Speech Center 1.10 :: 2001-09-10 :: 66
2nd Speech Center 1.10 build 020415 :: 2002-08-18 :: 60
2nd Speech Center 1.21 :: 2002-07-15 :: 44
2nd Speech Center 1.21.020904 :: 2002-10-04 :: 42
2nd Speech Center 1.3 :: 2003-11-03 :: 50
2nd Speech Center 1.30 :: 2003-04-02 :: 71
2nd Speech Center 1.5 :: 2004-02-02 :: 68
2nd Speech Center 1.50.040216 :: 2004-03-01 :: 63
2nd Speech Center 2.00.041201 :: 2004-12-16 :: 76
2nd Speech Center 2.00.050103 :: 2005-01-31 :: 66
2nd Speech Center 2.00.050428 :: 2005-05-03 :: 50
2nd Speech Center 2.00.050508 :: 2005-05-21 :: 61
2nd Speech Center 3.00.050818 :: 2005-08-24 :: 56
2nd Speech Center 3.00.050830 :: 2005-09-21 :: 62
2nd Speech Center v3.30.7.1025 :: 2007-11-24
2of5 3.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 100
2Remember 1.02 :: 2004-02-02 :: 28
2SXSI-DUHGK-EWIX1-B1Q7F-845T.txt :: 2007-11-24 :: 0
2thumbs up v 2.0 :: 2002-06-17 :: 33
2X Application Server v3.6 :: 2006-06-26 :: 53
2x Cherry Slots All :: 2002-04-01 :: 62
2X Dynamite Slots 1.1 :: 2002-08-18 :: 44
2X Load Balancer v4.02 :: 2006-06-26 :: 44
2X Wild Stars 1.1 :: 2002-05-15 :: 42
2xCalc 5.2 :: 2002-03-01 :: 37
3 Blaster v1.1 :: 2003-01-05 :: 21
3 ds max 5 :: 2005-02-01 :: 44
3 gp video converter :: 2007-02-05 :: 27
3 webTotal TV & Radio Tuner :: 2006-07-31 :: 25
3-D GraphSaver 2.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 0
3-IN-A-BED (Three In a Bed) 2.01 :: 2005-03-01
3-IN-A-BED (Three In a Bed) 3.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 100
3-IN-A-BED 2.01 :: 2003-03-17 :: 13
30 Happy Easter Riddles Screen Saver 5.0 :: 2003-07-19 :: 66
30 Happy Easter Riddles Screen Saver 5.00 Us :: 2003-05-18 :: 25
30 Happy Easter Riddles Screensaver 5.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 37
30 Wildlife Scenes Screen Saver 5.00 :: 2004-06-16 :: 55
3001 Space Oddities 1.1.x :: 2003-08-17 :: 46
3001 Space Oddities Screen Saver 1.1.1 :: 2002-02-02 :: 62
31 release 4 (null) :: 2002-01-23 :: 40
32 Card Bridge 1.6 :: 2002-03-01 :: 75
32 Developers Kit 7.10 :: 2005-01-10 :: 33
321 Studios DVD Copy Plus 4.2.0 :: 2004-10-13 :: 12
321 Studios DVD Copy Plus 4.2 :: 2003-08-02 :: 15
321 Studios DVD X Copy Platinum 4.0.3.8 :: 2006-01-04 :: 12
32bit Convert It 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 25
32bit Convert It 9.36.18 :: 2002-01-23 :: 44
32bit Convert It 9.39.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 33
32bit Convert it 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 25
32bit Convert it 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
32bit Convert IT 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 33
32bit Convert IT 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 63
32bit Convert It 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 66
32bit Convert It 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 37
32bit Convert It 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 60
32bit Convert It 9.62.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 80
32bit Convert It 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 50
32bit Convert It 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.67.01 :: 2004-08-01 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13
32Bit Convert It 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 33
32Bit Convert It 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 66
32bit Convert It 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 45
32bit Convert It 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 45
32bit Convert It 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 31
32bit Convert It 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 40
32bit Convert It 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 50
32bit Convert It 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 18
32bit Convert It 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 9
32bit Convert It 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 30
32bit Convert It 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 36
32bit Convert It 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 33
32bit Convert It 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 16
32bit Convert It 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 53
32bit Convert It 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 40
32bit Convert It c9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 37
32Bit Convert It c9.73.01 :: 2005-01-11 :: 0
32bit Convert It c9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 21
32bit Convert It v07.09.01 :: 2007-10-04 :: 0
32bit Convert It v07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04
32bit Convert It v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 75
32bit Convert It v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 50
32bit Convert It v9.89.01 :: 2006-05-19 :: 37
32bit Convert It v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 0
32bit Convert It v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 75
32bit Convert It v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 14
32bit Convert It v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 0
32bit Convert It v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 45
32bit Convert It v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 83
32bit Convert It v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 33
32bit Convert It vc9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 24
32bit Email Broadcaster :: 2005-04-19 :: 36
32bit Email Broadcaster 07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.37.01 :: 2002-01-23 :: 20
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 25
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 20
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 38
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 11
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 14
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 28
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 66
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
32Bit Email Broadcaster 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 66
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 28
32Bit Email Broadcaster 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 55
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 35
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 12
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.78.10 :: 2005-07-13 :: 28
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 33
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 11
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 12
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 31
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 40
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 14
32bit Email Broadcaster 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.51.01 :: 2003-04-02 :: 31
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 50
32Bit Email Broadcaster e9.73.01 :: 2005-01-11 :: 60
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster e9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 38
32bit Email Broadcaster v07.09.01 :: 2007-10-04
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 66
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 46
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 37
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 36
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 75
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 100
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 0
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 20
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 50
32bit Email Broadcaster v9.97.01 :: 2007-01-20 :: 57
32bit Fax 9.42.01 :: 2001-09-10 :: 60
32bit Fax 9.43 :: 2002-07-15 :: 60
32bit Fax 9.43.01 :: 2002-07-15 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 71
32bit Fax 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 80
32bit Fax 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 81
32bit Fax 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 33
32bit Fax 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 15
32bit Fax 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 36
32bit Fax 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 44
32bit Fax 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 45
32bit Fax 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 25
32bit Fax 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
32bit Fax 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 20
32bit Fax 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 25
32Bit Fax 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 20
32bit Fax 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 9
32bit Fax 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 30
32bit Fax 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 38
32bit Fax 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 54
32bit Fax 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 38
32bit Fax 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 21
32bit Fax 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 28
32bit Fax 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 18
32bit Fax 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 66
32bit Fax 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 23
32bit Fax 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 43
32bit Fax 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 37
32bit Fax v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 0
32bit Fax v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 44
32bit Fax v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-31 :: 50
32bit Fax v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 40
32bit Fax v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 43
32bit Fax v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 50
32bit Fax v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 0
32bit Fax v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 0
32bit Fax v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 44
32bit Fax v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 61
32bit Fax x9 75.01 DateCode 03102005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 30
32bit Fax x9.57.01 :: 2003-10-02 :: 60
32bit Fax x9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 37
32bit Fax x9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 83
32Bit FaxAmatic 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 0
32bit FaxAmatic 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
32bit FaxAmatic 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 40
32bit FaxAmatic 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 61
32bit FaxAmatic 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 52
32bit FaxAmatic 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 70
32bit FaxAmatic 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 66
32bit FaxAmatic 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 33
32bit FaxAmatic 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit FaxAmatic 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 25
32bit FaxAmatic 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 70
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 72
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.46.01 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 40
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 60
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 20
32bit FaxMail for Windows 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 62
32Bit Faxmail Network 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 0
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 66
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 66
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.46.01 :: 2002-10-17 :: 88
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 71
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 16
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
32bit FaxMail Network for Windows 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 50
32bit FTP 9.42.01 :: 2001-09-10 :: 0
32bit FTP 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 25
32bit FTP 9.43.01 :: 2002-07-15 :: 100
32bit FTP 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 50
32bit FTP 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 0
32bit FTP 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 40
32bit FTP 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 100
32bit FTP 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 20
32bit FTP 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 50
32bit FTP 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 62
32bit FTP 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 30
32bit FTP 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 42
32bit FTP 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 40
32bit FTP 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
32Bit FTP 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 100
32bit FTP 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 40
32bit FTP 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 58
32Bit FTP 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 33
32bit FTP 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 9
32bit FTP 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 61
32bit FTP 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 26
32bit FTP 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 6
32bit FTP 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 27
32bit FTP 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 55
32bit FTP 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 0
32bit FTP 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 45
32bit FTP 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 31
32bit FTP 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 41
32bit FTP 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 40
32bit FTP p9.51 :: 2003-04-02 :: 27
32bit FTP p9.54.01 :: 2003-08-17 :: 55
32bit FTP p9.60.01 :: 2003-12-15 :: 0
32bit FTP p9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 42
32bit FTP p9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 0
32bit FTP p9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 42
32bit FTP v07.09.01 :: 2007-10-04
32bit FTP v07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04 :: 100
32bit FTP v07.10.01 :: 2007-11-24
32bit FTP v07.10.24 :: 2007-11-24
32bit FTP v9.47.22 :: 2003-01-05 :: 0
32bit FTP v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 69
32bit FTP v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 16
32bit FTP v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 50
32bit FTP v9.89.01 :: 2006-05-19 :: 50
32bit FTP v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 14
32bit FTP v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 71
32bit FTP v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 100
32bit FTP v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 50
32bit FTP v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25
32bit FTP v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 42
32bit FTP v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 12
32bit FTP v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 40
32bit Internet Fax 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 60
32bit Internet Fax 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 30
32bit Internet Fax 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 80
32bit Internet Fax 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 20
32bit Internet Fax 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 75
32bit Internet Fax 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13
32bit Internet Fax 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 33
32Bit Internet Fax 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 33
32bit Internet Fax 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 25
32bit Internet Fax 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 43
32bit Internet Fax 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 30
32bit Internet Fax 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 20
32bit Internet Fax 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 38
32bit Internet Fax 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 46
32bit Internet Fax 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 20
32bit Internet Fax 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 28
32bit Internet Fax 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 42
32bit Internet Fax 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 53
32bit Internet Fax 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 0
32bit Internet Fax i9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax i9.74.01 :: 2005-02-22 :: 16
32bit Internet Fax i9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 73
32bit Internet Fax i9.75.01 DateCode 03102005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 52
32bit Internet Fax i9.87.01 :: 2006-04-04 :: 44
32bit Internet Fax v7.09.07 :: 2007-10-04 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 100
32bit Internet Fax v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 66
32bit Internet Fax v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 33
32bit Internet Fax v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 37
32bit Internet Fax v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 37
32bit Internet Fax v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 50
32bit Internet Fax x9.51.0 :: 2003-04-06 :: 52
32Bit Multi Clipboard 9.39.01 :: 2001-09-10 :: 0
32Bit Multi Clipboard 9.40.01 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 8
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 55
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.69.01 :: 2005-02-13
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit Multi Clipboard 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 66
32bit MultiClipboard 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 60
32bit Service Monitor 9.38.01 :: 2003-06-17 :: 42
32bit Service Monitor 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 80
32bit Service Monitor 9.43.01 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
32Bit Service Monitor 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
32Bit Service Monitor 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
32Bit Service Monitor 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 71
32bit Service Monitor 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 60
32bit Service Monitor 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 75
32bit Service Monitor 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 20
32bit Service Monitor 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 62
32bit Service Monitor 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 100
32Bit Service Monitor 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16
32bit Service Monitor 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 75
32bit Service Monitor 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 0
32bit Service Monitor 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 53
32Bit Service Monitor 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 40
32bit Service Monitor 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 30
32bit Service Monitor 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 20
32bit Service Monitor 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 70
32bit Service Monitor 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 31
32bit Service Monitor 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 25
32bit Service Monitor 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 13
32bit Service Monitor 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 44
32bit Service Monitor 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 38
32bit Service Monitor 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 57
32bit Service Monitor 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 37
32bit Service Monitor 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 44
32bit Service Monitor s9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 100
32bit Service Monitor s9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 36
32bit Service Monitor v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 100
32bit Service Monitor v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-24 :: 16
32bit Service Monitor v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 33
32bit Service Monitor v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 66
32bit Service Monitor v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 50
32bit Service Monitor v9.95.01 :: 2006-11-12 :: 25
32bit Service Monitor v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 18
32bit Service Monitor v9.97.01 :: 2007-01-20 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.42.22 :: 2002-08-02 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.43.01 :: 2002-08-02 :: 42
32bit Web Browser 9.44.01 :: 2002-08-18 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.44.06 :: 2002-09-17 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.45.01 :: 2002-10-04 :: 100
32bit Web Browser 9.45.11 :: 2002-10-04 :: 40
32bit Web Browser 9.49.01 :: 2003-02-16 :: 25
32bit Web Browser 9.51.01 :: 2003-04-19 :: 41
32bit Web Browser 9.54.01 :: 2003-07-13 :: 12
32bit Web Browser 9.57.23 :: 2003-10-19 :: 33
32bit Web Browser 9.61.01 :: 2004-01-18 :: 0
32bit Web Browser 9.63.01 :: 2004-04-28 :: 33
32bit Web Browser 9.65.14 :: 2004-06-04 :: 100
32bit Web Browser 9.66.01 :: 2004-06-16 :: 100
32bit Web Browser 9.66.19 :: 2004-08-01 :: 25
32bit Web Browser 9.70.01 :: 2005-02-13 :: 20
32Bit Web Browser 9.72.01 :: 2004-12-16 :: 33
32bit Web Browser 9.73.01 :: 2005-01-10 :: 16
32bit Web Browser 9.74.01 :: 2005-02-13
32bit Web Browser 9.75.01 :: 2005-03-08 :: 28
32Bit Web Browser 9.76.01 :: 2005-04-08 :: 37
32bit Web Browser 9.77.01 :: 2005-05-05 :: 23
32bit Web Browser 9.77.19 :: 2005-05-30 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.78.01 :: 2005-06-16 :: 42
32bit Web Browser 9.79.01 :: 2005-07-18 :: 10
32bit Web Browser 9.80.01 :: 2005-08-14 :: 44
32bit Web Browser 9.80.09 :: 2005-08-24 :: 18
32bit Web Browser 9.81.01 :: 2005-09-21 :: 8
32bit Web Browser 9.82.01 :: 2005-10-14 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.83.01 :: 2005-11-14 :: 20
32bit Web Browser 9.84.01 :: 2005-12-12 :: 23
32bit Web Browser 9.85.01 :: 2006-01-10 :: 50
32bit Web Browser 9.86.01 :: 2006-02-21 :: 25
32bit Web Browser 9.98.01 :: 2007-04-11 :: 33
32bit Web Browser v07.09.07 :: 2007-10-04
32bit Web Browser v9.47.14 :: 2003-01-05 :: 50
32bit Web Browser v9.48.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 25
32bit Web Browser v9.87.01 :: 2006-03-17 :: 18
32bit Web Browser v9.88.01 :: 2006-04-23 :: 12
32bit Web Browser v9.89.01 :: 2006-05-19 :: 0
32bit Web Browser v9.90.01 :: 2006-06-26 :: 25
32bit Web Browser v9.91.01 :: 2006-07-16 :: 25
32bit Web Browser v9.92.01 :: 2006-08-13 :: 60
32bit Web Browser v9.93.01 :: 2006-10-03 :: 42
32bit Web Browser v9.94.01 :: 2006-10-25 :: 0
32bit Web Browser v9.95.03 :: 2006-11-27 :: 12
32bit Web Browser v9.96.01 :: 2006-12-20 :: 75
32bit Web Browser w9.38.01 English :: 2001-09-10 :: 16
32bit Web Browser w9.61.x :: 2004-02-02 :: 25
32bit Web Browser w9.69.01 :: 2004-09-17 :: 33
32bit Web Browser w9.75.01 DateCode 03062005 :: 2005-03-20 :: 55
32bit Webbrowser 9.46.01 :: 2002-12-02 :: 58
35.000 Rezepte mit Le Chef :: 2003-04-02 :: 59
355 Monitor 2.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 28
355 Monitor 3.0.0.1 :: 2004-07-16 :: 0
355 Monitor 3.0.2.0 :: 2004-12-16 :: 100
360 Professional Suite :: 2002-07-02 :: 57
386 Max 7.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
386 Max 8.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 57
3A PDF to HTML Batch Converter 2.0 :: 2005-07-17 :: 16
3A PDF to Text Batch Converter 2.0 :: 2005-07-17 :: 9
3A PDF to Word Batch Converter 2.0 :: 2005-07-17 :: 22
3aLab iRadio 1.1.0.152 :: 2004-01-05 :: 36
3C Chess 1.2 :: 2003-02-16 :: 70
3clickBudget 1.1.18.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
3D Browser 5.51 :: 2003-03-03 :: 80
3D Browser v5.51 :: 2003-01-05 :: 0
3D Button generator :: 2004-06-09 :: 0
3D Mark03 Pro :: 2006-07-11 :: 82
3D 4-in-a-Row 5.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 31
3d albam :: 2005-02-20 :: 42
3D Analog Clock :: 2003-09-16 :: 29
3D Animated Wallpaper :: 2002-04-24 :: 42
3d Animated Wallpaper 1.1 :: 2003-02-02 :: 64
3D Animated Wallpaper 3.0 :: 2003-05-18 :: 43
3D Art Screen Saver 5.00 :: 2002-08-02 :: 0
3D Art Screen Saver 5.00 Us :: 2003-05-18 :: 46
3D BattleShip 1.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 34
3D BattleShip 1.01 :: 2003-06-17 :: 44
3D Belote 2 french :: 2003-02-16 :: 39
3D Blocks 2000 :: 2003-11-17 :: 44
3D Blocks 2004 1.04 :: 2004-08-01 :: 0
3D Blocks.2006 v2.63 :: 2006-07-16 :: 66
3D Blocks.2006 v2.71 :: 2006-11-27 :: 0
3D Blocks.2006 v2.72 :: 2007-01-06 :: 50
3D Blocks.2006 v2.73 :: 2007-01-30 :: 8
3D Bloobs 2.09 :: 2002-02-13 :: 68
3D Box Maker Professional 1.1 :: 2005-11-28 :: 8
3D Box Maker Professional 2.0 :: 2006-01-31 :: 60
3D Box Maker Professional v1.1 - 2.0 :: 2006-02-06 :: 42
3D Browser 5.51 :: 2003-03-03 :: 42
3D Browser Pro 6.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 37
3D Browser v5.51 :: 2003-01-05 :: 75
3D Bungalow Aquarium Screensaver 1.0 :: 2006-05-03 :: 75
3D Button Creator Gold 1.0 :: 2003-04-02 :: 31
3D Button Creator Gold 3.02 :: 2004-10-05 :: 49
3D Button Creator Pro 3.01 :: 2003-07-19 :: 76
3D Button Creator s/n: Gold 3.01 :: 2004-05-02 :: 55
3D Button Studio Creator Gold 3.02 :: 2005-02-17 :: 40
3D Calandar :: 2005-10-26 :: 56
3D Calendar 1.0.05 :: 2003-10-02 :: 57
3D Calendar 3.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 37
3D Calendar 32 4.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 75
3D Calender 5.0 :: 2007-09-07 :: 66
3D Canvas Pro 1.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 50
3D Canvas Pro 5.08 :: 2002-02-02 :: 30
3D Canvas Pro 5.5 :: 2002-03-01 :: 20
3D Canvas Pro 5.5b :: 2002-03-19 :: 44
3D Canvas Pro 5.5c :: 2002-03-19 :: 0
3D Canvas Pro 5.5c Revision 5 :: 2002-04-24 :: 25
3D Canvas Pro 5.5c Revision 7 :: 2001-09-10 :: 36
3D Canvas Pro 5.6 :: 2002-05-15 :: 35
3D Canvas Pro 5.7a :: 2002-08-18 :: 36
3D Canvas Pro 6.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 20
3D Canvas Pro 6.0 R3 :: 2003-03-17 :: 28
3D Canvas Pro 6.0 R4 :: 2003-05-18 :: 22
3D Canvas Pro 6.0.1 :: 2003-10-19 :: 9
3D Canvas Pro 6.0.1.2 :: 2003-10-02 :: 17
3D Canvas Pro 6.01 :: 2004-06-04 :: 20
3D Canvas Pro v6.01 :: 2003-07-19 :: 16
3D Canyon Flight Screensaver :: 2006-12-29 :: 70
3D Checkers 1.6 :: 2005-08-23 :: 58
3D Christmas Tree Screensaver 1.06 :: 2004-01-05 :: 41
3D Christmas Tree Screensaver v1.01 :: 2003-01-05 :: 21
3D Combine 2.6.7 :: 2002-01-23 :: 50
3D Combine 2.6.9 :: 2002-04-24 :: 40
3D Combine 2.7 :: 2001-09-10 :: 33
3D Combine 2.8 :: 2002-07-15 :: 0
3D Combine 2.8.2 :: 2002-10-04 :: 0
3D Combine 2.9 :: 2003-02-16 :: 36
3D Combine 2.9.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 9
3D Combine 3.2 :: 2003-12-15 :: 45
3D Combine 3.20 :: 2004-01-18 :: 36
3D Combine 3.4.0 :: 2004-08-01 :: 33
3D Combine 4.0.5 :: 2005-03-18 :: 39
3D Combine v3.20 :: 2004-06-04 :: 42
3D Crazy Clock v2.2 Screensaver :: 2006-05-26 :: 53
3D Custom ScreenSaver 1.0.276 :: 2004-07-07 :: 40
3D Custom Screensaver 3.73 :: 2002-01-23 :: 31
3D Custom Screensaver V3.80 V3.80 From ZDNET :: 2002-04-09 :: 34
3D Designer 9.014 :: 2004-12-16 :: 57
3D Designer German 9.014 :: 2004-12-16 :: 62
3D Desktop Destroyer 1.6 :: 2004-02-02 :: 33
3D Developer Studio 6.0 :: 2005-03-23 :: 78
3D Domino v1.6 :: 2006-02-06 :: 62
3D Dominos 1.4 :: 2002-04-24 :: 57
3d driving school :: 2005-10-24 :: 65
3D Driving-School 3D Simulator :: 2004-11-19 :: 65
3D Earth v2.1 Screensaver (by AOload) :: 2006-05-26 :: 17
3D Fahrschule 5 :: 2007-01-12 :: 55
3d Field 1.9.6.0 :: 2002-02-02 :: 33
3d Field 1.97 :: 2002-01-23 :: 40
3d Field 1.98 :: 2002-02-02 :: 62
3d Field 1.99 :: 2002-02-02 :: 75
3d Field 2.01 :: 2002-03-19 :: 50
3d Field 2.03 :: 2002-08-02 :: 40
3D Fish School 2.21 :: 2004-01-18 :: 65
3D Fish School 2.22 :: 2004-01-18 :: 68
3D Fish School Screensaver :: 2005-03-05 :: 54
3D Fish School Screensaver 1.6 :: 2003-06-17 :: 53
3D Fish School Screensaver 3.92 :: 2007-08-20 :: 30
3D FISH! 2.65e :: 2002-01-23 :: 57
3D FISH! 2.70e :: 2002-01-23 :: 68
3D Formula 1 Screensaver v1.0 :: 2005-05-21 :: 83
3D Foto Studio 1.2 :: 2004-02-02 :: 36
3D Four in a Row 5.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 30
3D FTP 4.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 80
3D FTP 5.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 83
3D FTP 6,01 :: 2003-09-16 :: 39
3D FTP 6.01 :: 2005-03-01 :: 22
3D FTP v7.01 :: 2005-12-01 :: 71
3D Galaxy Journey Screensaver v1.1 :: 2005-04-14 :: 13
3D Geometrical Objects :: 2006-01-10 :: 33
3D Geometrical Objects 01. Apr :: 2004-12-16 :: 50
3D Geometrical Objects 1,3 :: 2003-09-16 :: 22
3D Geometrical Objects v1.4 :: 2004-11-18 :: 55
3D GoldRush :: 2002-08-18 :: 35
3D Grandfather Clock Screensaver v1.0 :: 2005-09-12 :: 74
3D Graph Generator 1.0.0 :: 2004-04-02 :: 66
3D Ground Zero :: 2003-06-01 :: 54
3D Hard Core :: 2003-06-01 :: 60
3D Headings 2.0.140 :: 2003-10-02 :: 68
3D Invigorator Pro (for Adobe After Effects) 3.08 :: 2004-04-28 :: 44
3D Lines And Blocks 1.0 :: 2003-11-03 :: 58
3D Mail Effects 5.5.0 :: 2002-06-04 :: 37
3D Maker 1.1.0 :: 2003-06-01 :: 43
3D Maker 2.0.0 :: 2003-12-02 :: 31
3D Maker 2.1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 16
3D Maker for Photoshop 1.2 :: 2003-12-02 :: 52
3D mark 03 :: 2007-05-22 :: 91
3D Mark 03 PRO 3.1.3 :: 2003-04-20 :: 53
3D Mark 06 v1.0.2 :: 2006-04-03 :: 13
3D Mark 2001 :: 2004-06-01 :: 85
3D Mark 2001 built 200 :: 2004-11-03 :: 76
3D MARK 2001 SE :: 2002-10-11 :: 93
3D Mark 2005 :: 2004-12-03 :: 88
3D Mark 2006 :: 2006-01-23 :: 65
3d Mark 2006 Basic Edition 1.0.2 :: 2006-01-23 :: 94
3d mark Pro :: 2003-01-05 :: 14
3D Mark v1.00 :: 2006-12-18 :: 25
3D Mark03 Build 340 :: 2004-05-05 :: 92
3D Master 1.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 33
3D Matrix screensaver : Inside The Matrix 1.2 :: 2004-09-01 :: 30
3D Matrix Screensaver Inside the Matrix 1.3 :: 2005-02-22 :: 58
3D Matrix ScreenSaver: Inside the Matrix :: 2004-06-04 :: 59
3D Matrix ScreenSaver: Inside the Matrix 1.3 :: 2005-02-22 :: 25
3D Matrix ScreenSaver: The Endless Corridors :: 2005-11-16 :: 67
3D Max 5 :: 2004-02-05 :: 58
3d max 6 :: 2005-05-14 :: 31
3d max 6.0 :: 2004-12-04 :: 34
3d max8 :: 2007-09-30 :: 27
3D Maze Cube 1.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 50
3D Menu Pack Multi Site Edition 1.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 66
3D Miracle 1.60 :: 2003-02-16 :: 0
3D Miracle 1.71 :: 2003-07-19 :: 40
3D Miracle 1.72 :: 2003-09-02 :: 14
3D Miracle 1.73 :: 2004-06-16 :: 71
3D Miracle And 3D Monster Toolkit 4.9 :: 2004-06-16 :: 80
3D Miracle x.xx-1.72 :: 2004-01-05 :: 33
3D Monster 1.51 :: 2003-02-16 :: 50
3D Monster 1.53 :: 2003-07-19 :: 33
3D Monster 1.54 :: 2004-06-16 :: 71
3D Morris 1.4 :: 2002-02-13 :: 54
3D Morris Retail 1.56 :: 2004-06-04 :: 79
3D MP3 Sound Recorder 3.8.12 :: 2005-10-04 :: 41
3D MP3 Sound Recorder 3.8.13 :: 2005-10-31 :: 66
3D Nature :: 2002-10-17 :: 16
3D Night Scenes Screensaver 1.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 30
3D Night Viper :: 2003-09-16 :: 35
3D Night Viper ScreenSaver 1.01 :: 2004-07-16 :: 25
3D Nomaad 1.5 :: 2004-02-02 :: 50
3D Object Converter 1.40 :: 2003-02-16 :: 16
3d object converter 2.0 :: 2003-04-06 :: 45
3d Object Converter 4.0 :: 2007-08-20 :: 65
3D Outer Space Screensaver 1.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 33
3D Photo Browser 8.2 :: 2005-08-24 :: 50
3D Photo Browser 8.5 :: 2006-03-07 :: 60
3D Photo Browser v8.51 Multilingual :: 2006-05-02 :: 75
3D Photo Builder 1.1 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
3D Photo Builder 1.2 :: 2003-12-02 :: 66
3D PhotoStudio 1.1 :: 2002-08-02 :: 87
3D PhotoStudio 1.2 :: 2001-09-10 :: 41
3D PhotoStudio v1.2 Win9xNT :: 2006-07-11 :: 33
3D Pim 1.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
3D PINS 1.2 :: 2002-02-02
3D Producer 1.1 :: 2003-12-15 :: 35
3D Puzzle Cube 1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 16
3D Rad 1.5.3 :: 2005-03-01
3D Rad 2.5.4 :: 2005-03-01 :: 54
3D RainDrop Screensaver 2.0 :: 2003-10-19 :: 51
3D Rijschool SP3 :: 2005-01-04 :: 31
3D RPG Editor :: 2004-08-11 :: 33
3D Sapper 1.1 :: 2003-01-18 :: 62
3D Schach 5.0 :: 2006-04-17 :: 25
3D Sea Aquarium Screensaver v1___ :: 2005-04-15 :: 32
3D Seahorses 1.2 :: 2003-07-31 :: 25
3d sex villa :: 2007-06-23 :: 30
3D Sexvilla :: 2007-05-16 :: 16
3D Sharks Aquarium Screensaver :: 2006-12-22 :: 36
3D Slip Sliding X-Mas Penguins Screensaver 1.2 :: 2003-10-19 :: 27
3D Software Object Modeller Pro :: 2007-10-27 :: 75
3D Soma Puzzle 2.2 :: 2002-04-24 :: 33
3D Spades Deluxe 3.3 :: 2004-11-19 :: 42
3D Star Wars Screensaver 1.3 :: 2007-07-06 :: 16
3d studio max :: 2005-12-27 :: 45
3D Studio Max 2.0 :: 2002-08-18 :: 55
3D Studio MAX 4.0 , 5.0 :: 2003-05-10 :: 46
3D Studio Max 4.2 :: 2003-09-02 :: 31
3d Studio Max 5 :: 2007-01-30 :: 41
3d studio max 5 italian :: 2003-06-05 :: 37
3d studio max 5.0 :: 2004-11-03 :: 35
3d studio max 6 :: 2004-10-01 :: 26
3D Studio Max 6 (Spanish) :: 2004-10-04 :: 37
3D studio MAX 6.0 :: 2004-07-30 :: 41
3D Studio Max 7 :: 2005-10-10 :: 30
3D Studio Max 7 trial :: 2006-04-23 :: 49
3D Studio MAX 7 Trial 100% working+activation :: 2007-08-20 :: 18
3d Studio Max 8 full activation :: 2006-02-10 :: 30
3D Studio Max hmm? :: 2004-10-10 :: 17
3D Studio Max R2.5 :: 2007-05-29 :: 25
3D Studio Max v3.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 88
3D Studio Max V4.0 :: 2002-07-22 :: 39
3D StudioMAX R 2.5 :: 2007-05-29 :: 37
3D Studiomax V.6.0 :: 2007-02-26 :: 33
3D Supernova Screensaver 1.1 :: 2005-11-28 :: 78
3D Texture Painter v1.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 80
3D Tiger Tank v2.1 Screensaver :: 2006-05-26 :: 38
3D Titanic Screensaver v1.0 :: 2007-09-26 :: 80
3D Tower Clock Screensaver v1.1 :: 2005-07-17 :: 6
3D Ultra Pinball 1.01 :: 2002-03-19 :: 52
3D Ultra Pinball Real Games :: 2002-04-01 :: 75
3D Ultra Pinball Thrill Ride :: 2002-09-17 :: 80
3D UZ 3.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 53
3D Valentine Hearts Screensaver 1.1 :: 2005-03-07 :: 23
3D View (null) :: 2002-01-23 :: 55
3D Waterfall Screensaver v1.0 :: 2005-08-24 :: 76
3d webmaster 3dstate :: 2007-03-25 :: 69
3D Website Builder 10 :: 2002-01-23 :: 45
3D world map :: 2006-07-20 :: 47
3D World Map (4692-5) :: 2004-10-13 :: 69
3D World Map 1.20 :: 2003-10-17 :: 53
3D World Map 2.0 :: 2005-01-03 :: 74
3D World Map 2.1 :: 2005-02-22 :: 69
3d world map v.2 :: 2004-10-19 :: 60
3D Yams XP 2 french :: 2003-02-16 :: 62
3D Yams XP French :: 2003-07-19 :: 44
3D-ALBUM Commercial Suite v3.28.0 RETAIL-Lz0 :: 2006-07-31 :: 73
3D-Fahrschule 4.5 Europa-Edition :: 2006-09-19 :: 42
3D-FTP 4.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 33
3D-FTP 6.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 27
3D-FTP 6.01 :: 2005-01-23 :: 49
3D-FTP 7.01 :: 2004-11-04 :: 80
3D-FTP v4.02 :: 2006-07-11 :: 66
3D-FTP v6.0 :: 2003-10-30 :: 28
3D-SHAPE 3DViewer v1.50 :: 2007-09-26
3D-SHAPE 3DViewer v1.52 :: 2007-11-24
3dAliens Glu3D v1.3.08 for 3dsmax 7 :: 2005-01-11 :: 25
3dDom 2.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 100
3deep space all :: 2005-04-19 :: 21
3DEM 15.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 75
3DEM 8.0.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 50
3DField 1.75 :: 2002-08-02 :: 16
3DField 1.86 :: 2002-08-02 :: 66
3DField 1.99 :: 2002-02-02
3DField 2.00 :: 2002-02-13 :: 37
3Dfm 1.0 :: 2002-06-04 :: 0
3DFX Video Renderer 1.2 :: 2002-03-01 :: 25
3DJongg 2.5 :: 2003-03-03 :: 16
3DJongg v2.5 :: 2003-01-05 :: 17
3DMaker 3.2.1 :: 2004-12-02 :: 50
3DMark 03 3.6.0.0 :: 2007-03-21 :: 54
3dMark 03 Pro v3.1.3 :: 2004-04-19 :: 92
3DMARK 06 :: 2006-01-23 :: 96
3DMark 2000 1.1.Pro Build 340 :: 2002-02-13 :: 38
3DMark 2000 v1.1.Pro Build 340 :: 2004-06-01 :: 67
3DMark 2001 :: 2003-02-16 :: 88
3DMARK 2001 PRO SE build 340 :: 2004-06-01 :: 95
3DMark 2003 :: 2003-09-16 :: 63
3DMARK 2003 (1st Release) :: 2003-02-12 :: 49
3dMark 2003 build 330 :: 2003-10-24 :: 93
3DMark 2003 Pro :: 2004-07-11 :: 43
3DMark 2003 Profesional Edition :: 2003-06-03 :: 52
3dmark 2005 :: 2004-09-30 :: 67
3DMark 2006 Professional 1.0.2 :: 2006-01-23 :: 91
3DMark 99 Max Pro - Build 200 99 Max Pro build 200 :: 2005-04-06 :: 64
3DMark Pro 03 :: 2003-05-11 :: 50
3DMark-2005 :: 2005-01-25 :: 90
3DMark03 320 :: 2003-07-21 :: 64
3dMark03 Pro v3.1.3 :: 2004-04-19 :: 94
3DMark05 1.0 :: 2004-10-10 :: 91
3DMark05 1.1.0 :: 2004-12-02 :: 86
3DMark05 Pro 1.3.0 :: 2007-06-21 :: 91
3DMark05 Pro v1.0 :: 2007-01-20 :: 85
3DMark05 Pro [by Pitulon] 1.2.0 :: 2005-03-17 :: 76
3DMark2001 :: 2004-06-15 :: 78
3DMark2001 SE Pro 1.0 :: 2002-02-13 :: 94
3DMark2005 :: 2004-12-09 :: 81
3dmax 6 :: 2004-05-06 :: 43
3dmax7 :: 2005-02-05 :: 37
3DMeNow 1.5 :: 2003-01-18 :: 48
3DMeNow 1.5.111 :: 2002-02-02 :: 59
3DMiracle 1.40 :: 2002-04-24 :: 20
3DMiracle 1.60 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
3DMiracle 1.70 :: 2003-02-16 :: 75
3DMiracle 1.72 :: 2003-09-02 :: 50
3DMobiles ScreenSaver 1.0 :: 2002-10-04 :: 60
3DMonster 1.51 :: 2002-10-17 :: 50
3DMonster 1.53 :: 2003-09-02 :: 80
3DNA Desktop 1.0 :: 2003-02-16 :: 29
3DNA Desktop 1.0.1 :: 2003-03-17 :: 32
3DNA Desktop v1.0 :: 2003-01-07 :: 16
3DNA Loft Package 1.0.0 :: 2003-07-13 :: 11
3DProducer v2.2.1 :: 2006-07-03 :: 60
3DRT Ping Pong :: 2005-10-31 :: 45
3ds max 4 :: 2004-04-06 :: 26
3ds max 4.2 :: 2002-07-29 :: 40
3DS mAX 5.0 :: 2003-03-31 :: 32
3ds max 5.1 :: 2005-03-17 :: 42
3ds max 6 :: 2005-02-25 :: 44
3Ds Max 6.0 :: 2004-08-13 :: 51
3ds max 7 :: 2006-01-23 :: 32
3DS MAX 7.0 7.0 :: 2004-12-16 :: 34
3ds max 8 :: 2007-03-18 :: 32
3ds max 9 :: 2007-11-05 :: 0
3ds max 9 serial :: 2007-05-15 :: 15
3ds max4 :: 2004-07-13 :: 46
3DSexVilla :: 2006-04-28 :: 32
3dsmax :: 2005-10-31 :: 35
3dsmax 4 :: 2002-12-12 :: 39
3dsmax 5.1 :: 2003-06-17 :: 45
3dsmax plugin polyboost 3.0 :: 2007-10-13 :: 18
3dsmax6 :: 2005-06-08 :: 55
3dsmax7 :: 2005-09-09 :: 50
3DSpins 1.3 :: 2002-02-13 :: 28
3DState Developer Studio 6.0 :: 2006-09-13 :: 24
3dstudiomax 4 :: 2003-08-03 :: 35
3DSwapBalls 1.3 :: 2002-02-13 :: 50
3Dt 1.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 33
3DVista Batch 1.1 :: 2005-03-29 :: 35
3DVista Flash VT Exporter 3.6 :: 2005-03-29 :: 39
3DVista Publisher Pro 2.6 :: 2005-03-29 :: 27
3DVista Real Estate 1.0 :: 2005-03-29 :: 21
3DVista Show 1.6 :: 2005-03-29 :: 25
3DVista Skin Editor 2.3 :: 2005-03-29 :: 33
3DVista Skin Editor 3.0 :: 2005-07-18 :: 23
3DVista Stitcher 2.5 :: 2005-03-29 :: 21
3DVista Stitcher 3.0 :: 2005-05-03 :: 24
3dVista Studio 1.9 :: 2002-10-17 :: 28
3DWebButton 1.5 :: 2002-08-02 :: 35
3gp converter :: 2006-05-09 :: 37
3GP Movie Studio v1.0.1.109 :: 2006-12-20 :: 72
3GP To AVI Converter Splitter 1.0 :: 2007-09-26 :: 50
3GP to GIF JPEG Converter 1.0 :: 2005-11-07 :: 53
3gp video :: 2007-10-12 :: 33
3gp video converter :: 2007-02-05 :: 30
3GP Video Converter 3.1.5.0512b :: 2006-06-03 :: 43
3GP-Converter :: 2007-06-03 :: 31
3gp-video-converter :: 2007-02-22 :: 41
3gpConvert 2.0 :: 2006-04-19 :: 61
3gpConvert 2.5 :: 2006-01-05 :: 51
3gpConvert 3.0 :: 2007-01-11 :: 51
3IAB Three In A Bed 3.0 :: 2003-05-11 :: 23
3MBTech DVD Jaguar 2.4.1.0.21 :: 2005-03-01 :: 60
3nity CD DVD Burner v1.7 :: 2007-09-26 :: 40
3Planesoft Voyage of Columbus.3D Screensaver v1.0 :: 2006-06-04 :: 57
3Planetsoft Mayan Waterfall 3D Screensaver 1.0 :: 2007-10-04 :: 37
3rd Degree Burn 2003 1.1.2111 :: 2003-01-18 :: 57
3rd Degree Burn 2003 v1.1.2102 :: 2003-01-05 :: 50
3rd PlanIt 7.03 :: 2002-08-02 :: 30
3rd PlanIt 7.05.29 :: 2003-09-02 :: 54
3rd PlanIt 7.08.016 :: 2004-01-05 :: 66
3rd PlanIt 7.10.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 22
3rd PlanIt 7.10.06 :: 2004-03-15 :: 66
3rd PlanIt v6.03.001 :: 2006-07-11 :: 80
3rd PlanIt v8.00.077.1032 :: 2007-09-26 :: 33
3rd PlanIt v8.00.082.1065 :: 2007-10-04 :: 75
3rd PlanIt v8.01.002 :: 2007-11-24
3rd PlanIt v8.01.006 :: 2007-11-24
3six5 3.1 :: 2002-02-02 :: 45
3six5 Personal Pictures 1.0 :: 2002-02-02 :: 42
3S_Accounting_v4.0 :: 2007-09-26
3wGet 1.0.80 Beta :: 2003-11-04 :: 52
3wGet 1.2 :: 2003-10-19 :: 63
4 Corners 4.2 :: 2003-02-02 :: 60
4 Dos 5.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4 Home Edition :: 2004-06-19 :: 40
4 in 1 row :: 2002-08-02 :: 25
4 In a Row 1.1 :: 2005-03-01
4 In a Row 2.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
4 In A Row v1.1 :: 2003-01-05 :: 55
4 Kingdoms 1.0 :: 2003-11-03 :: 45
4 Screens 2.15 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
4-Net 1.1 :: 2005-03-01 :: 38
4-Net 2.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4.0 Student 5.00 :: 2002-10-17 :: 34
40.000 Wahammer Dawn of War :: 2006-12-12 :: 63
41437f33ac0bcbb67482ac7c38c360f7c926a.txt :: 2007-11-24
4C 1.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 18
4ComTech Recipe Browser 1.1 :: 2005-03-18 :: 47
4Corners Solitaire 4.1 :: 2002-07-02 :: 23
4Dev Support Fetch Dog 1.0 :: 2003-09-02 :: 36
4Disk Clean Gold 4.50 :: 2004-03-01 :: 35
4DiskClean Gold 3.0 :: 2002-01-23 :: 13
4DiskClean Gold 4.5 :: 2004-03-01 :: 13
4DiskClean Gold 4.5.120804 :: 2004-12-16 :: 13
4DiskClean Gold 5.0.122104 :: 2004-12-27 :: 16
4DiskClean Gold 5.0.122804 :: 2005-02-13 :: 16
4DiskClean Gold v2.5 :: 2006-07-11 :: 30
4DiskClean Lite 2.0 :: 2001-09-10 :: 9
4HTML Assistant 1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 33
4Level eZeeScroller 1.0 :: 2004-02-16 :: 33
4S Lock v1.07 :: 2006-07-24 :: 66
4Screens 3.19 :: 2003-03-17 :: 66
4slideshow 1.0.0.1 :: 2004-02-02 :: 68
4T DVD and 4T CD :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
4T nox :: 2005-03-01 :: 100
4T Nvntory :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4T Pet :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
4T Publication :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
4th Right :: 2005-03-01 :: 50
4TOPS Compare Excel Files 1.0 :: 2005-08-12 :: 40
4TOPS Compare Excel Files v1.0 :: 2006-05-11 :: 18
4TOPS Compare Excel Files v1.1 :: 2006-05-29 :: 21
4U AVI MPEG Converter 1.2.8 :: 2004-12-16 :: 11
4U AVI MPEG Converter 1.3.8 :: 2005-01-10 :: 16
4U AVI MPEG Converter 2.0.5 :: 2005-02-13 :: 33
4U AVI MPEG Converter 2.1.8 :: 2005-03-07 :: 37
4U AVI MPEG Converter 2.3.8 :: 2005-03-08 :: 42
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.0.2 :: 2005-06-16 :: 15
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.1.0 :: 2005-08-22 :: 37
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.2.0 :: 2005-10-04 :: 26
4U AVI MPEG Converter 3.3.0 :: 2006-03-05 :: 58
4U AVI MPEG Converter v3.6.2 :: 2006-04-07 :: 15
4U AVI MPEG Converter v3.8.0 :: 2006-05-02 :: 55
4U AVI MPEG Converter v3.9.2 :: 2006-08-25 :: 52
4U AVI MPEG Converter v5.0.3 :: 2006-11-27 :: 51
4U AVI MPEG Converter v5.2.6 :: 2006-12-15 :: 74
4U DVD Ripper v2.0.2 :: 2006-07-31 :: 20
4U DVD Ripper v2.0.2.8 :: 2006-07-31 :: 58
4U DVD Ripper v2.2.0.3 :: 2006-08-25 :: 72
4U MP4 Converter V.2.1.2 :: 2007-08-25 :: 33
4U MP4 Video Converter v1.2.0 :: 2006-11-06 :: 31
4U MP4 Video Converter v1.6.6 :: 2006-11-27 :: 50
4U MP4 Video Converter v1.8.2 :: 2006-12-20 :: 74
4U MP4 Video Converter v2.1.2 :: 2007-06-09 :: 10
4U MP4.Video Converter v2.1.8 :: 2007-09-26 :: 62
4U MP4.Video Converter v2.2.6 :: 2007-10-04 :: 72
4U Wma mp3 converter :: 2007-11-05 :: 55
4U WMA MP3 Converter 2.2.1 :: 2003-08-17 :: 32
4U WMA MP3 Converter 2.2.3 :: 2003-11-17 :: 26
4U WMA MP3 Converter 2.3.8 :: 2003-12-03 :: 43
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.0.8 :: 2004-01-15 :: 55
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.1.0 :: 2004-02-02 :: 58
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.1.5 :: 2004-07-26 :: 25
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.6.2 :: 2004-11-03 :: 60
4U WMA MP3 Converter 3.8.6 :: 2005-01-31 :: 40
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.0.2 :: 2005-02-13 :: 46
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.0.3 :: 2005-03-07 :: 35
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.0.8 :: 2005-08-12 :: 46
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.1.0 :: 2005-09-26 :: 23
4u wma mp3 converter 5.10 :: 2005-10-23 :: 6
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.3 :: 2006-05-18 :: 14
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.9.2 :: 2007-03-18 :: 20
4U WMA MP3 Converter 5.9.3 :: 2007-05-15 :: 17
4U WMA MP3 Converter v3.1.5 :: 2004-12-04 :: 13
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.1.0 :: 2006-02-06 :: 40
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.1.1 Keymaker :: 2006-03-23 :: 31
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.3.0 Keymaker :: 2006-05-02 :: 52
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.6.0 :: 2006-11-27 :: 9
4U WMA MP3 Converter v5.6.0-DVT :: 2006-10-25 :: 26
4U WMA MP3 Converter(Version 5.6.0) :: 2007-01-12 :: 63
4U WMA-MP3 Converter 5.0.8 :: 2005-09-15 :: 12
4UMP4VideoConverter :: 2007-04-09 :: 20
5 Card Dash :: 2003-10-28 :: 28
5 clicks 4.0.1 :: 2003-09-16 :: 9
5 Clicks Screen Capture 4.2 :: 2004-04-02 :: 13
5 Dices 1.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 100
5 Or More 2.0a :: 2005-03-01 :: 40
5 Star Zip 1.0 :: 2002-04-24 :: 50
5 StarZIP 2001 v1.0 :: 2006-07-11 :: 0
533Soft Box Shot Maker :: 2005-12-12 :: 47
533Soft Exe Wrapper 2.1 :: 2005-10-31 :: 35
533Soft Exe Wrapper 2.36c :: 2006-01-05 :: 70
533Soft Exe Wrapper 2.3c :: 2005-11-21 :: 62
533Soft Exe Wrapper v2.4c :: 2006-05-19 :: 45
533Soft Icon Changer 1.80 :: 2006-03-05 :: 36
54hdd v0.6a6 :: 2004-10-04 :: 33
59+ Log Lite 1.4.0 :: 2004-06-16 :: 57
5Account R2.4 :: 2002-01-23 :: 60
5MCC 2006 :: 2006-07-31 :: 9
5mHerbal 6.0.177 :: 2004-09-17 :: 20
5mID 4.0.176 :: 2004-09-17 :: 40
5mOrtho 4.0.178 :: 2004-09-17 :: 10
5star Audio Studio 1.0.0.0 :: 2006-03-07 :: 29
5star Game Copy 1.0.5.118 :: 2006-03-07 :: 87
5star Game Copy 1.0.5.124 :: 2006-04-26 :: 89
5star mobile video :: 2006-02-26 :: 26
5star Mobile Video 1.5.1.1222 :: 2006-03-07 :: 85
5StarZip 2001 1.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 37
5Talk 1.01 :: 2002-01-23 :: 50
5Time 3.2 :: 2002-01-23 :: 100
5Xpence 3.9 :: 2002-01-23 :: 100
602 Internet Server 3.32c :: 2004-02-02 :: 50
602 Lan suite 2004 :: 2004-07-16 :: 46
602 Messaging Server 3.32c :: 2004-02-02 :: 14
602 SOFTWARE :: 2004-12-17 :: 30
602LAN SUITE 2004 :: 2004-07-11 :: 51
602PC SUITE :: 2005-07-17 :: 21
602pc suite 4.1 (2004) :: 2004-11-08 :: 27
602PC Suite 4.2.06.0213 :: 2006-03-05 :: 31
602Print Pack 3.0 :: 2003-12-15 :: 15
602Print Pack 4.1.04.1027 :: 2005-02-17 :: 6
602Print Pack 4.1.05.0223 :: 2005-03-07 :: 34
602Print Pack 5.0.05.0805 :: 2005-08-22 :: 25
602Print Pack v5.0.06.0426 :: 2006-05-11 :: 39
602Pro PC SUITE :: 2004-08-27 :: 20
602Pro PC Suite 2001 :: 2001-09-10 :: 57
602Pro Print Pack 4.1.05.0322 :: 2005-05-30 :: 35
640 VLK key for Windows XP pro :: 2005-04-19 :: 52
64hdd v0.7a0 :: 2004-10-04 :: 50
64hdd v0.6a7 :: 2004-10-04 :: 50
64hdd v0.7a1 :: 2004-10-04 :: 77
64hdd v0.7a3 :: 2004-10-04 :: 42
64hdd v0.7a5 :: 2004-10-04 :: 50
68000 Integrated Development Environment 2.00 :: 2005-09-26 :: 53
7 dicnnaires utiles :: 2004-08-30 :: 28
7 Download Services 3.2.4 :: 2005-02-13 :: 59
7 Download Services 3.2.5 :: 2005-03-07 :: 50
7 File Boss 1.0 :: 2006-02-13 :: 6
7 iPod Helper 1.0.1 :: 2006-02-13 :: 55
7 Sins :: 2005-05-24 :: 17
7 View Slide Show 1.0 :: 2002-08-02 :: 60
7 View Slide Show 2.0.0 :: 2003-08-17 :: 50
72(t) Distribution Software 5.00 :: 2005-02-22
767 PILOT COMMAND :: 2003-01-18 :: 35
767 Pilot in Command :: 2004-06-01 :: 41
7D Swapper 1.4 :: 2002-07-15 :: 60
7View Slide Show 1.0.0 :: 2002-06-04 :: 100
8 Away :: 2005-03-01 :: 0
8085 Simulator IDE v1.80 :: 2003-12-19 :: 42
88 Edit v1.05 :: 2006-07-05 :: 12
8848Soft Convert Doc to PDF for Word v3.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 25
8848Soft Convert Doc to PDF for Word v3.50 :: 2007-06-13 :: 16
8848Soft Convert PPT to PDF for PowerPoint v3.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 23
8848Soft Convert XLS to PDF for Excel v3.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 30
8848Soft PDF Decrypter v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 10
8848Soft PDF Decrypter v2.50-ARN :: 2006-11-06 :: 8
8848Soft PDF Encrypter v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 25
8848Soft PDF Encrypter v2.50-ARN :: 2006-11-06 :: 20
8848Soft PDF Merger v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 4
8848Soft PDF Splitter v2.0 :: 2006-10-18 :: 18
8848Soft_Convert_Doc_to_PDF_for_Word_v3.50-DIGERATI :: 2006-11-12 :: 13
8Mile :: 2003-04-23 :: 50
8Signs Firewall 2.2a :: 2004-02-16 :: 84
8Signs Firewall 2.30 :: 2006-01-31 :: 67
8signs Firewall Remote Administration Tool 2.25 :: 2004-12-16 :: 47
8Signs Firewall Remote Administration Tool 2.30 :: 2006-01-31 :: 45
99 Bottles 1.0 :: 2002-10-17 :: 20
9Tuner 5.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 25
@Air 3.0 :: 2005-03-01 :: 66
@Risk 4.0 :: 2005-12-04 :: 24
@Spider 1.0.2 :: 2004-07-07 :: 71
@Spider 1.2.5 :: 2001-09-10 :: 75
@Spider 1.24 :: 2002-06-04 :: 50
@Spider 1.25 :: 2002-07-15 :: 50

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Takeuchi TB175 Operator's Manual

TB175

Hydraulic Excavator
OPERATOR’S MANUAL

Serial No. 17512105~


Book No. AL3E016

OPERA TOR’S MANUAL

WARNING
Read and understand these instructions.
Failure to do so can cause injury or death.

E
Downloaded from www.dlmanuals.com
SAFETY ALERT SYMBOL
This symbol means Attention! Be Alert! Your Safety Is Involved.
The message that follows the symbol contains important information
about safety.
Read and understand the message to avoid personal injury or death.

■ It is the owner or employer’s responsibility to fully instruct each operator in the


proper and safe operation of all equipment. All persons using this machine should
thoroughly familiarize themselves with the following sections.

■ All operators must be instructed on the proper functions of the excavator before
running the machine.

■ Learn and practice correct use of the machine controls in a safe, clear area before
operating this machine on a job site.

CAUTION

Improper operation, inspection and maintenance of this


machine can cause injury or death.
Read and understand this manual before performing any
operation, inspection or maintenance on this machine.

■ Always store this manual near at hand preferably on the machine itself. If it should be lost
or damaged, immediately order a new one from your Takeuchi dealer.
When transferring ownership of this machine, be sure to provide this manual to the next
owner.

■ Takeuchi supplies machines complying to the local regulations and standards of the country
of export. If your machine has been purchased in another country or from a person or
company of another country, it may not have the safety devices or safety standards required
for use in your country. Should you have any question about whether your machine complies
with the regulations and standards of your country, contact a Takeuchi dealer.

■ Please note that the contents and diagrams included in this manual may not match your
machine exactly.

Downloaded from www.dlmanuals.com


CALIFORNIA
Proposition 65 Warning
Diesel engine exhaust and some of its constituents are
known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth
defects, and other reproductive harm.
Battery posts, terminals and related accessories contain lead
and lead compounds, chemicals known to the State of
California to cause cancer and birth defects or other
reproductive harm. Wash hands after handling battery.

Downloaded from www.dlmanuals.com


It is your responsibility to observe all pertinent laws and regulations and to follow the
manufacturer’s instructions on machine operation, inspection and maintenance.

Virtually all accidents occur as the result of a failure to observe basic safety rules and
precautions. An accident can often be avoided by recognizing potentially hazardous situations
beforehand. Read and understand all of the safety messages which explain how to prevent
these accidents from occurring. Do not operate the machine until you are sure that you have
gained a proper understanding of its operation, inspection and maintenance.

■ SlGNAL WORDS
Safety messages appearing in this manual and on machine decals are identified by the
words “DANGER”, “WARNING” and “CAUTION”. These signal words mean the following:

DANGER WARNING CAUTION


The word “DANGER” The word “WARNING” The word “CAUTlON”
indicates an imminently indicates a potentially indicates a potentially
hazardous situation hazardous situation hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, which, if not avoided, which, if not avoided,
can result in serious could result in serious may result in minor or
injury or death. injury or death. moderate injury.

IMPORTANT: The word “IMPORTANT” is used to alert against operators and


maintenance personnel about situations which can result in possible damage to the
machine and its components.

It is impossible to foresee every possible circumstance that might involve a potential hazard.
The warnings in this manual or on the machine can not cover all possible contingencies. You
must exercise all due care and follow normal safety procedures when operating the machine
so as to ensure that no damage occurs to the machine, its operators or other persons.

■ EXPLANATION OF GRAPHICAL SYMBOLS


Following is an explanation of symbols used in this manual.
, X ......... prohibition
/ ....... Lock

/ ...... Unlock

1
Downloaded from www.dlmanuals.com
INTRODUCTION

Foreword
This manual describes operation, inspection
and maintenance of the machine, as well as
safety instructions to be heeded during these
operations.
If you have any questions about the machine,
please contact a Takeuchi sales or service
outlet.

■ Manual storage compartment ■ Serial numbers


A compartment for storing this manual is Check the serial numbers of the machine and
provided at the position shown on the the engine and write them in the spaces
diagram below. provided below.

Machine number :

L3A001

1. Open the cover behind the seat. N0A002


2. After using the manual, place it in the
plastic pouch and store it back in the
manual storage compartment. Engine number :

2
Downloaded from www.dlmanuals.com
MACHINE DESCRIPTlON

■ Front, rear, Ieft and right


FRONT
This manual refers the front, rear, left and
right of the machine as seen when sitting in
the operator’s seat with the dozer blade
Dozer blade
visible to the front.

■ Designated operations
Use this machine primarily for the following LEFT RIGHT
operations:
¡ Excavating
¡ Digging ditches
¡ Digging side ditches
¡ Leveling
¡ Loading REAR
E3A020

■ Features
¡ Automatic travel shift-down system.
¡ Isolation mounted cab minimizes vibration.
¡ Short pitch rubber crawler.
¡ Low engine noise and exhaust emissions.
¡ Electro over hydraulic control of auxiliary hydraulic circuit.
¡ One touch engine deceleration button.
¡ Two-speed slew allows the operator to slow the excavators slew speed.
¡ Engine emergency stop/idle system.
¡ Self-adjusting hydraulic crawler tension system.
¡ Travel motor are equipped with shock less valves for smooth starts and stops.

■ Break-in period
When the machine is new, heed the instructions below when operating the machine for the
first 100 hours (as indicated on the hour meter).
Using a new machine roughly without breaking it in will lead to quicker deterioration of machine
performance and may shorten the machine’s service life.
¡ Warm up the engine and hydraulic oil sufficiently.
¡ Avoid heavy loads and rapid operations. Operate with a load of about 80% the maximum
load.
¡ Do not start up, accelerate, change directions, or stop abruptly unless necessary.

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CONTENTS
Introduction .................................... 2
Machine Description ...................... 3

Safety .............................................. 7

Controls .........................................35

Operation .......................................63

Transport .......................................91

Maintenance ..................................95

Troubleshooting .......................... 141

Specifications .............................. 155

Options ........................................ 181

Index ............................................ 221

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SAFETY
General precautions .................................... 8
Preparing precautions ............................... 12
Starting precautions .................................. 14
Operating precautions ............................... 16
Stopping precautions ................................ 23
Transporting precautions .......................... 24
Maintenance precautions .......................... 25
Safety signs (Decals) ................................. 32

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SAFETY
General Precautions

Observe all safety rules Wear appropriate clothing and


personal protective equipment
¡ Operation, inspection and maintenance of
this machine must be performed only by
a trained and qualified person.
¡ All rules, regulations, precautions and
safety procedures must be understood
and followed when performing operation,
inspection and maintenance of this
machine.
¡ Do not perform any operation, inspection
and maintenance of this machine when
under the adverse influence of alcohol, ¡ Do not wear loose clothing or any
drugs, medication, fatigue, or insufficient accessory that can catch on controls or in
sleep. moving parts.
¡ Do not wear oily or fuel stained clothing
that can catch fire.
¡ Wear a hard hat, safety shoes, safety
glasses, filter mask, heavy gloves, ear
protection and other protective equipment
as required by job conditions. Wear
required appropriate equipment such as
safety glasses and filter mask when using
grinders, hammers or compressed air, as
metal fragments or other objects can fly
and cause serious injury.
¡ Use hearing protection when operating the
machine. Loud prolonged noise can cause
hearing impairments, even the total loss
of hearing.

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SAFETY
General Precautions

Provide a fire extinguisher and Use a signal person and flagman


first aid kit

Know and use the hand signals required for


¡ Know where a fire extinguisher and first particular jobs and make sure who has the
aid kit are located and understand how to responsibility for signaling.
use them. ¡ All personnel must fully understand all the
¡ Know how to contact emergency signals.
assistance and first aid help. ¡ The operator shall respond to signals only
from the appointed signal person, but shall
obey a stop signal at any time from
anyone.
¡ The signal person must stand in a clearly
visible location when giving signals.

Never remove safety equipment


¡ Make sure all protective guards, canopies,
doors, etc., are in place and secure. Repair
or replace damaged components before
operating the machine.

¡ Know how to use the safety lock lever, seat


belt and other safety equipment and use
them properly.
¡ Never remove any safety equipment
except for service. Keep all safety
equipment in good operating condition.

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SAFETY
General Precautions

Be sure to lock the safety lock Avoid fire and explosion hazards
lever before leaving the
operator’s seat

Keep flames away from fuel, hydraulic fluid,


oil, grease and antifreeze. Fuel is particularly
¡ Before leaving the operator’s seat, raise flammable and dangerous.
the safety lock lever to engage the lock ¡ When handling these combustible
and stop the engine. If any controls should materials, keep lit cigarettes, matches,
be touched accidentally when the safety lighters and other flames or sources of
lock lever is lowered, the machine will flames away
move suddenly, and cause serious injury ¡ Do not smoke or permit open flames while
or death. fueling or near fueling operations.
¡ Note that the dozer blade control is not ¡ Never remove the fuel cap or refuel with
locked, even when the safety lock lever is the engine running or hot. Never allow fuel
set to the lock position. Do not touch this to spill on hot machine components.
control accidentally. ¡ Clean up spilled fuel, oil or other
¡ Before leaving the operator’s seat, lower flammable fluids immediately.
the working equipment, raise the safety ¡ Check for fuel, oil or hydraulic fluid leaks.
lock lever to engage the lock, and stop Stop all leaks and clean the machine
the engine. Also, be sure to remove the before operating.
key and take it with you. ¡ Do not cut or weld on pipes or tubes that
contain flammable fluids. Clean thoroughly
with nonflammable solvent before cutting
or welding.
¡ Remove all trash or debris from the
machine. Make sure that oily rags or other
flammable material are not stored on the
machine.
¡ Handle all solvents and dry chemicals
according to procedures identified on
manufacturers’ containers. Work in a well-
ventilated area.
¡ Never use fuel for cleaning purposes.
Always use a nonflammable solvent.
¡ Store all flammable fluids and materials
in a safe and well-ventilated place.

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SAFETY
General Precautions

Exhaust fumes from the engine Be careful not to get crushed or


can kill cut

¡ Do not operate the engine in an enclosed Never put your hands, feet or other parts of
area without adequate ventilation. your body between the upperstructure and
¡ If natural ventilation is poor, install the undercarriage or tracks, between the
ventilators, fans, exhaust extension pipes machine body and working equipment, or
or other artificial venting devices. between a cylinder and moving part. The size
of these gaps change when the machine
moves and if caught a person can suffer
severe injury or death.

Handling asbestos dust Using optional products


Inhaling asbestos dust has been linked to ¡ Consult with a Takeuchi dealer before
lung cancer. When handling materials which installing optional attachments.
may contain asbestos, take the following ¡ Do not use attachments that have not
precautions: been approved by Takeuchi or a Takeuchi
¡ Never use compressed air for cleaning. dealer. Doing so may compromise safety
¡ Avoid brushing or grinding of the materials. or adversely affect the machine’s
¡ For clean up, use wet methods or a operation or service life.
vacuum equipped with a high efficiency ¡ Takeuchi will not be held responsible for
particulate air (HEPA) filter. any injuries, accidents or damage to its
¡ Wear an approved respirator if there is no products caused by the use of a non-
other way to control the dust. When approved attachment.
working indoors, install a ventilation
system with a macro molecular filter.
Never modify the machine
Unauthorized modifications to this machine
can cause injury or death. Never make
unauthorized modifications to any part of this
machine.

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SAFETY
Preparing Precautions

Know the working area Alway keep the machine clean


Before starting operation, know the working
area to ensure safety.
¡ Check the topography and ground
condition of the working area, or the
structure of the building when working
indoors, and take the necessary safety
measures in dangerous spots.
¡ Note and avoid all hazards and
obstructions such as ditches, underground
lines, trees, cliffs, overhead electrical wires ¡ Clean windows, mirrors and lights to
or areas where there is danger of a slide. ensure good visibility.
¡ Wipe off any oil, grease, mud, snow or
ice, to prevent accidents due to slipping.
¡ Remove all loose objects stored in the
machine and all objects which do not
belong in or on the machine and its
equipment.
¡ Remove any dirt, oil or grease from the
engine area, to prevent fires.
¡ Clean the area around the operator’s seat,
removing any potential obstacles.
¡ Check with the local utilities for the
locations of buried gas and water pipes
and buried power cables. Determine jointly
what specific precautions must be taken
to insure safety.
¡ When working on roads, be sure to take
into account the safety of pedestrians and
vehicles.
• Use a flagman and/or signals.
• Fence off the working area and prohibit
entry to unauthorized persons.
¡ When working in water or crossing shallow
streams or creeks, check the depth of the
water, the solidity of the ground, and the
speed of the current beforehand. Make
sure the water is not deeper than the
allowable depth.
Refer to the section titled “Cautions on
Operating” for further instructions.

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SAFETY
Preparing Precautions

Perform inspection and


maintenance daily

Failure to notice or repair machine


irregularities or damage can lead to
accidents.
¡ Before operating, perform the prescribed
inspections and make repairs immediately
should any irregularities be found.
¡ If a failure that causes loss of control such
as steering, service brakes or engine
occurs, stop the machine motion as
quickly as possible, follow the shutdown
procedure, and keep machine securely
parked until the malfunction is corrected.

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SAFETY
Starting Precautions

Maintain three point contact Clear the area of other persons


when mounting and dismounting before starting the machine
¡ Do not jump on or off the machine. Never Do not start the engine until you are sure it is
attempt to mount or dismount a moving safe. Before starting, check or perform the
machine. following.
¡ When mounting and dismounting the cab, ¡ Walk around the machine and warn all
first open the door fully to the locked personnel who may be servicing the
position and check that it does not move. machine or are in the machine path. Do
(For machines with cabs) not start until all personnel are clearly away
from the machine.
¡ Check for any “DO NOT OPERATE” tags
or similar warning notices on the cab door,
controls or starter switch.
¡ Sound horn to alert everyone around the
machine.

Start the engine from the


¡ Always face the access system and operator’s seat
maintain a three point contact with the
recommended handrails and steps while ¡ Adjust, secure and latch the operator’s
getting on and off the machine. Keep steps seat.
and platform clean.
¡ Never use the safety lock lever or control
levers as hand holds.

¡ Fasten the seat belt.


¡ Check that the parking device is applied
and place all controls in the neutral
position.
¡ Check that the safety lock lever is in the
lock position.
¡ Clear the area of all persons.
¡ Start and operate the engine from the
operator’s seat only.
¡ Never attempt to start the engine by
shorting across the starter terminals.

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SAFETY
Starting Precautions

Starting with jumper cables In cold weather

Use jumper cables only in the recommended ¡ Be careful of slippery conditions on


manner. Improper use of jumper cables can freezing ground, steps and hand holds.
result in battery explosion or unexpected ¡ In severe cold weather, do not touch any
machine motion. metal parts of the machine with exposed
Refer to the section titled “If the Battery flesh, as flesh can freeze to the metal and
Goes Dead” for proper instructions. Cause injury.
¡ Do not use ether or starting fluids on this
engine. These starting aids can cause
explosion and serious injury or death.
¡ Warm up the engine and hydraulic fluid
before operating.

After starting the engine


After starting the engine, perform the
following operations and checks in a safe
place with no persons or obstacles in the
area. If any malfunctions are found, follow
the shutdown procedure and report the
malfunction.
¡ Warm up the engine and hydraulic fluid.
¡ Observe all gauges or warning
instruments for proper operation.
¡ Listen for unusual noises.
¡ Test engine speed control.
¡ Operate each control to insure proper
operation.

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SAFETY
Operating Precautions

Ensure good visibility Check for safety in the


surrounding area before starting
¡ When working in dark places, turn on the
machine’s working lights and headlights
and/or provide extra stationary lighting if
necessary.
¡ When visibility is poor due to severe
weather (fog, snow or rain), stop operating
the machine and wait until conditions
improves.

¡ Understand the machine limitations.


¡ Use a signal person where clearances are
close or your vision is obstructed.
Do not permit riders on the ¡ Never allow anyone to enter the slewing
machine (swing) radius and machine path.
¡ Signal your intention to move by sounding
the horn.
¡ There are blind spots to the rear of the
machine.
If necessary, swing the cab around before
backing up to check that the area is safe
and clear.

¡ Do not allow anyone to ride on any part of


the machine at any time while traveling.
¡ Do not allow anyone to be on any part of
the machine while operating.

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SAFETY
Operating Precautions

Check the position of the ¡ Do not slew (swing) while traveling. If you
must operate the hoe attachment while
undercarriage (tracks) before
traveling, operate at speeds slow enough
traveling so you have complete control at all times.
¡ When a load greater than a set value is
applied during 2nd speed (high speed)
travel, the speed will automatically slow
down by switching to 1st speed (low
speed). Thereafter, when the load
becomes lighter, the speed will increase
by returning to 2nd speed (high speed).
Exercise due caution since the travel
speed changes automatically.
Before operating the travel levers, check to
make sure that the dozer blade is to the front
of the operator’s seat. BE AWARE that when
the dozer blade is to the rear of the operator’s
seat, the travel levers operate in the opposite
direction to when the dozer blade is in the
front.

E4A040

¡ Avoid crossing over obstacles whenever


Travel safety possible. If you must do so, keep the hoe
attachment close to the ground and travel
slowly. Never cross obstacles if they will
seriously tilt the machine (to an angle of
10° or greater).
¡ On uneven ground, travel at low speed
and avoid accelerating, stopping or
changing directions abruptly.
¡ When roading a machine, know and use
(12 to 16 in.)
the signaling devices required on the
¡ Travel with the dozer blade up, the hoe machine. Provide an escort for road travel
attachment folded as shown on the when required.
diagram, and the bucket raised 30 to 40
cm (12 to 16 in.) from the ground.
¡ Note that when the bucket is operated
while making a right pivot turn (i.e., when
only the left crawler is turning), the speed
of the pivot turn may suddenly increase.

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SAFETY
Operating Precautions

Cautions on traveling on slopes


When traveling on slopes or grades, be
careful that the machine does not tip (roll)
over or slide.
¡ Never exceed the machine’s stability
capabilities (maximum gradeability - 35°,
lateral tipping angle - 15°). Also note that
when actual working area conditions are ¡ Do not change directions or cross slopes
poor the machine’s stability capabilities sideways. First return to a flat surface then
may be lower. redirect the machine.

¡ When traveling on slopes or grades, lower Operate on snow or ice with


the bucket to a height of 20 to 30 cm (8 to
extra care
12 in.) off the ground. In emergencies,
lower the bucket to the ground and stop ¡ When traveling on snow or frozen
the machine. surfaces, keep the machine travel speed
¡ When traveling on slopes or grades, move down and avoid accelerating, stopping or
slowly in first gear (low speed). changing directions abruptly.
¡ Do not travel down slopes in reverse. ¡ Remember that the road shoulder, fences,
¡ On grass, dead leaves, wet metal or frozen etc., may be buried in the snow and not
surfaces, the machine may slide sideways visible.
even on very gentle slopes. Make sure ¡ Lower the dozer blade when parked on
the machine never faces sideways with unsure ground conditions.
respect to the slope.

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SAFETY
Operating Precautions

Insure driver safety before ¡ Maintain the maximum possible distance


from power lines and never violate the
loading trucks
minimum clearance.
¡ Always contact the nearest electric utility
and determine jointly what specific
precautions must be taken to insure safety.
¡ Consider all lines to be power lines and
treat all power lines as energized even
though it is known or believed that the
power is shut off and the line is visibly
grounded.
¡ Use a signal person to observe the
Do not load a truck unless the driver is in a approach of any part of the machine or
safe place. load to the power line.
¡ Never swing or position the bucket over ¡ Caution all ground personnel to stand
personnel or truck cabs. clear of the machine and the load at all
¡ Load the truck from the rear. times.
¡ If the machine should come in contact with
a live electrical source, do not leave the
operator’s seat. Do not allow anyone to
approach or touch the machine.

Keep a safe distance from


electrical power lines

¡ Be especially careful of buried high voltage


power lines.

Never approach power lines with any part of


the machine and its load unless all local and
national required safety precautions have
been taken. Electrocution and death can
result from arcing, touching or even being
close to a machine that is in contact with or
near an electrical source.

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SAFETY
Operating Precautions

Watch out for hazardous working • The ground is weak after rain or
explosions.
conditions
• The ground is also unstable on banks
and near dugout trenches.

Operating on slopes is
dangerous
When operating on slopes or grades, slewing
(swinging) or operating working equipment
¡ Never undercut a high bank. Be may cause the machine to lose stability and
particularly alert for the possibility of a tip over. Avoid operating on slopes whenever
cave-in. possible.
¡ Do not operate in places where there is a
danger of falling rocks.

Fill

¡ Level off the work area.

¡ Keep machine well back from the edge of


an excavation. Avoid undercutting the
machine.

¡ Avoid swinging the loaded bucket in a


downhill direction. This will reduce the
stability of the machine.

¡ Do not approach unstable surfaces (cliffs,


road shoulders, deep trenches, etc.). The
ground may give way under the machine’s
weight or vibrations, causing the machine
to tip over.

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SAFETY
Operating Precautions

Never slew (swing) sideways with Excavators are not designed for
excessive weights lifting loads

The machine can tip over more easily in the The machine is specifically designed for
lateral direction than in the longitudinal excavation work and has no safety devices
direction. for crane operation. Extreme caution should
¡ Do not slew (swing) sideways with be used if the excavator is used for lifting.
excessive weight at the front. ¡ Never lift loads in excess of capacity.
In particular do not slew sideways on Overload will cause the machine to roll and
slopes. can result in serious injury or death.
¡ The front is heavier for machines equipped ¡ All rated lift capacities are based on the
with breakers, crushers or telescopic arms machine being level and on a firm
than for machines equipped with the supporting surface. For safe working
standard bucket. Do not operate such loads, the user is expected to make due
machines sideways especially with the allowance for the particular job conditions
digging arm (boom) downhill. such as soft or uneven ground, non-level
condition, side loads, dynamic or jerked
loads, hazardous conditions, experience
of personnel, etc. The operator and other
personnel should fully acquaint
themselves with the operator’s manual
Watch boom clearance
before operating this machine, and rules
for safe operation of equipment shall be
adhered to at all times.
¡ Failure of the bucket linkage or slings
could result if chains or slings are
incorrectly attached, resulting in serious
injury or death.
¡ Do not attempt to pull stumps out of the
ground while using the machine as a
crane. The loads imposed on the machine
When operating under bridges, in tunnels, under this use are completely unknown.
near power lines or indoors, be careful not ¡ Never allow any personnel to stand on or
to hit the boom or arm against overhead under lifted loads or even within the
objects. maneuvering area.

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SAFETY
Operating Precautions

Danger of flying objects Cautions on Towing


This machine is not equipped with protective
guards to protect the operator from flying
objects. Do not use the machine in places
where there are risks of the operator being
hit by flying objects.

N0A006

When towing, selecting the wrong wire rope,


inspecting improperly, or towing in the wrong
way could lead to accidents resulting in
serious injury or death.
¡ The wire rope breaking or coming
detached could be extremely dangerous.
Use a wire rope suited for the required
towing force.
¡ Do not use a wire rope that is kinked,
twisted or otherwise damaged.
¡ Do not apply strong loads abruptly to the
wire rope.
¡ Use safety gloves when handling the wire
rope.
¡ Make sure there is an operator on the
machine being towed as well as on the
machine that is towing.
¡ Never tow on slopes.
¡ Do not let anyone near the wire rope while
towing.

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SAFETY
Stopping Precautions

Park safely

E3A4901

¡ Park the machine on firm, level ground and


apply the parking device.
¡ When parking on streets, use barriers,
caution signs, lights, etc., so that the
machine can easily be seen even at night
to avoid collision with other vehicles.

¡ Before leaving the machine, do the


following:
1. Lower the bucket and dozer blade to
the ground.
2. Raise the safety lock lever to engage
the lock.
3. Stop the engine and remove the key.
4. Lock the cab and covers.

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SAFETY
Transporting Precautions

Load and unload the machine Hoist the machine safely


safely
¡ Know and use correct crane signals.
¡ Inspect the hoisting equipment daily for
damaged or missing parts.
Fasten to the suspension fitting
¡ When hoisting, use a wire rope with
sufficient strength with respect to the
Ramp machine’s weight.
Stopper ¡ Do not hoist with the machine in a posture
other than the one described in the
Distance between ramps
15° or less
E4F001
procedure below. Doing so is dangerous
as it may result in the machine losing its
The machine may roll or tip over or fall while balance.
loading or unloading it. Take the following Refer to the section titled “Hoisting the
precautions: Machine” for further instructions.
¡ Select a firm, level surface and keep ¡ Do not hoist the machine with an operator
sufficient distance from road shoulders. (s) on it.
¡ Use loading ramps of adequate strength ¡ When hoisting, hoist slowly so that the
and size. Maintain the slope of loading machine does not tip.
ramps within 15 degrees. ¡ Keep all other persons out of the area
¡ Secure the ramps to the truck bed. when hoisting. Do not move the machine
¡ Keep the truck bed and loading ramps over the heads of the persons.
clean of oil, clay, ice, snow, and other
materials which can become slippery.
Clean the tracks.
¡ Block the transport vehicle so it can not
move. Transport the machine safely
¡ Use a signal person when loading and ¡ Know and follow the safety rules, vehicle
unloading the machine, and travel slowly code and traffic laws when transporting
in first gear (low speed). the machine.
¡ Never change course on the ramp. ¡ Consider the length, width, height and
¡ Do not slew (swing) on ramps. The weight of the truck with the machine
machine may tip over. loaded on it when determining the best
¡ When slewing (swinging) on the truck bed, route.
do so slowly as the footing can be
unstable.
¡ Engage the slew (swing) lock after loading.
¡ Block both tracks and secure the machine
to the truck bed with load binders.

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SAFETY
Maintenance Precautions

Attach a “DO NOT OPERATE” tag Anti-explosive lighting


Severe injury could result if an unauthorized
person should start the engine or touch
controls during inspection or maintenance.
¡ Stop the engine and remove the key
before performing maintenance.
¡ Attach a “DO NOT OPERATE” tag to the
starter switch or control lever.

Use anti-explosive electrical fixtures and


lights when inspecting fuel, oil, coolant,
battery fluid, etc. If lighting that is not anti-
Use the correct tools
explosive should break, the substance could
ignite, resulting in serious injury or death.

Do not use damaged or weakened tools or


tools designed for other purposes. Use tools
suited for the operation at hand. Do not allow unauthorized
personnel in the work area

Replace important safety parts


periodically
¡ Replace fuel hoses periodically. Fuel
hoses become weaker over time, even if
they appear to be in good shape.
¡ Replace important safety parts whenever
an irregularity is found, even if it is before Do not allow unauthorized personnel in the
the normal time for replacement. work area. Chips or other debris can fly off
Refer to the section titled “Important Parts” machine parts when grinding, welding or
for further details. using a hammer.

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SAFETY
Maintenance Precautions

Prepare the work area Stop the engine before


performing maintenance
¡ Select a firm, level work area. Make sure
there is adequate light and, if indoors, ¡ Avoid lubrication or mechanical
ventilation. adjustments with the machine in motion
¡ Clear obstacles and dangerous objects. or with the engine running while stationary.
Eliminate slippery areas. ¡ If maintenance must be performed with
the engine running, always work as a two
person team with one person sitting in the
operator’s seat while the other works on
the machine.
• When performing maintenance, be sure
to keep your body and clothing away
from moving parts.

Always clean the machine Stay clear of moving parts

¡ Clean the machine before performing ¡ Stay clear of all rotating and moving parts.
maintenance. Wrapping or entanglement may result in
¡ Stop the engine and cover electrical parts serious injury or death.
when washing the machine. Water on ¡ Keep hands, clothing and tools away from
electrical parts could cause short-circuits the rotating fan and running fan belts.
or malfunctions.
Do not use water or steam to wash the
battery, sensors, connectors or the
operator’s compartment.

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SAFETY
Maintenance Precautions

Securely block the machine or Cautions on working on the


any component that may fall machine

L3A005

¡ Before performing maintenance or repairs ¡ When performing maintenance on the


under the machine, set all working machine, clean up the foot area and strictly
equipment against the ground or in the observe the following so as not to fall:
lowermost position. • Do not spill oil or grease.
¡ Securely block the tracks. • Do not leave tools laying around.
¡ If you must work beneath the raised • When walking, watch your step.
machine or equipment, always use wood ¡ Never jump off the machine. Use the steps
blocks, jack-stands or other rigid and and handrails when climbing on and off
stable supports. Never get under the the machine, and always support your
machine or working equipment if they are body at three points with your hands and
not sufficiently supported. This procedure feet.
is especially important when working on ¡ Use protective equipment as required by
hydraulic cylinders. job conditions.

Securely block the working Place heavy objects in a stable


equipment position
To prevent unexpected movement, securely
block the working equipment when repairing
or replacing the cutting edges or bucket teeth.

Secure the engine hood or cover


when opened
When removing or installing the hoe
Be sure to secure the engine hood or cover attachment, place it in a stable position so
when opening it. Do not open the engine that it does not tip over.
hood or cover on slopes or in strong wind.

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SAFETY
Maintenance Precautions

Use caution when fueling Be careful with hot and


pressurized components

¡ Do not smoke or permit open flames while


fueling or near fueling operations. Stop the engine and allow the machine to
¡ Never remove the fuel cap or refuel with cool down before performing inspection and
the engine running or hot. Never allow fuel maintenance.
to spill on hot machine components. ¡ The engine, muffler, radiator, hydraulic
¡ Maintain control of the fuel filler nozzle lines, sliding parts and many other parts
when filling the tank. of the machine are hot directly after the
¡ Do not fill the fuel tank to capacity. Allow engine is stopped. Touching these parts
room for expansion. will cause burns.
¡ Clean up spilled fuel immediately. ¡ The engine coolant, oil and hydraulic fluid
¡ Tighten the fuel tank cap securely. Should are also hot and under high pressure.
the fuel cap be lost, replace it only with Be careful when loosening caps and
the original manufacturer’s approved cap. plugs. Working on the machine under
Use of a non-approved cap without proper these conditions could result in burns or
venting may result in pressurization of the injuries due to the hot oil spurting out.
tank.
¡ Never use fuel for cleaning purposes.
¡ Use the correct fuel grade for the operating Be careful with hot cooling
season. systems

Handling of hoses
Fuel, oil or hydraulic fluid leaks can cause a
fire.
¡ Do not twist, bend or hit the hoses. Do not remove the radiator cap or drain plugs
¡ Never use twisted, bent or cracked hoses, when the coolant is hot. Stop the engine, let
tubes and pipes. They may burst. the engine and radiator cool and loosen the
¡ Retighten loose connections. radiator cap or drain plugs slowly.

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SAFETY
Maintenance Precautions

Be careful with fluids under ¡ Stop the engine and turn the starter switch
to the ON position and move all the control
pressure
levers and pedals several times in all
Pressure can be maintained in the hydraulic directions to release the pressure from the
circuit long after the engine has been shut working equipment circuitry.
down. (When equipped with accumulator)
¡ Release all pressure before working on ¡ When removing plugs or screws or
the hydraulic system. disconnecting hoses, stand to the side and
loosen slowly to gradually release the
internal pressure before removing.

¡ Hydraulic fluid under pressure can


penetrate the skin or eyes and cause Handling of the Accumulator
injury, blindness or death. Fluid escaping
from a small hole can be almost invisible.
Wear a safety goggles and heavy gloves
and use a piece of cardboard or wood to
search for suspected leaks.
If fluid is injected into the skin, it must be
removed within a few hours by a doctor
familiar with this type of injury.
N0A0051

High pressure nitrogen gas is enclosed in


the accumulator and incorrect handling could
possibly bring about serious personal injury
due to explosion. The following matters
should be strictly observed:
¡ Do not disassemble.
Release all pressure before ¡ Do not bring close to fire or throw into a
working on the hydraulic system fire.
¡ Do not make hole, weld, or fuse.
Oil may spurt out if caps or filters are removed ¡ Do not subject to shock such as hitting or
or pipes disconnected before releasing the rolling.
pressure in the hydraulic system. ¡ At time of disposal, it will be necessary to
¡ Gradually press the air breather button to release the enclosed gas. Please contact
relieve tank pressure. a Takeuchi sales or service outlet.

29
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SAFETY
Maintenance Precautions

¡ Wear safety glasses and gloves when


Disconnect the battery
working with batteries.
¡ Batteries generate flammable and
explosive gases. Keep arcs, sparks,
flames and lighted tobacco away.
¡ Use a flashlight to check battery electrolyte
level.
¡ Stop the engine and shut off electrical
equipment while inspecting or handling the
battery.
¡ Do not short circuit the battery posts with
Disconnect the battery before working on the metal items.
electrical system or doing any welding. ¡ Always unfasten the negative (–) battery
Remove the negative (–) battery cable first. cable first when disconnecting the battery
When reconnecting the battery, connect the cable. Always connect the negative (–)
negative (–) battery cable last. battery cable last when fastening the
battery cable.
¡ Loose battery terminals may result in
sparks. Be sure to fasten terminals tightly.
¡ Make sure the vent caps are tightened
securely.
¡ Do not charge a battery or jump-start the
engine if the battery is frozen. Warm to
15°C (60°F) or the battery may explode.
¡ Do not use the battery when the fluid level
Avoid battery hazards is below the lower level. Doing so will
hasten the deterioration of the internal
¡ Batteries contain sulfuric acid which will portions of the battery and shorten the
damage eyes or skin on contact. battery life, and can also cause rupturing
• If acid contacts eyes, flush immediately (or an explosion).
with clean water and get prompt medical ¡ Do not fill the battery above the upper
attention. level. Doing so could cause the fluid to
• If acid is accidentally swallowed, drink leak, contact and damage the skin, or
large quantities of water or milk and call cause parts to corrode.
a physician immediately.
• If acid contacts skin or clothing, wash
off immediately with clean water.

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SAFETY
Maintenance Precautions

Have a Takeuchi service agent Disposing of wastes


repair welding cracks or other
damage
Ask a Takeuchi service agent to repair any
welding problems which are detected. If not
feasible, make sure the welding is done by a
qualified person in a properly equipped
workplace.

¡ Funnel spent fluids from the machine into


Vibrations to which the operator containers. Disposing of fluids improperly
is subjected destroys the environment.
¡ Follow the prescribed regulations when
According to the results of the tests carried disposing of oil, fuel, engine coolant,
out to determine the vibrations transmitted refrigerant, solvents, filters, batteries or
to the operator by the machine, the upper other harmful substances.
limbs are subjected to vibrations lower than
2.5 m (8.2 ft) / sq.sec. while the seated part
of the body is subjected to vibrations lower
than 0.5 m (1.64ft) / sq.sec.

Checks after maintenance


¡ Gradually raise the engine speed from a
low idle to maximum speed and check that
no oil or water is leaking from serviced
parts.
¡ Move the controls and check that the
machine is operating properly.

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SAFETY
Safety Signs (Decals)

The following safety signs (decals) have been placed on your machine in the areas indicated.
They are intended for the personal safety of you, and those working with you. Please take
this manual, walk around your machine and note the content and location of these safety
signs. Review these signs and the operating instructions in this manual with your machine
operators.

¡ Keep the signs legible. If they are not, obtain replacements from your Service outlet.

7 10 11 2 1

2
1
2 9
12

12 5 3

4 8 6
13

12

L3A0033

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SAFETY
Safety Signs (Decals)

1. No.03593-06500 5. No.03593-47020

WARNING WARNING
DO NOT WHEN BUCKETS WIDER THAN STANDARD
enter into ARE FITTED TO THIS MACHINE,
CAB(CANOPY)DAMAGE MAY OCCUR WHEN
swinging area FULL LEFT HAND BOOM OFFSET IS USED.
03593-47020

2. No.03593-07400 6. No.03393-75040

CAUTION CAUTION
DO NOT USE ETHER
STOP ENGINE USAGE OF ETHER FOR STARTING
PURPOSES MAY CAUSE INTERNAL
BEFORE OPENING ENGINE DAMAGE. 03393-75040
03593-07400

7. No.05693-21980
3. No.03593-13700

WARNING WARNING
1 - This machine,if improperly operated or
maintained can cause bodily harm,or even Engine may be HOT
DEATH.
05693-21980
2 - Read and understand the owners manual
supplied with this machine before operating.
3 - Keep all safety devices in place and
8. No.05693-53810
functional.
4 - Do not operate the machine unless the seat
belt is properly fastened around you.
CAUTION
5 - Follow the instructions in the Operator’s Setting this switch to the “OFF”
Manual when hoisting the machine or position will shut down all of

fastening it to the transport vehicle. 03593-13700 the electrical circuits and the
memory of the radio preset
tuning buttons will be deleted.

05693-53810

4. No.03593-47010

9. No.03993-00400
WARNING Position of Fire extinguisher
THIS EXCAVATOR
MUST NOT BE USED
AS A CRANE 03593-47010

Except for UK

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SAFETY
Safety Signs (Decals)

10. No.03593-06600 13. No.05693-52528


Diesel Fuel for EU
Noise Outside the Cab
This value indicates the noise level
outside the machine and refers to the
noise perceived by the persons who
D are in the vicinity of the work area.
Diesel Fuel Only
03593-06600

11. No.03593-06700
Hydraulic oil

Serial No. 17514412 ~


No.05693-49035

12. No.03993-00500
Position of Hoisting

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CONTROLS
Names of Components .............................. 36
Doors and Covers ...................................... 38
Seat and Seat Belt ...................................... 43
Instrument cluster ...................................... 46
Switches ..................................................... 48
Levers and Pedals ..................................... 53
Accessories ............................................... 55

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CONTROLS
Names of Components

Mono-Boom

4 3 5 2 1 16 15 14

13

19

12

6 11
10
9
8

7 18 21 17 20
L3B001

Upperstructure Undercarriage Working equipment


1. Cab 6. Crawler belt 11. Bucket
2. Seat 7. Idler 12. Bucket cylinder
3. Engine hood 8. Track roller 13. Arm
4. Fuel tank 9. Carrier roller 14. Arm cylinder
5. Hydraulic tank 10. Travel motor 15. Boom
16. Boom cylinder
2-Piece Boom 17. Boom bracket
18. Swing cylinder
15 22 19. Auxiliary hydraulic lines
20. Dozer blade
21. Blade cylinder
22. Intermediate boom
23. Boom adjustment cylinder

23

16

L3L0151

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CONTROLS
Names of Components

15 10 7 14 5 14 23 13 22 4 17 11

1
16
9
12
24
6
21
3
18
2
20 8
19
L3B0022

1. Instrument cluster 13. Boom swing pedal


2. Starter switch 14. Travel lever
3. Light switch 15. Auxiliary hydraulic switches
4. Horn button 16. Blade lever
5. Travel speed switch 17. Decel. button
6. Wiper switch 18. Fan switch (Heater)
7. Safety lock lever 19. Heater / Defroster switch
8. Slew speed switch 20. Ventilation/Circulation switch
9. Power mode buttons 21. Cigarette lighter
Throttle buttons 22. Selector Button (2-Piece boom)
10. Left operating lever 23. Pedal lock
11. Right operating lever 24. Intermediate boom operation indicator
12. Fuse box lamp (2-Piece boom)

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CONTROLS
Doors and Covers

Opening
Starter Key
1. Pull the knob (1) towards you and open
the door.
To open the door from inside the cab, push
the lever (2) to the front.
2. Open the door fully and press it against
the cab to lock it in place.

Closing
E4B003
4
The starter key is used not only to start and
stop the engine, but also to lock and unlock
the following places: 3
¡ Fuel filler cap
¡ Cab door
¡ Covers C4C002

1. Either push release lever (3) to the front


or lower release lever (4).
Cab Door
2. Close the released door.

WARNING
When mounting and dismounting the
cab, first open the door fully to the locked
position and check that it does not move.

Open the door fully and press it against the


catch at the back of the door to lock it in place.
Always lock the door when mounting and
dismounting and when operating the
machine. Front Window
Lock and unlock WARNING
2 1 ¡ Grasp the handles firmly with both
hands when opening and closing the
front window. Your head or hands may
get caught if they slip.
¡ If you open the front window, be sure
to lock it in place with the lock pins on
the left and right sides. The window
C4C001
may fall if it is not locked in place.
1. Insert the starter key and turn it.

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CONTROLS
Doors and Covers

Opening 1. Pull the left and right lock pins (1) to the
inside and turn them to the locked position
to unlock the front window. If the lock pins
(1) are partially sticking out they may
cause damage.
1 3 1 2. Grasp the front (lower) handle (2) with the
Released Locked left hand, the rear (upper) handle (3) with
the right hand, then slowly lower the front
1 1 window.
C4C003
3. Move the lock pins (1) to the outside to
1. Park on a level surface and stop the lock the front window.
engine.
2. Set the safety lock lever to the locked
position.
3. Pull the left and right lock pins (1) to the Lower Front Window
inside then turn them to the locked position
Removing
to unlock the front window. If the lock pins
(1) are partially sticking out they may
4 4
cause damage.

2
C4C005

1. Open the front window and stow it in the


ceiling.
1 3 1
C4C004 2. Grasp the protruding parts (4) on the left
and right with your fingers and slowly lift
4. Grasp the lower handle (2) with the left
the lower front window off.
hand, the upper handle (3) with the right
hand, then lift and slide to the rear.
5. Once the window frame is against the
stopper, move the lock pins (1) to the 4 4
outside to lock front window.

Closing
5 5

WARNING
6 6 C4C006
When closing the front window, lower the
window slowly so as not to hit your head. 3. Hold the glass firmly, place the lower front
Lowering the window abruptly may result window through the guides (5) at the rear,
in injury or damage the front window. then set it on the supports (6) and fasten
it in place.

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CONTROLS
Doors and Covers

Opening
Side Window
1. Insert the starter key and turn it
counterclockwise to unlock the front cover
(1).
7
2. Tilt the front cover (1) until it stops.

Closing
1. Support the front cover (1) by hand and
release the stay (2).
2. Close the front cover (1).
C4C007
3. Insert the starter key and turn it clockwise
1. Grasp the catch (7), unlock it and open to lock the front cover (1).
the side window.
2. To close the side window, close it until a
click is heard.

Front Cover (Tool Box) Side Covers

CAUTION CAUTION
¡ Never jump off the machine. Use the ¡ When opening the side cover, open it
steps and handrails when climbing on firmly to the locked position.
and off the machine, and always ¡ When opening and closing the side
support your body at three points with cover, be careful not to get your hands
your hands and feet. or other parts of your body caught.
¡ When opening the front cover, open it
firmly to the stopped position.
¡ When opening and closing the front 1
cover, be careful not to get your hands
or other parts of your body caught.

The grease gun and tools are stored under 2


the cover.
3 L3B054

1
Opening
1. Insert the starter key and turn it
2 counterclockwise to unlock the side cover.
2. Lift the side cover fully until it stops.
3. Press the stay (2) to fix the side cover.
Engine hood unlock knob (3) is located
L3B007
behind the right side cover.

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CONTROLS
Doors and Covers

Closing
Maintenance Cover
1. Support the side cover (1) by hand and
release the stay (2).
2. Close the side cover (1) and press it down WARNING
until a click is heard at the front. ¡ Before opening the maintenance cover,
stop the engine.
¡ When maintenance on the machine,
clean up the foot area and strictly
observe the following so as not to fall:
Engine Hood • Do not spill oil or grease.
• Do not leave tools laying around.
WARNING • When walking, watch your step.
¡ Never jump off the machine. Use the
Before opening the engine hood, be sure steps and handrails when climbing on
to stop the engine. If your hands or tools and off the machine, and always
should get caught in the fan or fan belt support your body at three points with
while the engine is running they may be your hands and feet.
severed. ¡ Use protective equipment as required
by job conditions.
1
2

L3B009 3
L3B053
Opening
1. Open the right side cover and pull the Opening
unlock knob (3). 1. Insert the starter key and turn it
Refer to “Side Covers”. counterclockwise to unlock the
2. Lift the engine hood (1) fully. maintenance cover (1).
2. Pull the knob (2), then lift the maintenace
Closing cover (1) fully until it stops.
1. Close the engine hood and press it down
until a click is heard at the front. Closing
1. Support the maintenance cover (1) by
hand and release the stay (3).
2. Close the maintenance cover (1).
3. Insert the starter key and turn it clockwise
to lock the maintenance cover (1).

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CONTROLS
Doors and Covers

Fuel Filler Cap

WARNING
¡ Never jump off the machine. Use the
steps and handrails when climbing on
and off the machine, and always
support your body at three points with
your hands and feet.
¡ Do not smoke or permit open flames
while fueling or near fueling
operations.
¡ Supply fuel in a well ventilated place
and with the engine stopped.
¡ Clean up spilled fuel immediately.
¡ Do not fill the fuel tank to capacity.
Allow room for expansion.
¡ Tighten the fuel filler cap securely.

Close Open

L3B011E

Opening
1. Open the key cover, insert the key and
turn it clockwise to unlock the fuel cap.
2. Turn the fuel cap counterclockwise and
remove it.

Closing
1. Set the fuel cap in place and turn it
clockwise.
2. Turn the key counterclockwise to lock the
fuel cap, then remove the key.

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CONTROLS
Seat and Seat Belt

¡ Lower lever (2) to adjust the front angle of


Seat
the seat cushion.
1. To raise the front angle of the seat cushion,
WARNING apply your weight to the backrest while
Adjust, secure and latch the operator’s holding the lever down.
seat. 2. To lower the front angle of the seat
cushion, apply your weight to the front of
the seat cushion while holding the lever
down.
G 7 ¡ To adjust the height of the seat, adjust the
front and rear angles of the seat cushion
alternately.
C (5 steps, 60 mm (2.36 in.) adjustment
A range)
Example: First raise the front angle of the
1 seat cushion, then raise the rear
2 angle of the seat cushion by the
same amount. This raises the
3 B height of the seat.
4 D ¡ After adjusting to the desired position,
release the lever to lock it.
5 E F
6 (C) Back angle adjustment
L3B012

(A) Lumber adjustment


WARNING
1. Turning knob (1) in the direction of the ¡ Do not set the seat back to its
arrow causes the lumber of the backrest maximum reclining position and slide
to curve outwards for greater back support. the seat backwards at the same time.
2. Turning the knob (1) further then removes Doing so may break the rear window
the curve and returns the seat to its original glass, resulting in injury.
position. ¡ Be careful not to allow the force of the
The knob (1) cannot be turned counter to spring to bring the seat back sharply
the direction of the arrow. forward.

(B) Seat cushion angle and height 1. Raising your torso, sitting down firmly in
adjustment the seat.
¡ Lift lever (2) to adjust the rear angle of the 2. Pulling lever (3) allows you to use the
seat cushion. pressure of the springs in the seat pressing
1. To raise the rear angle of the seat cushion, against your back to adjust the reclining
raise yourself slightly off the seat while angle of the seat back. Release the lever
lifting the lever. (3) at the desired angle and the seat back
2. To lower the rear angle of the seat cushion, will remain fixed in that position.
apply your weight to the rear of the seat
cushion while lifting the lever.

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CONTROLS
Seat and Seat Belt

(D) Fore-and-aft adjustment


1. Pull on lever (4) and slide the seat
backward or forward to bring it to the
optimum position for operating the
machine.
2. Release the lever (4) at the desired
position and the seat will remain fixed
there.
Adjustment stroke: 17 steps,160 mm (5.9 in.)

3 2

4
E
5

6
L3B013

(E) Weight adjustment


1. Turn handle (5) and set it to indicate the
weight of the person to operate the
machine.
May be set to any value from 50 to 120 kg
(110 to 265 lbs.)

(F) Lever stand adjustment


1. Pull on lever (6) and slide the lever stand
backward or forward to bring it to the
optimum position for operating the
machine.
2. Release the lever at the desired position
and the lever stand will remain fixed there.
Adjustment stroke: 70mm (2.8 in.)

(G) Headrest adjustment


The position of the headrest (7) can be
adjusted in the up and down directions.
1. Grasp the headrest with both hands and
move it upwards or downwards.

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CONTROLS
Seat and Seat Belt

Seat Belt

CAUTION
Always fasten the seat belt securely
before starting the engine.

Fastening the seat belt


1. Adjust the seat to the optimum position
for operating, raise your torso, and sit back
firmly into the seat.
2. Pull the seat belt to the desired length.

B E4B023

3. Make sure that the belt is not twisted and


then insert the tongue plate (A) into the
buckle (B) of the seat belt until you hear a
clicking sound as it locks in place.

Releasing the seat belt

E4B024

1. To remove the seat belt, simply press the


button (C) located on the buckle.
The seat belt is automatically stowed
away.

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CONTROLS
Instrument Cluster

1
11 L FC H
4
2
13
3
5
14
6
7
12
9
10
8 L3B014

4. Battery Charge Warning Lamp


Warning Lamps
This lamp flashes and an
IMPORTANT: If a warning lamp flashes alarm is sounded if a
and an alarm is sounded, stop all problem arises in the
C4B030
operations immediately and inspect and charging system while the
maintain the appropriate part. engine is running.
Refer to page 148 “Troubleshooting”.
5. Air Cleaner Warning Lamp
1. Engine Emergency Lamp This lamp flashes and an
This lamp flashes and an alarm is sounded if the air
alarm is sounded if the cleaner filter is clogged while
engine oil pressure or the G4B010
the engine is running.
G4B009
coolant level in the radiator
drops or the coolant temperature rises 6. Water Separator Warning Lamp
abnormally while the engine is running. After This lamp flashes and an
approximately 5 seconds, the engine stops alarm is sounded if the water
or low idling automatically.
is detected within the water
L3B015
separator while the starter
2. Engine Oil Pressure / Coolant Level
switch is in the ON position.
Warning Lamp
This lamp flashes and an
alarm is sounded if the 7. Fuel Level Warning Lamp
lubricant oil pressure or This lamp lights when the
L3B036
coolant level in the radiator fuel level is low while the
drops abnormally while the engine is running. starter switch is in the ON
L3B016
position.
3. Coolant Temperature Warning Lamp
This lamp flashes and an
alarm is sounded if the
engine coolant temperature
C4B012
rises abnormally while the
engine is running.

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CONTROLS
Instrument Cluster

Indicators Meters
8. Glow Lamp 12. Hour Meter
This lamp turns off when This displays the total engine
engine preheating is running time in hours.
completed. The rightmost digit indicates
C4B013 L3B019
tenths of hours (6 minutes).
Set the inspection and maintenance intervals
9. Travel Speed Lamp according to the time displayed on the hour
This lamp lights when the meter.
travel speed switch is set to
2nd (high speed). 13. Water Temperature Gauge
C4B014
This gauge indicates the
temperature of the engine
10. Slow Speed Slew Lamp coolant water.
This lamp lights when slow L3B020
The needle should be within
speed slew switch pressed, the green range during machine operation.
the slew speed decreases. The red range indicates overheating.
L3B017

14. Fuel Gauge


11. Power Mode Lamp This gauge indicates the
These lamps indicates the amount of fuel in the tank.
engine speed. Be sure to top off the tank
L3B021
L FC H before running out of fuel.
L3B018

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CONTROLS
Switches

Starter Switch Battery Switch

OFF IMPORTANT: Never set this switch to the


ON OFF (O) position while the engine is
START
running.
Doing so might cause damage to the
electrical system.

L3B043

IMPORTANT: Do not repeatedly switch


the key from OFF to ON and ON to OFF
over a short period. Doing so will cause
engine breakdown.
L3C004

OFF ........ Position for stopping the engine


and inserting or removing the key. OFF (O) .. Switches off the electrical circuit.
ON .......... Position in which the engine is Be sure to set this switch to the
running. At this position, all the OFF (O) position when storing the
electrical equipment is functional. machine for a long period, or
When the coolant temperature is when performing maintenance of
low, the air heater is energized the electrical system.
and automatic preheating is ON ( I ) .... Connects the electrical system.
done. Check that this switch is in the
START .... Position for starting the engine. ON ( I ) position before starting
When the key is released, the the engine.
switch automatically returns to the
ON position. Supplement: Setting this switch to the
OFF (O) position will shut down all of the
electrical circuits and the memory of the radio
preset tuning buttons will be deleted.

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CONTROLS
Switches

Horn Button Selector Button (2-Piece boom)

WARNING
Pressing (switching ON or OFF) the
selector button while the boom swing
pedal is depressed is dangerous, since
the attachment will move unexpectedly.
Always set the boom swing pedal back
L3B046
to the neutral position before operating
the selector button.
Press the button on the right operating lever
to blow the horn.

Decel. Button

WARNING
Set the operating and travel levers to L3L020
neutral before operating the decel. button.
The machine’s operating speed will This button changes from the boom swing
change abruptly if the button is operated operation to the intermediate boom
while the levers are engaged. operation.
Press this button to change over to operation
of the intermediate boom . The intermediate
boom operation indicator lamp will light. One
L FC H more press of this button will result in a return
to boom swing operation. Actual operation
is performed with the boom swing pedal.

L3B0471

Press the button on the right operating lever


to lower the engine speed to low idling.
Press the button again to return to the engine
speed set with the throttle or power mode
buttons.
Note: The one-touch decelerator is a device
for lowering the engine speed and reducing
fuel consumption when little engine output
is required, for example when the operating
and travel levers are in neutral.

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CONTROLS
Switches

Intermediate Boom Operation First Auxiliary Hydraulic Switches


Indicator Lamp (2-Piece boom)
Slider Switch
(Proportional control)
Proportional control allows for slow-to-fast
movement of auxiliary functions.
Example: If you move the slider switch half
way, the auxiliary function will move at
approximately one-half speed.

L3L017
A
This lamp illuminates when the intermediate B
boom operation is chosen by the selector
button.

Travel Speed Switch L3L021

Move this switch to control the flow of the oil


WARNING in the first auxiliary hydraulic lines.
When a load greater than a set value is
applied during 2nd speed (high speed) Auxiliary Hydraulic Buttons
travel, the speed will automatically slow
down by switching to 1st speed (low
A
speed). Thereafter, when the load
becomes lighter, the speed will increase B
by returning to 2nd speed (high speed).
Exercise due caution since the travel
speed changes automatically.
L3L035

Press those buttons to control the flow of the


oil in the first auxiliary hydraulic lines.
¡ Proportional control of the auxiliary
hydraulic circuit is not possible.

(A) .... Hydraulic oil flows to left auxiliary


line(a)
(B) .... Hydraulic oil flows to right auxiliary
Press this switch to set the travel speed to line(b)
2nd speed (high speed). Press again to
return to 1st speed (low speed).

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CONTROLS
Switches

Power Mode Buttons Throttle Buttons

L3B025 L3B026

The engine speed can be changed at the The engine speed increases and decreases
touch of a button. When one of these buttons continuously while these buttons are
is pressed, the engine is set to the set speed pressed. When the button is released, the
and the power mode indicator lights. engine speed is set to the speed at the time
the button is released.
: Engine speed increases
: Engine speed decreases
When the throttle buttons are operated and
L FC H the engine speed is at a point between the
different modes, the lamps on both sides
light. When the speed is changing, only the
lamp for the nearest engine speed lights.
L3D005

L: This mode is always set when the


engine is started.
Use it for light and very light operations.
FC: Use this mode for light operations and
leveling operations which do not require
speed. Using this mode reduces fuel
consumption and noise.
H: Use this mode for general digging and
loading operations requiring power and
speed.

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CONTROLS
Switches

Slew Speed Switch Light Switch

L3B027 L3B028

Pressing this switch shifts rotation into Slow When this switch is turned while the starter
speed, bringing its speed down to the switch is at ON, the lights turn on as follows:
minimum. Slow speed is useful for O ...... Off
performing tasks that require precision I ....... Meter light, front light, side lights, tail
handling even at the cost of speed or lights and boom light turn on.
efficiency.

Slow speed
Wiper Switch
The lamps on the switch and instrument
panel will light up. Used for low speed slew. IMPORTANT: If no washer fluid is
The maximum set speed in slow speed can discharged, do not operate the washer.
be adjustable. Doing so may damage the pump.
Upon shipment, it is set to 7.6 min –1 (7.6 rpm). IMPORTANT: Operating the wiper with no
Contact a Takeuchi sales or service outlet moisture on the windshield will scratch
for change. the glass. Apply water or washer fluid
when operating the wiper.
Normal speed IMPORTANT: In cold seasons, the wiper
The lamps will go out and slew will return to blade may freeze to the glass. Operating
its normal speed. the wiper forcibly may damage the wiper
Supplement: As a safety precaution, the motor.
machine is designed so that you cannot
switch to normal speed while slewing in slow
speed. You must instead bring the rotation
to a temporary halt and then press the slew
speed switch to return to normal speed.

PUSH

L3B0291

O ............ Off
I ............. Wiper INT
II ............ Wiper
PUSH ..... Washer

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CONTROLS
Levers and Pedals

Safety Lock Lever Boom Lock Valve (2-Piece boom)

WARNING
¡ Before leaving the operator’s seat,
raise the safety lock lever to engage
the lock and stop the engine.
If any controls should be touched
accidentally when the safety lock lever
is lowered, the machine will move L3L023
suddenly, and cause serious injury or
death. Serial No. 17510003 ~ 17512503
¡ Note that the dozer blade control is not This valve blocks the hydraulic oil flow to
locked, even when the safety lock lever prevent the boom from lowering.
is set to the lock position. Do not touch Lower the lever to engage the boom lock.
this control accidentally. Raise the lever to disengage the boom lock.
¡ Be careful not to touch the operating
levers when raising and lowering the
safety lock lever. Operating Levers

WARNING
¡ Be careful to check which pattern of
lever control arrangement you are
operating with before beginning
operations.
¡ The explanations in this manual are for
L3B030 the ISO pattern.

This device is for locking the hoe attachment,


auxiliary hydraulic control, slewing and
traveling.
When the lever is raised, the lever stand
springs up and the lever is locked.

L3B048

Use these levers to operate the boom, arm,


bucket and upperstructure (slew).
Refer to page 68 “Lever Pattern”.
Refer to page 75 “Operating the Working
Equipment”.

53
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CONTROLS
Levers and Pedals

Blade Lever Boom Swing Pedal

B

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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